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The Merciad, Jan. 12, 1995

The Merciad, Jan. 12, 1995

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The Merciad, Jan. 12, 1995
The Merciad, Jan. 12, 1995

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^OM6%NO.
13
MER£THURST,COLLEGE'S;WEEKLY TRIDENT
NEWSPAPER
Janoary
I2,yl995
ioMResidence
Life
Any students interested in learning about becoming
residen
assistants (RAs) should make plans to
attend
a social on Sunday, Jan
22. The
event will offer information
about residence
life
opportuni
ties,expectations
and the
benefits of being
an
RA.
RA
applicationwill be available at the meeting. The event begins at 8 p.m.
in p
Union
and
light refreshments
will be ava
ilable.
Students planning $i
attend should R.S.V.P. by January
20 at extension
2422.
Get ready
|to
recycle
Environmentally Concerned Campus Organizatione decorating recycling containers on Saturday
aften
n the Laker Inn. The containers labeled and
deli
lav. All students are invited to attend. A donation of $pizza
Sharpen those
jblades
Ice
skating hours
are
Monday, Wednesday
and
Friday
from 7:20
untaSfSQf.imaii^tM^
rental is
 free
o
Mercyhurst students.
Skates
can
be
obtained
in tine
game room
of the Union. Skating
hours
are
subject to
change
if thereis
i
scheduled hockey game.
Be a chair person
The
Hotel
Restaurant
and
Institutional Management department isselling chairs for
the
Grotto Dining Room. The
chairs
cost
$60 andcan be
engraved
with
the
buyer's
name and year of graduation, inmemory of someone
or
with
the
name
of
i
company
or
individual.Anyone interested
in
purchasing
a
chair
or
further information cancontact
H
RIM at
extension
2333.
Friday
Breezy and mild with
a
70
I
percent chance
of
showers; highs in the lowHo mid 50s.
/*/
/ /
/
Saturday
Periods of
rain;
lows
in
the mid 30s to lower
40s;
highs
in
the
mid 40sto lower50s,
Sunday
Still more rain;lows in
the
30s;highs in
the
40s,
The Walkers' continue the dream
i
By Craig
Rybczynski
Editor
in
Chief
'j
Mercyhurst College
moved
one
step and
$1
million closer
to
com-pleting
President fWilliam
P.
Garvey's "Continuing
the Dream"Campaign.Twelve-year Board of Trusteemember Dr. Barrett Walker andhis wife, Catherine Walker
of
Eriemade the endowment
to
the col-lege, Monday.Since September, the school hasraised
$4
million
of
the $6.2
mil-lion goal.The donation will fund thebuilding of
the
CatherineMcDonough Walker ResearchCenter and also establish theWalker School of Business.
"I've been
in
business for a
goodmany years and it (the gift) willenhance
die
business school,"
said
Walker.
"It
is
a
good school andwe are trying to make it better.
The money will fund
visitingpro-fessors and
other
outreaches."
Dr.
Walker,
a
Pittsburgh native,moved to Erie in 1956 followinga tour of duty with the US AirForce.
^
£. 13T~Paul is not surprised by theprogress the school has made inreaching
its
goal."Once
he puts his mind
to some-thing
he
gets it done/' he said ofGarvey.
"He did
what
he needed
to
get
to the
next
level."
The
Mercyhurst school of busi-ness currently enrolls 450 stu-dents and was the recipient of
a
$600,000 addition in 1989.
I
McDonough Walker ResearchCenter," Dr. Garvey said. "Heexplained that the 11,000 sq. ftaddition will bring the collegeinto conformity with the Ameri-can Library Association's recom-mendation for
a
college the sizeof Mercyhurst Ground breakingfor
the new
addition
is
projected
for
May 1996
to
coincide
with
thecurrent library's 25th anniver-
"We
are
extremely
gratified
by* *
sa
J
v
n
He
completed
his graduate workat Washington and Jefferson Col-lege and the University of Pitts-burgh School of Dentistry.He has practiced dentistry for20
years
in the
area
and
later
be-
came an investment entrepreneur.
