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The Merciad, May 12, 1994

The Merciad, May 12, 1994

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The Merciad, May 12, 1994
The Merciad, May 12, 1994

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JMERCYHURST,COLLEGE'S
WEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER
MAY12,
1994
Spring activities (weekend crashes and burns
By
Jule
Gardner
Senior Writer
be covered by
Lemmon's
insur- Director of Maintenance Bill Martin was "furious" because a Briggs apartment
"Apparently
A car takes out a lightpost inGarvey
Pa
rk, another crashes intoa
house
on
38th
Street,
a
furiousfire chief helps douse a burningcouch and more
 flames
gnite onthe
soccer
 field
 and Briggs Ave. Itwas not
an
ordinary
weekend.
"First
of all, it was activitiesweekend. Our point of view
is
that,
gene ra 11
y,conduct
of
he stu-dents
and
visitors was very good,(but) there was stupid conductand senseless mischief from asmall part or
trie
community,said Director of Security, BudDever.
There
were two car accidents
Friday
night, although Dever saidthese were not necessarily con-
nected
to the
weekend
festivities.At 10:50 p.m., Friday, RichardLemmon,
of611
Briggs,
#3,
drove
his
car into
Garvey
Park,
mistak-
ing the
sidewalk
for a
driveway,Dever said. Upon tiying to getout, he backed over an antique-looking lightpost, breaking it off
at the
base, said
Devcr.'His
carbecame temporarily stuck
but
hewas eventually able to pull for-ward. He then circled the clockand
went out
the north end, where
he was
apprehended
by security,Dever said. The incident
was
seenon the security cameras.According to Dever, "He hadallegedly been drinking, althoughwe're not saying
that was
the causeof
the
accident" Lemmon facesdisciplinary action with Resi-dence Life, said Dever.The lamppost will be replacedby one in storage, "but it is likereplacing an antique. They arevery expensive." Dever said it
will run $
1,000
to $ L500
and will
a
nee.Roughly two hours later JohnLoxterman,
of 308 Mc
Auley,
and
two visiting
riends
 from
 Roches-
ter
were treated and
released at
St.Vincent Health Center after anaccident outside the gates. The
crash occurred
at
12:30
am.
Sat-urday,
May
7. The vehicle, driven
by
Loxterman,
hit
another car af-
ter
exiting
the
Mercy
hurst
gates.
Because
of excessive speed, saidDever,
the car
went
out
of controland broke: through a house on38th Street, owned by LarryEvans.
The
passengers were
Ray
Dry and
Shawn
Monaghan, ownerof the car.Loxterman
said Monaghan'scar
was totaled. The other car
and
thehouse also received "significantdamage," said Dever. He saidLoxterman's insurance is ex-pected
to
cover
it.
After the accident, Dever saidLoxterman
and Dry
left
the
sceneand were apprehended by secu-rity
in
the
lobby
of
McAuley
Hall.They
were
taken
back to
the sceneand turned over to Erie trafficinvestigators. Any charges arepending.On Saturdaynight,Dever re-
potted
two fires on campus and
one
 fire
 across the street on BriggsAvenue.
;
DeVer
and Residence Life Di-rector Gary Brown were calledonto campus after
"word
got outabout a large fire on the soccerfield," Dever said. The soccerdugout
was
burned
down. Deversaid he saw at least four peopletake off toward
the
Motherhouseas
he
approached the fire.Security, Residence Life andstudents collected "as many fireextinguishers as we could find"and. in the meantime, contacted
Friday
Mostly sunny;high
55 -
65.
Saturday
Mostly sunny;high 65 - 75.
ISunday
Chance of showers;high 65 - 75.
