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The Merciad, Feb. 2, 1995

The Merciad, Feb. 2, 1995

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 2, 1995
The Merciad, Feb. 2, 1995

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/a*
-
68
 
NO.46*MERCYHURST COLLEGE'SLEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER FEBRUARY
2.A995
fe
'
Dance for Brendon
On Friday, Feb.
3,
a
dance
will be held to benefit BrendonThompson, a leukemia
patient
who recently underwent a bonemarrow transplant. The dance
will be held in
the
Mercy
hurst
CollegeCafeteria beginning at 8 p.m. Music will be provided by OldiesExpress, disk jockey Frank Rizzone.
Food and pop
will
be
provided.There will also be a Chinese auction with prizes such as theatretickets,
artworks
and
dance
lessons.
Tickets
are
$5
for students
and
$10 for all others
and
are available at Campus Ministry and
at
thedoor.
SAC activities
SAC
is
sponsoring
the
Dating Game
on
Friday,Feb.
3
at 7
p.m.
inZurn Recital Hall. Contestants will be chosen from applications
made
by
students earlier this
week.
SAC
will
host
The
Crow
on Saturday, Feb.
4
at
9
p.m. The moviewill be in Zurn Recital Hall.
*
fThe SAC Coffeehouse on Wednesday, Feb.
8,will
feature the
music
of
Chris
and
Johnny.
f
A gay lecture
MSG
will host
Rick Burd,
who
will speak on
the
sensitive
issues
surrounding homosexuality. Burd takes a comic approach to
his
lectures. He will be in Sullivan Hall
at
8 cm.
on
Tuesdav. Feb. 7.
Sports
on
WMCE
I Women's basketball hosts
Pitt-Johnstown this
Friday,
Fel
7:30
p.ra.The
game will be broadcast on WMCE-88.5
FM1
ning with a
pre-game
show at 7:20 pan. The hockey team
Elmira
on Saturday,Feb.5.
WMCE-88.5
FM
begins coveragegame
at
7:20 p.m.
Sharpen thoseblades^
I Ice Skating hours
this
week are: Sunday
from
12:35 p.m. until
||t5
p.a£
and
Monday, Wednesday,
and
Friday
from
7:20 p.m.until
&S0pan£.
m
I
if
I
&
Ml
Friday
Mix of cloudsand sun; highs in theupper 20s.
Saturday
Chance
of
snow;?lows 10 -20;
:
highs in the 20s.
Sunday
Snowtapering;
*iows
10 -20;
highs in the 20s.
ffTOfc,
___
.
a
 