"I
think it is a superb step for-ward for the school and it will
provide
us
with extra
resources tomake the school better," said
Howard
Paul, assistant professorof business.the generosity of Dr. and Mrs.Walker,"
said
Garvey.
"We
havelong dreamt of establishing anendowed School of Business atMercyhurst and the Walker giftwill
make this dream
a
reality."The business department willnot be the only benefactor. The
Hammermill library
will be thesite of
a
new
research
center.
%
u
\i
will
be equally gratifying forus to name our planned library
addition?
the CatherineWalker expressed*
her
ex-treme
satisfaction
with beingassociated with the Sisters ofMercy.
"On
a personal level, I amfond of their heritage whichtraces hack to Ireland, myparent's homeland," she said.
•1
can think of no finer groupof
:
religious, academic andadministrative leaders to beaffiliated with and I amtremendously proud andhonored to lend my name to
Mercyhurst's
new researchcenter."
have
t
In
honor
of
the
birthday of
Dr.
Martin Luther King
Jr.
Monday, January
16,
therewill
be
a
Freedom March downtown.
The
march will
leave from Campus Ministryat
11:15 a.m. and
will
return
by 12:50
p.m. There will
also
be a panel discussion at7 p.m. in Egan Cafeteria based on the book
Makes Me
Wanna
Holler.
 
PAGE
2THE MERCIADJAN.
12,1995
•vOVCtJj>
Security Briefs
Caught
infthe
nick of time
Just prior to the
break,
on Dec 13,
Security
Officers workingstakeouts, in conjunction
with
the Camera Control
Center *
appre-
hended
three non-students
allegedly
preparing to break
into cars on
campus. These
subjects had
pry equipment of
the type
used to breakinto locked doors/trunks,
and
or smash out car windows. Thesuspects were
turned
over
to
the
Erie
Police who
are
investigatingsimilar
crimes all
over town, including
campus
car burglaries whichoccured overnight
on
Dec 8.
. .
.. .
^
Trespassers
apprehended
On Dec
17,
an
Erie police officer apprehended eight teen-agednon-
students who are alleged to have broken
into
the Campus
AthleticCenter. A
VCR was
taken,
and recovered by
the officer.
The
eight
youths
were turned over
to die
Erie.
Pol
ice.;.fttggf
%•$%
-i*.
f|S,
f
v iu$9 **,c&*.b>i2d>0
_
«r,
1 v< V
diSa^i^^?
k
"Baby Jesus" recovered
During the break, security recovered an angel, and the ceramic
"baby
Jesus" that
had
been
taken
from Christmas displays. Theseobjects
are
considered college property,
and
the persons
known
tohave had them in their possession will be
cited
by the Dean ofStudents
as
outlined in the Student Handbook.
#
The student who
tot
down an eight
loot Norway Spruce jrom
theside
yard at
4008 Briggs
and
took it home
for a Christmas tree
wasidentified. The student
indicated
he
had been drinking and did
it asa prank. He will be charged forreplacement,as well as facingdisciplinary
action by
Dean William Kennedy.
r
Stolen property
found!
Bud
Dever, Security Director, said that the Millcreek Police haveapprehended
car burglars
who specialized in taking stereo/radio
equipment
from vehicles,
and
have recovered
a large amount
of thestolen property. Mercyhurst students who
ba$l such
kerns
taken
inthe December
car
burglaries should contact
Lt.Rjcbard Figaski
atMillcreek P.D., 833-7777,
and
inquire if
any
of
the recovered
goodswas
taken'from their
cars. In Erie,
J}etectives workings
on theMercyhurst cases were pulled off because of a rash of homicides,and it is unknown
if they
had any success or time to question thepeople our security apprehended
on
campus. Victims of
our
crimesshould contact Detectives Skindell or
Starks
at the Erie P.D.Detective Division, to follow
up
on their losses.It's time for Mercyhurst stu-
dents to
trade in their jeans
and
T-
shirts
for more formal attire.The Mercyhurst community
will
get formal
at
Sabella's UnionStation, Friday, January 27.The Winter Formal will begin
at
7 p.m. and conclude
at 1
a.m.Shuttles will be provided
to and
from
the
event
-Winter
Formal
'95
will differfrom forma
Is
of
the
past becauseof
the
addition of a buffet dinner,served at 7:30 p.m.
