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The Merciad, Oct. 7, 1993

The Merciad, Oct. 7, 1993

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 7, 1993
The Merciad, Oct. 7, 1993

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^ff
4*441
PPM -noil pfEnavKBRsgr
tmiiEGiyitv^
OCTOBER
S3WSS
VL
Laker Footballadvances
to 2-1 after
defeat of
Canisius,'Division
I-AA,
on
their
turf.
page
8Women's Soccer beats
#1
in the nation
page
8
Depeche Mode concert review
page
3
Enter the Mercyhurst Family
of
the Year Contest
Students are invited to submit thoughtful
nominations
of familiesthey know which
are
nurturant, supportive of family members of all
ages,
sources
of
informal
on-going?education
and which "have
made a
difference"
in
people's lives. All contestants must be eitherfoil- or part-time Mercyhurst students. Entries must be typed orword-processed, and no longer than five pages
8
1/2"x*ll\
Thefamily about which the contestant
writes
need not be her/his own
and the
family
may
be traditional or non-traditional.
Winners
mustbe willing to
be
photographed
Videotaped
and interviewed! Entriesshould
be
submitted to: MFOY|Contest, Box 49, MercyhurstCollege
on or
before Friday, November 5,1993.
Campus Ministry launches fooddrive
National Hunger Awareness Month will
be
celebrated
at
Mercyhurst
by
Campus Ministry. The annual Food Drive will be
held
on Monday;
Ocfc-11
and
Tuesday^OctPlfi from*6
to Q>p.mi'Volunteers are needed to collect canned goods from Mercyhurstneighbors. Those interested are asked to meet in the Great Room.Also celebrated will be the World Food Day Teleconference:
"Seeds
of Conflict: Biodiversity
and Food
Security"onFriday,Oct
15 from noon to 3
p.m.
in
the government chambers.
The
panel willdiscuss the topics and have an opportunity to call in questions to
Vice-President Al
Gore,
a
member of the expert
panel
in Washing-
ton.
|F1U
season
is
just around
the
corner, free vaccinations
Flu
vaccinations will be administered by the Health Services Staff
in
103 Preston throughout Nov. 30
from
9
a.m.
to 4
p.m.
There is
nocharge
 for
he
vaccine. Persons allergic to
eggs
and/or pregnant (orsuspect they
are) are
advised
not to
receive
the
vaccine.
Walkers needed for
a
good cause
Join the Mercyhurst Team as a walker for
the'
American
HeartAssociation Walk which
will be held on
Oct
10 at 2
p.m. Interestedstaff and
students should
contact Janet Price
in Zurn 115 to sign
up.
Writings proficiency
needed tograduate
Seniors
planning
to
graduate in
1994 who
have not
yet successfullycompleted the writing proficiency requirement for graduation,
mustmake
arrangements
as soon as
possible. Students should
arrange
to
take the exam
on Tuesday, Oct.
26 from 3 to
6 p.m., or Saturday, Oct
30 from 9
a.m.
to 12
p.m. Students should report
to
the lobby of Zurnat least
 fifteen
 minutes before
the exam
is scheduled to begin. Thosein
need
of information about
the exam
or study sessions
can contact
the Dean's Office
as soon as
possible.
This exam is required
in orderto receive
a
degree.
Would
;you
like
to
become moreinvolved
in
the community?
This commitment involves supervising student volunteers
a
t the
Emm a us
Soup Kitchen on Saturdays from
10:30 a
.m.
until
1:30
p.
m.
The
number of Saturdays requested throughout
the year are
depen-dent
on
the number of volunteers.
There is training
for those new to
the soup
kitchen.
This
event is
a
very rewarding experience. Thoseinterested
are
asked to
contact PaulaJWolper a t
ext*2339.
It's
Resident writer returns
By Anne
L.
McNelis
Asst.
News/Copy Editor
He'sfhere. He's written tenbooks so far. He's written bookreviews
for the New
York
Times.
He's written articles for maga-zines and* newspapers.
He's
worked
in
public relations andadvertising.
His name is
W.S.