/
^m#///v
Kerbusch to turn on
the
 field
 sprin-klers. "It was not so big
that
wecouldn't handleit,"he said. Deversaid it continued to re-ignite be-cause of old wood
and
they werethere for a few hours trying tocontrol it. The fire department
was
called
in but had a
hard
timereaching it, he said.It was later determined
the
dug-out was already scheduled fordemolition, *Although the
 fire
 on the
lawn
of
3925 Briggs was off campus,Dever said
Mercy
hurst studentsfrom
both
sides of
the
street wereinvolved. It occurred when
"a
couch and some other things"were set on fire shortly after 8p.m. Saturday, Dever said. The
1
Erie Fire Department
was
calledto douse the flames while stu-
dents
gathered to watch.Dever said Fire Chief Gregg
some students
were yelling
at
thefirefighters, running across thestreet
and
taking pictures. Deversaid Martin demanded to talk tosomeone from the college andeventually
talked
to
Gary Brown,director of residence life. "Hewanted
to make sure
this wouldn'thappen again. Chief Martin
is
veryupset that
 fires
 were set so close
to the
buildings,"
said
Dever. Theincident is
under
investigation.Another
 fire,
his
time
in a
half-
barrel
near
4010 Briggs Ave., wasput out by Residence Life. Thefire
occurred
at
10:25
p.m., Satur-
day.
Dever
said some students
inthat building were cooking out
when
it
burned out
of
control
and
had to be put out.Dever said they were able to
stop
a potential
 fire
ater
th
at nightA couch soaked in
lammable
iq-
uid
was found
in the
basement
of
some students were planning onlighting
it,
but thought better about
it"
after
the
off campus incident"If someone would have thrown
so meth i ng do
wn there
to
set
it
off,we would have had a heck of afire," Dever said.The
danger*he
said, is that thefires on Briggs Avenue were closeto buildings,
"and
that can fume
.
into
disaster. In each case, therewas evidence
drinking
was in-volved.
When
 fires
 are
that
closeand intoxicated people are run-ning around, generally raising
'
hell,
we
have to
see alcohol
as
thecause of problems.
Sooner or
laterpeople
are
going to have to takeresponsibility," said Dever.However, Dever also stressedhe was impressed with the con-duct of most students
at
the Make-
A-Wish
band
test.
"We
were
not
called in for any of the campusfunctions."
I
He's
not
bid,
he's Bob Munson
.rsg-
-1L?
By
Jule Gardner
Senior Writer
f/
It's
a
big
year for
Bob
Munson.
He's
graduating...
the
same
yearhe celebrates
his 50th
high schoolreunion.
In
August, he'll be
68.
Not your typical Mercyhurstgrad. Then again, he's not yourtypical senior citizen, either. Atage 60, he took one class: ArtAppreciation for four hours onSaturdays. Roughly eight yearslater, he'll be
walking with
a bunchof 22-year-olds across the WarnerTheatre Stage
to
get
a
diploma.It was a gradual process, but
Bob
pummeled through these lasttwo years like they were the rib-bon in the Boston Marathon. Hequit
being-part-time
and beganthe life of
a
"normal" student (ashe phrased it) - full academicschedule, Student'Government,Campus Ministry. He was evenchosen for the illustrious job ofemcee at the Mercyhurst DatingGame.After inishing
 up
requirements
for a
liberal studiesB.A.
a
nd
his-tory minor last winter,
he
washired as the co-ordinator for thework study program. "I'm not
ready
to
retire. I don't think
I
ever
will
be.
As
long
as
I'm physicallyable,
I
want
to
work
and
give."
He
prolongs physical ability,
he
said, by exercising 45 minutesevery morning.
"I
wake up and
look at
the
obituaries. If
I'm
not
in
'em
I'm ready to really getstarted,"
he
said, smiling broader
than
his
thick red suspenders.The origin of his energy?*
An-
other morning
 ritual:
 he sets his
BOB MUNSON
attitude.
"Next
to faith, love andcharity, attitude is the biggestword in the world. Each indi-vidual can set
a
fun, healthy atti-tude everyday." His familiar blueand green checked pants
also help
to set the mood, but he eighty-sixed those until colder weather
sets
in again.Even though Bob is probablythe oldest student to
graduate fromMe rcyhurst
(no records can
prove
this), his
greatest delight
was not
being treated that way.