The
full course meal
is
includedin
the
$15 price
tag
that
is
affixedto the formal this-winter, a $7increase
 from
ast year.
Co-Chairperson
Matt Adamsbelieves the increase is justified.
"Last year
the students got chipsand dip and this year for just $7more they get an entire meal,*
9
he
said.
The buffet menu includes: bone-less stuffed chicken, four cheeselasagna, mixed veggies, parsleybuttered potatoes and assorted
dinner
rolls.Beverages will also be servedwith dinner. They are: iced tea,tea, coffee and water.A
cash
bar
will
open from 7 to7:30 p.m. and will reopen afterthe dinner.Despite the controversy sur-rounding the dinner, Co-Chair-
person
Sta cey
Fi tzpatrick sa
id theformal will
be
a barometer forfuture formals.
"If
the idea doesn't
work
I willsuggest
to
the people
who run
thespring to go back to the way itused to
be,"
she said.The music and entertainmentwill come courtesy of WMCE's
Jim
Bean.
a
Tickets for the
gala event
are to
go
on
sale January
19 and will
besold until the 26th.Both Adams and
Fitzpa
tricksaid that
die
event is not to belooked upon as a
"couple's
onlyevent," but
quite die
contrary.
"We're
not
trying
to make itlike
a
prom, we just want every-one to make a good time," saidFitzpa trick.
*"We
want
to make
this
a
classevent,"
added
Adams.
av
;."
r
'•'.-
>•'- - *
'^i_
t -J
>s«
r^kjidi
1 1
By Anne
L.
McNelis
Copy Editor
Treasurer Darrin Tovtin
an-
nounced that MSG received anunqualified
audit.-'That
means/they didn't
.find
anything wrongwith"
the
MSG budget for
the
lastfiscal year. Tovtin added that it
was the
 first
ime the body had
anunqualified audit in three years*
Shimeksaid
the College
"was
veryhappy there was an unqualifiedaudit"
I
**
t.
Secretary Jessica Cuffia
said
theSenate made recommendations
for changes to the Strategic
Plan.These recommendations! have
Jjeen/sent to,the
Board of Trust-
Iees*»
aa.^J^iuf^.istf.
I
Cuffia also announce^ thatWellness Day is scheduled forThursday,
March
23.
Anyone
in-
terested in helping with the daycan contact Cuffia.
***•
.
jf
'
Sophomore Rep. Jenna
Heyl
resigned romher position,
Cu f
i
 a
said. Vice-President
Kris ten Hurd kj
r
sairstS^iir^^criA^1re1fl%^
ing
sophomore "reps
regarding
aM
replacement*
**
-
SAC Chair Rich Straub said
her]expects
to have
some
information
f*j
about the specifics of the mascotby early next week. He also en-'couraged students to attend sport-ing events
fin
support ofMercyhurst athletes;
Straub
said
-there are always
people
at games
'when there is
a spirit'contest
in-volving
a
cash prize,
but "I
don't*?!
Understand why
Wfc'have
to
pay $
students to come to games that
are free."
I
Senior
Rep.
Erin McGuinnessraised the issue of absences atSenate meetings. Student Sena-tor Cuffia said that students aregenerally
good I
about attendingmeetings
and that it is other
mem-
t>ers"6^tt^Sehate (faculty
andadministration) who
miss
meet-
ingsfThere
i
have been Senate|' meetings
th
is
y ea r
at which votescould
not be taken
because therewas
not a
quorum.
-•»•
Senior
Rep.