Kuniczak. He
came to
Mercyhurst
in
early July1993
to
help with the Summer
Writer's
Institute
for
High SchoolStudents.Kuniczak,
63,
remains
at
Mercyhurst
now
as writer-in-resi-dence. He said his primary roleswhile he is here are
"to
write andto reside."He
is three
chapters away from
finishing
his
eleventh book,Century's Child.! He plans
to
complete this novel within aboutthree months and he is under
a
publishing contract
for
two morebooks after that. He said,
"As
long as the president
and
facultycan stand having me here,
I'll
stay."
I
Kuniczak was born in Lwow,Poland and escaped to Britain in
"1939.
He moved
to
the UnitedStates in 1950. He served in theUnited States
Army
in Korea andbecame a U.S. citizen in 1958.
This is not Kuniczak's
 first
ime
at
Mercyhurst.
He
was writer-in-
re side nee
here from
1985
until1987.
He
also launched
the
Sum-
mer
Writer's
Institute in
1985.
Heworked with
the'Institute
again
this
past summer.
lib
decided to come back toMercyhurst
I
because,
"I
had
reached a point in my own writ-
ing
j-
where
I
needed
a
change...every so
often
you
need
to
emerge."Another
 reason
or his return
was the
"young energy" he knewhe could
 find
 here.
M
I
missed that,"he said.He packed up all his writingmaterials and moved into DuvalWest in September to
work.
"I
love
it
here,"
he
said,
"the kids
aremarvelous.
99
Kuniczak said
he
does not even mind when stu-dents get loud on the weekends."I have earplugs with soul," hesaid, indicating his headphonesand large collection of classical
^
music compact
discs.
In addition
to
writing while he
«t
is here, Kuniczak hopes to workwith some students who are "in-
W.S.
Kuniczak,
renowned author
terested
in
writing somethinglonger than 20-page short stories."I'd love
to
work withstudents..
J love corrupting
peopleto where they think about becom-ing
novelists-instead
of
historyprofessors," he said."I am entirely at (the
Fuglish
Department's) disposal,
99
saidKuniczak.
He said
he
can
informaspiring writers about
"th
e practi-
cal
side
of
the picture.. J loveteaching." He also plans to
con-
tinue to assist with the SummerWriter's Institute.
philharmonic
orchestra.
"She is
a
performer...she
is
con-
stantly surrounded
by
poeplc,"said
Kuniczak.
He said he needsquiet
to write
so
"we operate our
business
lives
separately.
That
is
not to
say there is
not a
profoundlove affair going
on."
j
They also have
a 20-acre
farmin Warrington, PA, which is whereKuniczak does
a great deal
of hiswriting.Kuniczak
said
he decided whenDr. Kenneth
Schiff,
associateprofessor of English,
said,
"I
thinkhe can be very valuable to theschool." Schiff
also
said Kuniczakis
"going to work
on getting someoutside funding for the Writer'sInstitute," of
which
Schiff is di-rector."We
are
hoping serious under-graduate
 fiction
 writers
will takeadvantage of his presence," said
Schiff
I
Kuniczak truly loves his life."It's a
 fine
ife,"
he said. He saidthere
is
room for the things hewants
to
do besides write,
such as
have
a
family.
He has been m
arried three
times.
His present wife, ballerina AmyWallin, lives
in
their loft in NewYork. Wallin lives in New Yorkbecause she is in the process ofopening
the only recording
studio
in
New
York
City large enough toaccomodate
an*
entire
w
he was 16
he would
be
a writer. Atfirst his parents were against it,particularly his father.
'When
he lived
long enough tosee
my
 first
 published novel, thenhe understood," said
Kuniczak.
Kuniczak
said he loves "a damngood story well-told...that's
what
I try to
do."He has written works of fictionas well as translating a traditionalPolish trilogy.
Kuniczak has
copies of all his'ks in his living room/office.He said one of the advantages tobeing
a
writer is
that he
can look
at?his
bookshelves and see
his
whole
life.
Though
he owns all
ofhis
books,
he said,
"I've
neverread
a
book of mine
in
print."Throughout conversation,Kuniczak repeats how satisfied
he is here
at Mercyhurst,
"There's
a grace about this place. When Idrive through those
gates,
I feellike an enormous load has been
lifted...I'm
very happy here."
trill
|Friday
30
percent chance
of
rainy high 70
to75,
!
SaturdaySunday
Chance
of
show-
ers, high 70, low
55to60.