There
was some trepidation for me atthe start as to whether I could
keep
up,
not compete,
mind
you,with younger people. But one ofthe greatest experiences I've hadis the
reaction
of
young people
tome
They
always treated
me withrespect and accepted me as just
another
student
I"They're
a great bunch ofpeople, serious thinkers with agood
grasp
of world events."
He
also
got
a
lot of support fromfamily. Bob has three children,five
granchildren
and a great-grandchild expected to arrive in.August His oldest granddaugh-
ter is
22,
the same age
as
most
of
his
classmates.Yet
there were
skeptics,
he
said,
who
didn't think
he
would
be
able
to adjust.
"You
're never
too
old tochange,
and I
have.
I
came here
a
hawk
and
have come
out a
dove."It's his world view that'schanged.
He was a
real
"flag
wa-
ver"
with
a military drive
at
60,
he
See "Munson,
"page
2
 
PAGE
2THE MERCIADMAY
12,1994
Graduation:
Let the festivities
begin
iW^
Vivetta Petronio, winner
ofTeacher's
excellenceBy AnneL.McNeils
Copy Editor
Mercy
hurst College will hold
its
66th Commencement exercisesSunday, May 22 at the WarnerTheatre. The college will award371 degrees this year
and?320
graduates will walk across thestage
at
the Warner.Two hundred forty-five gradu-ates will
receive
Bachelor of Artsdegrees. Fifty-five Bachelor ofScience degrees
will
be
awarded.'
Ten students will receive Bach-elor of
Music
degrees. Thirty-sixassociate degrees
will
be awardedand 27 students will receivemaster's degrees.
#
Commencement begins at 2p.m.
Sunday.
Three graduateswillbe presented with awards duringthe ceremony. Two
students
willreceive the
Bishop's
Award forAcademic Excellence. This
award
recognizes genera
1
scholastic ex-cellence and
iscawarded
to the
valedictorians
of the graduatingclass.
Jakub Svoboda
and
Nalika
Nanayakarra
will receive the
award this
year. Svoboda will
re-
ceive *a
Bachelor
of
(Science inbiology
and
Nanayakarra will
re-
ceive
a
Bachelor of Arts
in
busi-
ness finance and math.The other student award pre-sented at the ceremony is the
Carpe Diem
award.
This award
isthe highest honor bestowed on
a
student by the college. It isawarded to the
senior-who
bestexemplifies the college motto,"Carpe Diem,"
which gmeans
Seize the Opportunity. It recog-nizes a student of high personalintegrity, leadership impact andintellectual distinction. Thisyear's recipient is David
McQuillen.
McQuillen
will receive
a
Bach-elor of
Arts
in
marketing.
Duringhis years
*at
Mercyhurst,McQuillen has participated in anumber of activities both at
Mercyhurst
and
around
the world.
He
founded
the
cycling
team
two
years
ago and is
currently
its cap-tain.
He
is a
member of
a
numberof
honors
associations, including
Delta
Mu
Delta
(business), KappaGamma Pi (a Catholic
honor
so-
MSG
reps elected
By
AnneL.
McNeils
Copy Editor
Mercyhurst Student Govern-ment
held
its last meeting of the
1993-94 year
on
Monday,
May 9.New representatives took officeon Monday and will be in placefor the 1994-95 school year.Next year's senior
reps
are: MattAdams, Heather Dailey, Tom
Gierszal,
s Beth
Hurrianko, Jeff
Hutchinson,
Joe Joseph, KatieJohnson, Jennifer Lowe, ErinMcGuinness,
Aisha Nix
and
Paul
Roth,
jfrfe-Jfc
%
i
Charlie
Caryl,
Katie Coneglio,Chris Glas, Holly Heid, KatieMcGlynn, Bridget Palmisano,Rob Vescio and Mark
Williams
will represent
the
junior
class.Representing next
year's
sopho-more class are
Kais
Asforur,
Tricia
Baugh, Stacey
Fitzpatrick,
Jenna
Hcyl,
Amy Kovach and DanaPazin.Reps voted to increase SACscholarships
by a
combined total
of
$3,000. Treasurer Darrin
Tovtin
said the funds
for
the schol-arships
will come out of
he moneyMSG has already budgeted to
SAC.
i
Reps also voted to, approve
Tovtin's
proposed budget. Cop-ies of
the
budget
are
available inthe student government office.Graduating Senior and former
Rep.