Matt Adams saidhe spoke with Senate PresidentBarbara Behan,
who told him
that
she
is willing
to
talk
to reps aboutthe attendance problem at Senate
meetings. Adams is going to speak
with Behan aga
in
to find out
moreinformation
and
will get back toMSG about it
j
ECCO begin recycling program
MAC card stolen
Security
is
investigating
the
theft
and
unlawful
use
of
a MAC card
from an apartment on Briggs Avenue. Bud Dever
says that
the
theft
occured just prior to the holiday break
and
the thief
was able
to drain
the owner's account
of more
than
$500
when he
acquired
the
code
which was with the
card. A
strong
suspect
has been
developed
andthe
case will be
worked with the Erie Pol
ice.A follow
up a rrest can
be made when all the information
has
been acquired. Dever, onceagain reminds
students not
to leave money, creditcards,or valuablejewelry unattended in open apartments because of such crimesbeing common place on college campuses.By Grace
Lukawskli
Merciad Contributing Writer
\
The members of the Environ-mentally
Concerned Campus
Or-
ganization
(ECCO), in coordina-tion with the administration, houa*
ing and
maintenance will begin acampus wide recycling programthis Saturday, Jan. 14.At 4 p.m., ECCO will meet inthe Union to label and decoraterecycling containers. Distribution
should
begin around 8 p.m.Every office on campus willreceive a blue
wastebasket
andevery dorm room and apartmentwill receive
a
box. Glass, alumi-
num
and paper (GAP)
will be
put
into
these. The containers will inturn be emptied into the
white
recycling
dumpsters
on campus,located
behind
Mercy
200 and
on
the •
Briggs side of the parkingramp.There
will also be
blue gar-bage cans in Old Main, SullivanHall, Zurn Hall, D'Angelo, theUnion, the Athletic Center,
in the
laundry rooms
of
he three Mercyapartments and in the lobbies ofthe dorms.These
will
be labeled. All stu-dents are invited to help ECCO
with
the labeling
and
distributionon Saturday.Remember that the whitedumpsters and the blue garbagecans are for
recyclables
only.
ngratulattons
to
the
students
who
were named to the 1995 edition of Who's
Who
Among StudentsKristafKivilo. Jennifer
Kochanek.
Jennfer Lowe
 
JAN.
12,1994
THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
IN DEFENSE
OF
P.B.S.
Anne M. Schleicher
Features IA&E
editor
Well
it's
a
new year,
with
new goals, new dreams,
new
hopes
andmost significantly
a
new Congress. Wait,
don't turn
the
page. You
are
in
fact still
on the Arte
and
Entertainment
page.
And
yes
you
did?just lead
something relating
to
politics.
It
is
important to realize thatwhether you vote or not, get involved
or not,
even like it or not,politics creeps
into
your everyday lives
more than you
can imagine.This
104th Congress
is
significant,
as
you
probably
already know,because it's the
 first
ime in 40 years
that
we have
a
Republicanmajority in
the
House
ofRepresentatives.
With
mis
shift
in
powerwill
come
a shift in the agenda put before the Congress.
The
Republican
party wants
to instill what they
have called their
Con-tract with America. Like* most
contracts,'this
Contract withAmerica may seem to be
 fruitful
 upon
 first
 glance, however it is
upon
close examination of the
 fine
 print when nasty inconsistenciesand inconveniences
pop up.
One
of
the
changes that
the
Republican party,
with
Speaker Newt
Gingrich at
the helm, wants
to make
is
in
the amount of funding thatis allocated for public broadcasting. Gingrich claims that there
is a
need to eliminate this
"liberal-bent
media". Yet along with thismedia, in the form of National PublicRadio,many
other types
ofworthy
and
stimulating programming
have
the
potential
to
get lost
in
this budget cutting crisis. Public
broadcasting,
through
its private
and
federal sponsorship,
unlike
advertising
funded
broadcasting,
is
able
to bring
a
unique
and
much needed alternative
to the
informa-tion superhighway
that
is setting
up shop in our
very own backyards.Without public broadcasting we, the public, lose
a
rich source ofculture and intellectual dialogue. We lose a forum in which todiscuss and learn to appreciate
different
i viewpoints. It is this*.. freedom of ntellect
that has held
a
strong place
in
the history of ournation.
It is
important
that this
liberty not be eliminated.It is important
 to
 realize
that
the founders of this great
nation
ofours intended
 freedom
 of thought
to
be a
focal point of our politicalvexistence. One.
could
look to the
Federalist
Papers,
number 10specifically, to see this idea mentioned. Madison writes:
The
diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights ofproperty originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to auniformity of interests.