Chance
of
morn-ing showers, high60, low 40.
 
PAGE
2 THE MERCIADOCTOBER
7,1993
Political Science professorsheds light on Russian crisis
By Randall demons, Ph.D
Director, Political Science De-partment
Merciad Contributing Writer
Although
our
attention
is nowshifting to the turmoil and trag-edy of Somalia, the recent con-flict in Russia should not disap-pear from our table of concerns.The purpose of this article is toexamine the background of thesituation, to try to clarify whathappened, to discuss why
the
U.S.should care and
to
gaze tenta-tively into the future
J*'
J The history of
U.S.
and Rus-
9
sian relations (dating back
to
Catherine'
s
refusal
to "sel
1" troopsto King George III to quell theAmerican rebellion)
has
been anemotional roller coaster based onunrealistic positive,
and
unrealis-tic negative, perceptions of each
other—tempered
since the?Cu-ban Missile Crisis
with the know
1-edge that we held each otherssurvival in
our
hands.Despite
the
tensions
a
potential
Nuclear
Armageddon created,
the
Cold
War
became a familiar
and
relatively
stable
system. Ameri-cans
i
rooted
for
MikhailGorbachev, we cheered the lift-ing of the Iron Curtain and wereamazed at the implosion of theSoviet Union.
II meant
the Cold War wasover.Many proclaimed we had won,that
9
(as Fukuyama stated)
the
"End
ofHistory"
had
arrived, andcapitalism and Western democ-racy had prevailed.A few lonely voices called outwe might soon
look
back on thegood old days of
the
Cold War.Today the volatility of the newworld disorder is startling to many.
In
August of
1991
we watchedthe
aborted coup attempt thwarted
largely
by
the
 refusal
 of the mili-tary to move against their Parlia-ment (many of the same troopsinvolved
in the
recent move
against that
same building). BorisYeltsin literally stood up againstthe coup
and
increased his popu-larity. That popularity stood himin good stead
in the
recent
crisis.As
the
reforms begun
by
Gorachev ^progressed, Yeltsinencountered many opponents to
the
pace
and
scope of reforms
he,
and the West, wanted.
see "Crisis"
on
page
5,
I
By Anne
L.McNeils
Asst.
News/Copy Editor
One of the seats on the collegeSenate must
be
filled.
At
Monday's meeting, MSG repre-sentatives nominated
senior
-*
-
Kevin Nixon and junior ErinMcGuinness. Both nominees ac-cepted.Senior
Sherly
n Celone, who is
currently a
member
of
Senate,explained some of
the
responsi-bilities involved. Celone said
a
number of different committeesare formed to
address
various
is-
sues.
"Whatever
goes throughMSG goes to Senate and then itgoes to the Board of Trustees,"said Celone.Senate is made up of students,faculty and administration. Vot-ing for
the
open position will
take
place at
a
future MSG meeting.
dfc MSG3
President
.^George
Paydock remindedreps,
"We're
going to do this again," as otherseats are vacated.Representatives also approved
a'motion
for mandatory
office
hours. Each
 rep
 will be requiredto work in the MSG office for acertain
number
of
hours
per week.They will answer the phone andtake care
of
any computer
or
fixing needs.Vice-President
Kris ten
Hurdaddressed election of new renre-sentatives. 10 spots
are
open, butas of Monday evening, only oneletter of intent
had
been
received.The deadline for letters of intentwas Wednesday.
^Paydock discussed
the phonelines.
"Sixteen new lines...are
sup-posed
to
be
in
place,"
;
he said.
When
the
new lines
are
working,the campus will have
as
manyphone lines as Gannon has "andthey have more students
than
wedo,"said Paydock.MSG meetings are held everyMonday evening at 8:30 p.m. in
the
Government
Chambers
of theStudent Union. All students arewelcome to attend.
Hot
l
n
Ready
Dinner
Mivou Can
Eat man,
&
Salad!
Wednesday
&
Sunday5:009:00
pm
Good
on
dine-in
only/
Buffet is available
at the
following locations:
.
38th St.4402 Buffalo
Rd.
4236 Peach St.
Ai-1600
AE-8
Beverages not includedTax not included.Coupon not
r
HHirtJ
Security
News!