Kevin Nixon announced that
he
spoke
to
Gary
Brown, directorof residence life. Brown
told
himmales will be able to occupy atleast four townhouses beginningwith the 1995-96 school year.Nixon said there
is
a possibility ofmales' occupying one othertownhouse if
a
group
of
males
is
able
to demonstrate a
higher
pointstanding
than
a
group
of females.Sophomore Lee Ann Kellyspoke on behalf of
the
women'ssoccer team.
Kelly asked MSG
tohelp fund a new dugout on thesoccer
 field.
 The previous dugoutwas burned
over
the
weekend.SAC
Chair Rich Straub
said hespoke
to
David Cherico, directorof athletic and Union facilities.Cherico
toldj
Straub that heplanned to destroy the dugoutMonday afternoon.
|
President George Paydock toldKelly to meet with Cherico and
with Pete
Russo, athletic director,
to find
out about possible fundingfor
a
new dugout.Graduating Senior
and
former
Rep.
Wally Gagric
congratulatedthis year's government andwished the future government
luck.
ciety)
and
Sigma
Tau
Delta (En-glish).McQuillenVis past vice-president of
the
Mercyhurst Busi-ness Association. He works forthe Erie Insurance Group as a
communications*aide
and last
summer
he worked as
a
market-ing assistant for R. Watsons andSons in
England.^
M
McQuillen has written a bi-weekly column in the Merciadfor three years
and
he also had aradio show on WMCE. He is a
tour
guide
and
program assistantfor the* Mercyhurst SummerAbroad Program.
He.is
also aFlange
Warrior,
f
After
graduation;
McQuillenhopes to earn
a
Master of Busi-ness Administration in interna-tional business
but
said
he is notyet sure what he is going to doright away.The Teaching
\
Excellence
Award will also be presented atCommencement. Chair of thehumanities division, Director ofthe foreign language and culturedepartment and Professor ofFrench, Vivetta Petronio receivesthe award this year. The winner ofthis award is selected based onnominations by students and otherfaculty.Petronio and McQuillen
will
deliver speeches at the gradua-tion ceremonies.
*
' A
number
of other
awards
willbe presented at the GraduationAwards Dinner Dance on Satur-day, May 21. Grace Bruno willreceive the Sister Carolyn
-•
Herrmann Senior Service Award.This award recognizes a seniorwith outstanding contributions oflime, talent
and
service through-out
her
time
at Mercyhurst.
I
" Colleen Kipfstuhl will receivethe
Sister
M. Eustace Taylor Lead-ership Award. Kipfstuhl was se-lected based
on
her superior lead-ership as a student. The Mother
FrancesXavierWarde
Adult Stu-dent
Award
is awarded
to an adu Itstudent
in
recognition of superiorwork and personal and profes-
sional
achievement. This year'srecipient is
Joy
Marie Catania.Two
awards
will
also
be
givento graduate students. Shawn M.
Cronin
will receive
the
James
V.Kinnane
Graduate,Program
Administration ofJustice Award.The award recognizes Cronin's
superior work
as
a
student in theAdministration of Justice Pro-gram. Bridget G. Manning
will
receive the Outstanding gradua-tion Student Award for SpecialEducation.The President's AssociatesAchievement Awards
will*
alsobe
presented at
the
Dinner
Dance.Each department's faculty selects
an
outstanding
student to receivethe award. This
year's
award-win-
ners
are: Colleen Kipfstuhl, busi-ness;Loretta
A.