.* <
Mercyhurst not on-line
By Craig
Rybczynski
Editor
in
Chief
A student
tries
to print a termpaper
in
the main computer
lab
ofOld Main, but to
his/her
disgustand anger the printers are notworking.
This is
not
a rarity
at MercyhurstCollege but almost an everydayoccurrence.Senior Mike
Brown
poignantlycommented on the state of com-puters on campus."Most of
the
times
the
comput-ers
don't work and
the
small
com-puter
lab is
so
slow," Brown said.
"Wednesday
night I
had
to go tothree
different
computers in orderto print. Also the printers were
broken
and the lab assistantsdidn't know how
to
fix them."Brown addressed two impor-tant points about
the labs
on cam-pus.The first is the lack of staffmembers and the second is thescarcity of high-tech printers.
"We
need better quality print-ers,
"
said Matthew Turner. "Myfriends at other print schools havelaser printers."Other private schools not onlyhave printers, they also have acomputing
staff.
According to Dr. Mario Diaz,Director of
the?Physics
Depart-ment,
in
his proposal
to
organizethe computer
and
media resourcesat Mercyhurst, GustavusAdolphus College (in Minne-sota) has better organization.They currently employ eightfoil-time people
in the
academiccomputing department.The Academic ComputingCommittee, formed
a
year
ago
tohandle the problem, serves only
an
advisory function.
Each
department is representedin
the
committee."Our goal is to assist facultyany way we can and purchasecomputers
and them in
the
class-room," said Dr. Donald Platte,Professor of Mathematics. "Wemake academic recommendations
to
the dean."According to ChairpersonPlatte, the members include: Dr.Jim Hood (Humanities), MikeBarnes (HRIM), Dr. MichaelFederici (Social Sciences), PeterLibra (Education Division), ScottMcAuley (Business), KathyWeidenboerner (Human Ecol-
ogy),
Diaz (Sciences) and Dr.Michael McQuillen.
|
However,
as
Diaz
writes
in
hisproposal,
that
the coordination ofcomputer facilities is not orga-nized."The current state of
affairs
atMercyhurst is somehow anar-chic," he writes. "There is
a
lackof coordination among differentexisting computer labs."
On
campus there
are
numerousfacilities.
In Old
Main there are three com-puterabs,one modern
lab
inZurn.The Human Ecology, ,RIAP,
CMIS .departments
and the
Merciad
have
computers.Some faculty members
say
thatthe committee needs to includeoutside
imputOne
such
professor is
Dr. NancyEichelsdorfer (Director of mi-crocomputer center
and
assistantprofessor of computer systems).She said, "There are
computer
labs all over campus and all arenot the same.
"It
is
not coordinated
and
I think
mittee
is expanded it will help,"she said.The committee has proposals in
the
works.First, Diaz
has
suggested
hiring
a
Director of Academic Comput-
ing, who
would help
in the main-tenance of the facilities and theselecting of
a
paid staff.?He also suggests installing sixmultimedia machines in the li-brary
and
further networking theInternet system
and
E-ma
U
to in-
clude
all students.The
current
situation among stu-dents is one of frustration.
.*
According to Hood, he con-ducted a survey in one of hisclasses and the general reactionwas that they felt the facilitieswere inadequate and studentswere not getting their money'sworth.
Students
are
charged $75
a year
to
use
the
limited facilities.At
Gannon
University, a full-time
student pays $50 per year
fora technology fee.This allows them access to 50
PCs,
25 Macintosh's
and
all theperipherals used by the comput-ers,according
to Chad
Ferencak,
Gannon PC
Lab
System Admin-istrator*At Mercyhurst, according toEichelsdorfer, there
are
28 com-
puters in the main lab in Old
Mainand nine in each of the smallerlabs.
*
Diaz
and
his staff have
thus
faradded
Internet
and
the AcademicComputing Committee's proposal
.
is
a
positive step.But with the search for
a
new
dean
in progress
and
all proposalsgoing through the dean's
office
the school
may
fall
farther
behindiftheAcademicComputingCom-
,-„ the
computer age.
$2
Million donated
to
Mercyhurst
Two Erie residents, both mem-bers of the Mercyhurst College
board
of trustees, have
each
con-tributed $1 million gifts to the
college's
private campaign,"Con-tinuing
the
Dream."
|
Their gifts totaling $2 millionwill
be
used
toward the construc-tion of
the
planned Concert Hall
on the
Mercyhurst campus. Bothgifts
were
given
with
the
stipula-tion
that
the donors remain anony-mous.Mercyhurst President Dr. Will-
iam P.
Garvey noted with enthu-
siasm that
the
million dollar
giftscame from two Erieites.
"It's
afine example of the kind of civicgenerosity that Erie has alwaysneeded it
to
develop outstandinginstitutions," Garvey said.
pThe
announcement of
these
two
anonymous gifts comes threeweeks after Mercyhurst College
trustee
Dr. Barrett
C.Walker,
also
of Erie, and his wife Catherine,contributed
$19 million*to
theMercyhurst campaign.Gary L. Bukowski, vice presi-dent of nstitutional advancement,who is directing the campaign,said
that
these latest million dol-lar anonymous gifts will ensurethe construction of an enlargedConceit Hall projected
to cost $3.2
million, including equipment.
|
The college expects to breakground in April, 1995, and havethe building completed by Feb.1996.Mercyhurst
has
long
dreamt
ofan
enlarged/concert
hall to en-hance the cultural activities of hecollege, particularly in the per-forming arts. CurrentlyMercyhurst
uses
its
Zurn
RecitalHall, built in 1968, and the TaylorLittle Theatre, built in 1953, forits music, dance and theatrepro-ductions.
"Those
facilities seat only 250people each and were built for aschool of 500,"
Garvey
said, "ourenrollment today is
2,467
stu-dents, and this space limitationforces
us to
go
off-campus
whenwe sponsor major productions,"he said.
"|
Plans for
Mercyhurst's
newconcert hall call for convertingthe present Zurn
Recital Hall into
a 900-seat auditorium, with 640seats on the main
level and
250seats in
the
balcony, including sixprivate boxes.The concert hall will
be
locatedon Mercy hurst's back campus andwill
connect*with
two existingfacilities, Zurn Hall to its north
and
the
D'Angelo
School of Mu-sic to its east.
"With these
latest two gifts, we
are nearing
the
$5 million
mark
inthe campaign to raise $6 million
by June 30,1995,
w
Bukowski
said."The support from friends andsupporters of the college
has
beenabsolutely gratifying," Bukowskisaid.
 