Increased parking on BriggsAve.
by
Mercy hurst
students
whodo not want to pay the new $45campus parking
fee
has street resi-dents upset
I
Brie police have warned cam-pus
security
that because of theneighborhood pressure,
they
willbegin
to boot
or
tow cars that have
been ticketed and fail to
correct
the illegal parking.
Cars have been
blocking drive-ways and parking
on the
"No Park-ing" side
of
Briggs causing theproblem.
Director
of Security,
Bud
Dever|suggests that students
purchase
a
parking registration sticker be-cause the cost of
a
tow is about$60 and a parking citation runsfrom
$ 19
plus costs
a
fter 72hours-Security is being overwhelmedby requests
to|open
apartmentsfor students who are locked
outM
"It
seems
more students
are
notcarry ing their apartment keys,
and
[when room
mates leave for class,
they lock
out fellow roommates,"aid Dever.
"
In other news, security
is
di-
eting
such
requests
to
RAs
and/
r
Assistant Resident
Life
Direc-rs first, as
is
outlined in stan-dard operating procedures.
ipever
urges students to carrytheir keys to prevent
a
hassle."Most requests for security oc-cur in the evening when they* arethe busiest, resulting
in
delays inresponse," Dever said.
^Dever
said additional duties forsecurity
staff
members
at the
highschool and the Mercy Mother-house will make performing un-locks
even more d ifficul tbetween
6 and
9
p.m.Also
securityireceived
two re-ports
of
missing wallets/pursesfrom the dinner/dance for parentslast Saturday evening.A
wa 1
let was reported missingfrom a purse,
and
a purse contain-ing prescription
glasses also
wasreported
as
lost or stolen, accord-ing to Dever.
; 'The
fyallet was a large, red,credit-card type wallet-contain-ing credit cards, but no cash,"
said Dever.£
The purse had sentimental valueto the
owner/he
added.Anyone having any informa-
tionftha twill
assist security
in the
recovery should
contact
BudDever
at
Ext 2329,
orstopby
214Main.
-
•.-
news
liy Noreen
Roberts
«
Merciad Staff ReporterMercy
hurst College
and the Sis-ters
of
Mercy have become fa-
ns.
In the 1994 edition of US
ilt
News
and World Report's BestColleges Guide,
"Mercy hurst's
Thaw Point" was featured.This is a story that tells howMother
M.
Borgia
Egan,Meicyhurst's founding dean andfirst president, bought ovr im-pressive wrought-iron gates for$600 from the
Thaw
Estate
in
Pittsburgh.At that time, they were about tobe sold for
scrap
metal!
Jo Ann
Toole
y, senior editor
of
America's Best' Colleges,
is
quoted
as
saying Meicyhurst'sentry was "one of the most inter-esting submissions they received
by
co lieges
andu ni versitie
s acrossthe United States."
*Sft
The gate story was chosen as
a
she said.result
of
a.letter
sent to public
relations
officers requesting theysubmit "interesting, historical andbrief articles." Mary Daly, vicepresident of external affairs,
sentin
the story.
In
early summer, the gate storymade
 first
 and second cuts. As
a
result, photos
were
re quested. Thecollege was contacted
several
times for verification
of
facts."Some
of
the questions the re-search; reporters asked evenstumped
those -of
us
who*have
been
affiliated'with
the
collegefor
30 years and
who have a pietty
good handle on
Meicyhurst's
his-tory,"
said
Daly.
"At one
point wesent a car to the Motherhouse to
pick up
Sr.
La we re nee to open
the
archives
for Mother Borgia's earlyrecords when they called andwanted to know how much thegates originally cost. That wassomething not one of
us
knew,"
SPRING
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OCTOBER
7,19»
THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Concert Review:Rocks Civic Arena
Mode
By Heather Ryan
Merciad
Staff
Reporter
l|
1
Depeche Mode, the alterna-
tive id a nee-rock
group whichfirst emerged in the early
'80s
asa new wave act, gave a spec-tacular concert performance atthe Pittsburgh Civic Arena onFriday, Sept
17,1993.
*
The show
openedjwith"Higher
Love"
 from
he
Mode's1993 release
"Songs
of Faith and Devotion.
"The first
thing theaudience heard
were
mysterious,
alluring
tones of
"Higher
Love."The band was hidden behind a curtain to add to the atmosphere.Their giant silhouettes loomed before the crowd.