Hie
protection of these faculties is thefirst
obj
ect
of go vernmen t ~Hie
regulation of these
various
andinterfering interests forms
the
principal
task
of modern legisla-tion and involves the spirit of party and faction
in
the
necessaryoperations of
government.
99
Modern interpretation
of
this task
of government
is
evident
in
this
present public broadcasting debate. Public broadcasting providesthe
 forum
n which ideas, music,
art and
culture
are
expressed and
|
of the viewpoints
but
it
is
111
shared. Yes
you may
disagree
with s<
important mat these viewpoints have the ability to be heard andconsidered. Modern protection is often a matter of economics.Without funding the
future
of public broadcasting is shaky
at
bestThus
it is
essential that the federal government
not
lose sight of itsf keeping alive the diversity
country what it
is.
Lights
j
*
ms mi
rTSflr. W'^
*•**
9
ameraculture!
Anne
ML
Schleicher
Features!
A&E
editor
The
Winter'95
Films
For
Dis-cussion Series, produced
by
Pro-fessor George Garrelts,
kicked
off
this
past Tuesday
at Zurn
Au-
ditorium with the allowing
of
SixDegrees of Separation,
a filmbased on
the
John
Gaure play ofthe same name and starringStockard dunning, DonaldSutherland,
and
Will Smith.
jLThe
next
four Tuesdays can
hespent enjoying several
 films
hatwill probably be unavailable atany other venue
in
the area. Filmsinclude
Manufacturing
Consent,Eat\
Drink Man Woman, LittleBuddha,
and
Fresh.
Next week's film is
Fresh,
thestory of a 12
year
old
ghetto boywho sometimes runs drugs butalsolikes school.
He
also likes hisfiither,
a
street speed
chess player
who is forbidden to see-Fresh.Fresh puts chess strategies,learned from his father, into
op-
eration on thestreet,with dra-matic results. Directed by BoazYakim, this 1994 film is spon-sored by the Mercyhurst Minor-
ity
Students with
an
introduction
and
discussion
lead
by
OnjanetteJackson
and
Terence
Gee.
Heather Marshall
Merciad Columnist
\\
II
They say that New York is thebig apple and Cleveland's theplum. Although
I'm
not reallysure what that means, and if itreally is a
compliment,
that's
where I live. Ask anyone who
»ws
me well,
and
they will tell
you
that I
have
endless praise
forwhat most people lovingly call,
the
mistake
on the
lake.
Cleveland
has
come a long
wayfrom being the brunt of
many
badjokes
and
that fateful river-catch-ing-on-fire mishap. Cleveland is
die
ideal city for people with vary-ing
tastes
and interests.
And
whatbetter city for us, students atMercyhurst to get away to andexperience a bigger city atmo-sphere
for the
day, night
or even
aweekend. JIf you enjoy going
to
see shows,Geveland has many small, bar-type venues, with the most widely
visited*and
well-known being:Peabody's Down Under,Peabody's Cafe, the Odeon, theGrog Shop and the Agora. Atthese venues one can see manyeclectic local bands,
such
as;
Cowsin the Graveyard, Odd Girl Out,First Light, or the Twist-Offs.Other, more well-known bandssuch
as
Helmet,
Hole
and
James,
have also
made their appearancesrecently. Nine Inch Nails camehome to Geveland to give resi-dents a late Christmas gift, byplaying a surprise show at the
Odeon
for
$5.00
a
ticket,
with
allproceeds going
to
charity.Cleveland
also
has
many largervenues, which double as sportsarenas. Now, what article aboutCleveland lately would be com-
HOLD
THAT THOUGHT
pi
ete without mentioning
the
newsports complex? Just this pastsummer, Cleveland christenedJacob'sField,
which wasto be
the
home
of the Geveland Indians.
If
the players resolve their differ-ences in time for the season tobegin, no visit
to
Geveland willbe complete without
at
least try-ing to see
a
game. Adjoining thebaseball field,
is the new home
of
die
Cavs, Gund Arena. These twofe
complexes
add
life
to
an area
thatwas dying
and give the
city some-thing
to be
proud
of.If
you
enjoy shopping at un-usual
or
unique places, there aremany choices in Cleveland.Tower City in downtown Geve-land is located in
the
lower
levelof the Terminal Tower. It wasnewly reconstructed just aboutfive years
ago.