Tech,education;Amy R. Zorzi,
HRIM;
PamelaCrowell; human development;
Phyllis Marie
DiNicola, humani-
ties;
Sally
Jo
Wiltsie, natural sci-ences and mathematics; LauraBurris, performing
arts
and
Janet
E.
Perkins, social sciences.
Mia
U-Rycki
and
Jason
Hi]legasWill
both receive the President
Garvey
student Athlete of the YearAward.
Other awards include
the
SisterM. Angelica Cummings SeniorArt
Award—Jason Hi 1
legas.Pamela M. Muller will receivethe Pennsylvania
Institute
of Cer-
tified
Public Accountants Award.Two other HRIM awards
will
also be given. Katherine AnnSchubert
will
receive the SeniorAward and
Meghan
Williams willreceive the Faculty Award.There will be two Baccalaure-ate Masses on Sunday, one at 9a.m. and another at 10:30 a.m.They
will
be followed by brunch.Brunch tickets
mu st be pu rchasedahead
of
time
and are
available
at
the bookstore.
Munson
continued from
ront
 page
said. At 68, he's
still
got love ofcountry,
but
thinks
there
are
bet-ter
ways
for
peace.
"I
thought we
we re J
right in exercising U.S.
muscle.,I
don't think that anylonger. Instead of being theworld's policeman, we need tofind
a
way within the
structure."
Bob
served
in Germany duringWorld War II, signing up rightout of
high
school with many ofbis classmates. He went back toBerlin last summer
with the HRIMSwitzerland/Europe
trip. "It wasilluminating
to
see it
now.
When
I had
left
there it
was
a wasteland.
I'm
glad
I
we
nt," he said.
"We
are
better
to
be
exposed,
reminded
ofthe war."After the war, Bob went toGannon College for
a
year, thenleft when he was offered a well-paying job at Erie Insurance
Group
in 1952. He worked there
for 42
years then sold
his agency
when
he
started school full time,although he is still a licensed in-surance agent
"I
was moderately successful,but there was something missing.There was more I had to learn."Bob said he extracted so muchout of
his
classes because heap-proached
them
on a
personal sat-isfaction basis, rather than think-ing of just the grade.He is so satisfied with his edu-cation
that
he's giving some back.
Bob is
planning
on
establishing
a
scholarship for non-traditionalstudents."Dr. Mary Hembrow Snyder,speaker at the '93 commence-
ment,
said learning is
a
life-longexperience. Perhaps I am
an
ex-
ample
of this."God has granted
me
much, in-cluding my learning experience
here
at
Mercyhurst.
I
am thankfulnot only for the knowledge I'vegained,
but for the
great
people Ihave met -
administration,
fac-ulty,
and
above
all, the
students."Spectators atop Zurn Hallsit in the shadow of the sunwhile
viewing ^the
annulareclipse on Tuesday.Just after 11:30 a.m., themoon began to cover
the
sun. It
covered the sun, creating theRing of Fire from 1:18 to 1:24p.m.The eclipse was probably thelast of its kind during the 20th
century.
It appears because the moonis too distant to cover the suncompletely.
Merciad Photo/Andy
Shudlich
 
MAY
12,1994
THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Enter
at
your
own
risk
By
Damon Sterling
Merciad
Staff Columnist
If you haven't seen the face, you probably have heard the voiceThe
name is Damon
"STERLS" Sterling,
a young
black male
fixMaryland and a
member of the
Mercy
hurst
Men's
Basketball
Team
I'll be dropping knowledge
to
you in
the
upcoming
year on HipHop/Rap Music
What's hittin\
what's
slippin', what
to purchaand what to
leave
on the
shelf.
Here's
a
copy of my Rating Scale:
IStar:
| I
|Leave it
on
the
shelf.
2Stars:
You may be taking
a
chance with
your hard
earned money.
3 Stars:
There's a few
slammin' cuts.
4 Stars:
The album is slammin'. Good purchase.5
Stars:
The album is phat. You go grab one. Great purchase.