.
Halfway
through the first song, the curtains dropped and thegigantic shadows disappeared. The four
man
band in the flesh wasvisible.Some of their other songs included "Knocking on
Death's
Door,""Stripped,"
"Policy
of,Truth,"
"Enjoy
the Silence,"
"Behind
the.Wheel,"
"Never
Let
Me
Down," "Halo," "A Question
of Lust "£
Dave Gahan, lead singer, dressed simply in
a
white tank top and
tight
flared
jeans,
and two
tattoos
on
his chest
and
shoulders, dancedprovocatively on-stage.Gahan sang brilliantly, danced
brilliantly
and even got the crowdin the arena involved during "Personal Jesus."Not only was the crowd dancing wildly, they
also
responded wellto the lead singer as he encouraged the Arena to
sing
"Personal
Jesus"
along with him. Reach out and touch faith!Behind the dancing vision of Dave Gahan were video screensportraying nearly
nude
figures. When Martin
Goiie
descended from
the
upper stage
to
sing "A Question of
Lust,"
the
crowd went wild.The songs performed from the new album included "Mercy inYou,"
"I
Feel You,"
"Walking
in my Shoes," "Judas,"
"In YowlRoom,?*.'Higher Love?
and
"^~n
 A
t;
~"
"p,
L
t
Q
I»^
,
mjw
in|
Whort
played guitar
for
a few numbers rather than synthesizer, andanother member of the band, Alan Wilder,
played
drums throughoutthe entire concertAs they were
once
a
completely synthesized band in the
'30s,
theyare now moving toward electric guitars and even drums.
^
Depeche Mode came back for two encores
and
sang "Everything
Counts"
for
one.
.*«
The
The,
a band also from England, opened for Depeche
Mode.
The crowd was surprisingly calm during this opening show.Perhaps many of them were unaware that
The
The now includeslegendary
artist,
Johruw
Marr, formerly of the Smiths and thePretenders.
^
Although Marr maintained
a
low profile during the forty
minutes
The The performed, lead singer Matt Johnson
deliverecKstrong
vocals and an overall brilliant opening for the Mode.The The performed
"Love
is Stronger Than Death," and "SlowEmotion Replay,"
 from
heir release,
"Dusk,"
as well
as some
olderselections.Don't
miss The The
and
Depeche
Mode
at the Richfield Coliseumon Tuesday, Oct 26 in Cleveland!
Kathy
Schubert take time from the Parents' Weekend dinner/dance to pose for
a
photo.
"I had awonderf ul
time.The dance
was
a blast.
It w<
time with family and friends," Sue
M.shrell.
WMCE student DJs jam the airwaves
By Michelle Ryan
Arts and Entertainment Editor
Did^you
know many of yourclassmates and peers are city fa-mous disc
jockeys?!
WMCE,
Mercyhurst's
radio station, ishome for
ma
ny
students
through-out the week. Here is
what
someof your friends have to say aboutthe radio station and their shifts.
i
Jim Bean, Music Director
"WMCJE
is more oriented to-ward the students, playing musicof what they want to listen
to.
L,
"As music
director.
I don't liketo dictate what the students play.They play their own music. It ispretty much up to them.
-uU
. "Each DJ has his or her ownstyle of
music,.
I'm trying to getmore involvement We get morecalls
 from
he
city of Erie than wedo from
campus."
JohnDanknich,Station Man-ager
*
"I basically live here.
"I
do pretty much everything.Either I work on getting the logstraightened, training new DJs,dubbing music and just overall
hanging
out over here."I spend well over 40 hours aweek here. The office is a place
where
I can come
to
relax,
do
myhomework,
hang
out,
and talk
withother student administrators ofMercyhurst's vast communica-tions complex. I have a lot ofresponsibilities and I like it thatway.
'I've
been here two and a halfyears now and I enjoy being onthe air. It gives me a chance tovent and talk."It's
nice
to
have people
call
inand I know they're listening tomy show.
"I
play top 40, for lack of abetter term."Things are anything but bor-ing over here. There are alwaysthings to be doing and enjoying."I think we're the most orga-nized and
we have the best
DJs ina long
time.
We're very commit-
W
ted
and*
organized. We want tomake the station better.
'That's oux
number one
goa
1."