Inside there
are
thetypical stores
such
as
the Gap
and
die
Limited, but there are alsomany other
specialty
shops. Somemore interesting stores are The
Body
Shop,
The Nature
company,
and
a
J
Crew store.
There are alsov many
extreme shops specializingin specific Hems, such as storesdealing only in different socks,
items
found
in
museums
and
oneentire store filled
with
purses.For more original shops, onemust travel to the east
side'of
Geveland, to Coventry. Coven-
try is
actually
a
street,
with
manytrendy, unique stores, restaurantsand coffee [shops. While there,one should visit such stores asPassport
to
Peru,
 filled
 with tap-estries, wool sweaters
and
^un-usual jewelry. Another good placeto visit is RecordRevolution,where
you can find
just about anyconcert
T-shirt
they make,
as
wellas unique clothes and
music
Atrip to Coventry Would not becomplete without stopping inTommy's, a health consciousres-taurant which caters to vegetar-ians,
but is also very good
to meat-eaters (If you go, order
hummus j$
with an extra pita!). After that,make
your
way down the street,to
Arabica
for
a
cafe mocha,
see
a
The MercyhurstTheater DepartmentPresents
WORKING
Films
•:•?•
introduc-tion
it
7p.m.
Tickets
tie
freethe
Meicyhuret
Community a$3
 for
he general public.
a
musical
based
on
the
novel by
Studs Turkel
1
at the Mercyhurst Taylor Theater
g January*20-22
&
27-29J
Free
to^Mercyhurst
Community?
CALL
824-2401
movie at the Centrum or walk
across
the street
to
the
Grog Shopto see
a
band.Cleveland is probably mostwidely known for its bars. Eventhose who might have never beento Cleveland, have heard of theFlats. The
Flats
really does havesomething
 for
 everyone, whether
it be
a
place to simply
drown your
sorrows in beer, drown
your
sor-rows and eat, or drown
your
sor-rows and dance. The best places
to
eat
in
the
Flats
are
BW-3
*s,
theSpaghetti Warehouse andShooter's. For dancing in the
•}
Flats, my favorite places
to go
are
the
Smart
Bar and
Trilogy which
both
play really good alternativedance music. On Sundays, Tril-ogy becomes "The Church",where they play all Techno mu-
sic,
improve the lighting
and pack'em
in. Other dance bars in theFlats include Rumrunner's, whichis primarily filled with highschoolers and plays top-40, dancemusic.The Flats has many comedy
clubs and also
an outdoor concertfhall.
Cleveland is only 90
minutes fromErie,
and
it holds
a
special fond-ness
in
my heart
So
if Mercyhurstever really
rustrates
 you,
and
youneed to get away, but
not
home,give
 tile
 Plum
a try.
- f f
Anne
M.
Schleicher
Features/A&E editor
i
The Mercyhurst Crew team,
with new
head coach
Sean
Tobin,formerly of Colgate College, willbe putting down their oars andpicking up spatulas for two
up-
coming weekends. On January
20,21,27,28
and possibly
the
22
and 29
as well.
The team will turnthe Cove
into their
very
own pizzaparlor in
order
to
raise
funds fortheir upcoming
spring
break
trip
to
Augusta, GA.The secret recipe for
 tine
 up-
coming
aale has
been provided bySophomore
Mark Erie
whose fa-ther owns and operates TJ.'sPizza of Meadville, PA.
Mark
isthe roomate of Chuck Andras, asophomore rower.A large cheese and pepperonipizza with a hand tossed crustwill cost
$5.00
including freedelivery
across campus
and
from
Briggs
Avenue
to
Parade
Street
When asked how she
 felt
 about
r
*
die idea
of
the
men's
team
cook-
ing, sophomore
Jean<McFeelyfrom
Brockville, Ontario,
said
thatshe was excited:
It's
aboutbloody time* I
can't
cook,
it's ad thing they are."
E
Call-in
telephone orders
will
beaccepted. Look for the phonenumber to call on soon-to-be-posted fliers.
Hill

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