Greai
investmentSo far, '94 has praised us with
a
lot of funk for
our
trunks. This'began with the most anticipated album of Hip-Hop/Rap history:
Snoop
Doggy Dog's "Doggystyle."
When I
first
heard
it,
I
wasn't
really
impressed.
I was
used
to that
East Coast Flava: Onyx, A Tribe Called Quest, Lords of theUnderground, etc... But
a
fellow
teammate
told
me
to just give it
a
chance
and
Idid.I must say, the album is phat.
"It's
the type of album that you can let ride all the way throughwithout fast forwarding one cut This is the type of
album
you canput
on to
get
a
party jumpin'. I give the album
five
stars.For those
who aren't up on
the underground sound, it's
now time
for
me to put you
down. This is
the
type of music
that
gets
no
play
on the
radio,
but you
still
hear about it through word
of mouth. It'sthe music that is not considered mainstream. For example: DasEFX,Illegal, NAS, Redman,
Gang
Starr, etc...This leads
me
to
talk about a
new
group
of Hip-Hop
artist that hit
the scene like a ton of bricks, Wu-TANG Clan. A
group
of eightbrothers from the ghetto of New York City, they bring a totallydifferent flava to Hip-Hop. The album,
"Enter
the Wu-TANG 36Chambers," is so
phat
it should have its own zip code.
The only
way
to
really understand
what
I'm
telling
you
is for you
to
experience the 36 Chambers
yourself.
I give this album 5 stars.
D'
Angelo performance
The
D'
Angelo School
of
Musicwill conclude
the
1993-94 con-cert
seasonjwith
the
D'Angelo
Symphony Orchestra with FrankCollura conducting. The concertwill take place on Sunday, May
15,
at 2:30 p.m. at the CentralHigh School Auditorium,
and will
feature the two first place win-ners
of the 1993
D'Angelo
YoungArtist Competition in Voice.Theresa Santiago, Soprano, re-ceived $10,000 as the first placewinner. She receive
|herIbachelor's and
master's
from
theJuilliard School.
She has been
the
winner
of three
other
voice
com>
petitions. She has performed ex-tensively,
and has had
the leadingroles
in the Ju Ilia
rd Opera The-atre productions.
a
Mezzo-Soprano
Eleni
Matos,likewise
received $10,000 forfirst
placet She received her master'sdegree from
the
University of
II-
linois. She
has
appeared
with
theChicago LyricOpera,
and has
alsobeen among the winners in fivevoice competitions.For the concert, Santiago andMatos will sing arias and duetsfrom seven operas, which include:Carmen, Faust, Samson andDelilah, and Gianni Schicchi.The orchestra will perform thePines of Rome byRespighi,aswell
as the
Triumphal
March
andBallet Music
from Act II of
Aida.The conceit is
free and open
to thepublic. For more information,
callext
2364.
'l
!t
CRUISE SHIP JU*^
Students needed!
Earn
$200CHmoothIy.Summer/hoUdays/RiUtime.
World
travel.Caribbean, Hawaii, Europe, M«nco.flour Guide*, Gift
Shop
Sales, Deck Hand.Casino Workers, etc. No
experience
necessary.
Nine Inch Nails gets religious
By Heather Marshall
i
K
)
Merciad Staff Columnist
Trent
Rezner wa
s set
to
be*gin at around 9:15; it was
9:171
when the lights
 finally
 dimmed.The crowd that
had been
steadilypushing forward, made one big
su
rge toward the front
I
was swept
off my
feet; feeling
only the
bod-ies of those around me holding
me
up.
The
people I
had
come tothe conceit with were separatedfrom
me
instantly.
My chest
wasconstricted and breathing was achore. But
there
they
were
- Nine
Inch
Nails,
on the
stage less than25
 feet
n
 front
 of me,
I was
hav-ing
the
time of my life.As
I
pushed my way back alittle, narrowly missing the heelof
a
Dr. Marten
in
my face, I wasable to recognize the thumpingbeats of
Terrible
Lie" blastingout of the 12 to 15 speakers oneither side of the stage.Banging my
head
in
time
tothe beats, I was at last able to
breathe and take my
 first
 real
look
at the
stage.From behind a transparentsheet,
the
multi-level stage
-
ladenwith lights and smoke
machines
came to life, as the membersslowly began to appear. WhenTrent took the stage, it was pan-demonium.