Jim Doherty, Communica-tions major
"I
play
my
own unique brand oftop 40 related songs. It's a widevariety of
mus
ic for the wholefamily- - and students, too. I'vebeen working at WMCE for al-most four years. It's almost
like
my third home.
Captain Leiseringruns
a great ship."Ryan Morris, Criminal
jus-
>/Law
enforcement and spe-cial
guest,
Marcie Presta, El-ementary Education"Our shift
is
hip
hop
happening
music.
Listen
to
our show! We'rethe hottest duo on the radio. Lis-ten to us 10p.m. to 12a.m. onWednesdays. We'll take all yourrequests and dedications."Joanna Shirey, Events Pro-moter"I type up public service an-nouncements, and when we do
radiobroadcasts
of hockey gamesor basketball games or footballgames,
I
pass flyers around cam-
pus.
I
also
review people who DJ."I play easy listening and clas-sical."Heather Marshall, Commu-nications major
|.
,
'1
work Saturday, from one tofour,
d
oing
a 1 terna ti
ve music. Stu-dents
like
alternative
music.
Youcan
hear
all the popular alterna-tive music on WMCE that youcan't hear
on
other
radio
stations."I'm from Cleveland and we
have
a
really good
a
1 terna tive sta-tion-
There's nothing like
that herein
Erie.
'« -
"I
bring a lot of my own musicto simulate what I hear in Cleve-
land.^
r
J>
i'
Noreen
Roberts,
Communi-cations major
.,"I
do the easy listening. Myshift runs Monday morning
and
Tuesday/Thursday afternoons."
Joni
Dick,
Musk major"I play classical
music
and
I
getthe music for the classical musicprogram.through Friday evenings whileGannon plays alternative through-out
the
week.
"Gannon
doesn't have
things
run by administration. We're atop 40 station six to midnightessentially, Monday through Fri-day.
"Th
is
year for the first
time
everwe have
the
Spin Radio Net-work."It's a
non-commercial
pro-gram produced by Spin Maga-
zine.
It interviews new
bands
and
big names like
Julianna
Hatfieldand the Ramones.
. v
*Q£*
"Spin
spotlights mostly
alteranative
bands.
Not
very often dothey
do
top 40 bands. They also
due
us in on upcoming concertdates and band releases. - ."The program is
 from
 7:30p.m.-
8p.m. on Saturdays.Jenn
Trinidad,
Program Di-rector
"I
play
top
40 dance
 from
 8p.m.to 10
p.m.
on Wanednesdays andon Fridays from 11p.m. to 1a.m."If people call in for requests,
the
DJs try
to
get
them
on
as
soon
»
Bob Merski, elementary education major, keeps
the
airwaves running smoothly
at
WMCE.
"I think
the
music they play (top40) attracted more listeners."Jay Kennedy, Production
Di-
rector"I DJ every Saturday, 8p.m. tomidnight I chose Saturday pur-posely so I can play alternative
music
From 8p.m. to 10p.m.
t
I
play techno
music.
My
favorite
isalternative music from 10p.m. to12a.m."For
my
job as production
di-
rector
I do
different
things.
When-ever there's
a
new
PSA,
I
make
a
recording
of the
PSA, neat sound-ing
stuf
f,
drops
in between music,promos for football games, cam-pus events, programs and I cleanequipment for both productionrooms.
"The
only reason why ^men-tioned
I
play
alternative on Satur-day is
because
WERG
Gannon
plays R & B and soul all daySaturday."We switch formats
with
Gannon.
We
play
top 40
Mondayas possible, where as other
st
tions take
several
hours
to
get therequests on the air."That's one of the bonuses ofour
radio
station. It's
a
radio sta-tion for
Mercy
hurst It's a greatway
to
hear other students
on ca
m-pus on the radio."Nicole Acquilano, Dance ma-jor
:
"First of all, my shift is theNick at Night show, on Thurs-days from10p.m.-12p.m.It
is
byfar
the?
most unique, and is verypersonal. I get
requests
and dedi-
cations.
People get psyched whenthey hear their name on the air."I play things like Alice
in
Chains,
Saigon
Kick,
and
music
Iby
local bands.
"What
I try to do is get mylistener to be a part of
the
show,like when they call and request
a
song."
-
--
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