#A11
-around, mescreams and shrieks were heardand the
lyrics
of the song were
chided along with the
band.Although most of the timewas spent either pushing
off
other
fans
or trying not
to
eat their hair,the show was overpowering. Itincluded
such songs
as
"Down
InIt" and
"Something
I Can NeverHave", which
were so
emotionalthat it moved many
moshers
tostop their
rantic
umping and justsimply listen.
NIN
made sure to blend
some
of their newer
material
withtheir older
stuff,
by playing"Closer",!"Heresy" and a very
loud
and wonderfully violent ver-sion of "March Of The Pigs."
iney also
played "Wish" and"Happiness In Slavery", whichreally
got the
crowd moving and
threw me into the pit
of
mad head
banging
and
bodyslamming.After
a
short
break,
the band
was
cheered back on stage to do a
short
two sing set
of songs off thenew album,
The
Downward Spi-ral.The stage,
combined
withthe impressive lights and smokemachines, really set
the mood
formany of their
powerful?
songs.Many times the lights seemed to
reach out into the crowd and
pullthem deeper into the feeling andpower of the
lyrics and
of
Trent's
voice.
j*
The way the lights and thesmoke worked together to make
some
of the effects
was
amazing.During "Reptile", the combined
use
of
the
smoke that
 filled
he air
and the lights formed a honey-comb design. It was one of themore memorable parts of thecon-cert, both because of the spec-tacle that the lights had formedand the way it made the entireaudience
sit up and take
notice to
the band
and
not just its
music.The final consensus of the
group that I
went
with was
that itwas the concert of the year. Myroommate Terry suffered onlyminor bruises, yet sustained alarge lump on the back of herhead from
a
4
person
riding thecrowd.
This
blow, however, causedher to be pushed over the barprotecting the front stage. Thisknocked the wind out ofther,
shifted herorgans a
bit,
and
caused
her to
almost lose her dinner allover Trent"It was religious," was all shehad to say.
I
have
a
large
bump
on
my
upper arm, but I have plenty ofstories and memories, as do allwho attended, I'm sure. Everytime I hear a NIN song, I canproudly say
that
I survived
the
pit.
Project Look Good:
By
Nick
Krayger
A&E
and
Features Editor
If you turn your
radio
dial to
WMGE
88.5 FM on Tuesday,May
31,
at 6
P.M.,
you might besurprised at what you hear.
Mercy
hurst student RoseMcLaurin is initiating an infor-mative radio program that willprovide youth, ages seven
to
20,with a resource for informationregarding the issues of violence,sex , disease and crime in oursociety.The format of the show is quiteunique. McLaurin personally
plans
to visit
Erie area
middle andhigh schools to collect students'confidential questions, which willbe addressed on the radio pro-gram. Area nurses,
and
membersfrom the health department, willprovide youth with possible an-swers and suggestions to their
areas
of specified concern.McLaurin
 feels
hat,
"kids
needit,
this type
of Rap show,"
where
they can voice their concerns con-fide.ntiaUy. One of her primary
goals is to have
students
"begin
tosee their school
nurse as a
friend;as
a
link
to the proper
agencies".
McLaurin hopes
 for
he
possibil-
ity
of
a
1-800 number eventually.The
 first
woshows,which willair
May 31
and
June
6,
beginning
at 6
P.M. will deal
with the
issuesof sex and sexuality. There is apossibility
that the
air
time
of theshow may change.Those interested in
more
infor-mation about the program, or incontacting Rose McLaurin, call
WMCE at
824-2260.
V
I
I
Happy
iBirth
day
«rp
You've got itgoing on!
We love you !
iYour
roomies, Mary,
Natalie andjenl

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