PAGE
2THE MERC) ADFEB.
2,1995
Security Briefs
Student arrested forimpersonating an officer
A resident assistant was arrested for impersonating
a
publicofficial, namely
an
officer of the Pennsylvania Liquor ControlEnforcement, as
a
result of
an
incident
that ocurred
in
December
According to
Director
of Security Bud Dever, state police made
die
arrest and
a
hearing has been scheduled. Additional informa-tion was not available.
Cassette player thiefs still atlarge
Some
time
after
night classes
on
Jan.
18 and
classes
during
the
day
pn
Jan.
19,
two video cassette players were stolen from
Zurn
Hall,Rooms 207
and 314.
Persons disabled the cable/restraining deviceand removed the cassette player. This is the third cassette player
stolen since last
September, depleting the cassette player pool. Thecassette players
from Zurn are
Samsung
models,
serial numbers
are
6RBD404537 and
62LS503311.
Both are engraved
Mercy
hurstCollege Media Services.
In
conjunction with those
thefts,
a
security
guard
who was
locking
Zurn Hall
heard noises
in the
third floor area, and, upon investiga-
tion,
discovered two
males who
fled
down
the
stairs
and
out the ea
st
door
of Zurn. They disappeared in the
Townhouses
area. A VCRwas found to have been tampered with in an apparent effort toremove it
from
the restraining device. Erie Police and CampusSecurity have been provided with complete descriptions. Both
subjects*were
college age, but it is undetermined if they areMercy hurst students
as
of this writing.
Scale stolen
An electronic
scale,
TARE model,
8" x
10", and
about
11/2*
tall
wasremoved, and believed
stolen,
from Zurn
105.
This scale could be
used
to weigh
drugs,
and
is worth about
$700.
It was
last
seen
Jan.16th
after
classes,
and
discovered missing
on
Jan.
17
at about
10:30
ajn.
Students 'bagged' by Security
office foyer. All property was returned and the offending studentswere referred to the Dean of
Students
for discipline.
Refrigerator
raided
A person or persons unknown entered
an
apartment in
south
BriggsAvenue,
and
removed about
$20
worth
of food. The occupants were
not
sure
the
door was locked,
but
also
indicate a
former tenant mayhave lost
a
key for
the
apartment, and requested
a
lock change.
Wallet
lost,
bag recovered
A wallet containing about $290
in cash
and
check,
credit cards
and
other
items,
was stolen
from a
shopping
bag in
the
cafeteria.
A
workstudy who was working
at
an
off campus party left
the
wallet with
her
change of
clothes
in
the
bag
near a
coat rack used by cafeteriaworkers. Within an hour somebody had come by and taken thewhole bag, which was found in front of
Main,
and turned intosecurity, without
the
wallet. Anyone having seen
a
person discardthe white, cloth bag,
"Limited
Express"
brand <
Friday, Jan. 6,between 5:45 and 6:30 p.m. in front of
Main,
please contactSecurity.
Security
cracks!down
on unregistered vehicles
Students who have failed to register their vehicles and properlydisplay a campus registration sticker are running the
 risk
 of big finesbeing assessed
to
their student
accounts.
Time has
been allowed forstudents who have returned from the holiday break with cars they
didn't have in
September,
to
register. Tickets will
be
issued withoutwarning starting
this
week.
Unanswered tickets will be forwardedto
the
business office where fines will be assessed
to
the student'saccount.
Unpaid
fines or other costs will
cause a
student's transcript
to
be held up.By Anne
L.
McNelis
Copy Editor
"Some reps are in a lot
of troublefor attendance,"
said
MSG Secre-tary Jessica
Cuffia
at Monday'smeeting. She
said,f "More <than
enough (reps)
have two
unexcused
absences."
1
'A
rep with threeunexcused absences is asked toresign from his or
her
position.An unexcused absence occurs
when a rep does
not contact
CufBa
prior
to
a meeting
or does not
finda replacement. Cuffia remindedreps that if they cannot attend ameeting, they should find some-one else within their class to at-tend in their place. "You'remarked present if
you
have some-one to replace
you,"
she said.Sophomore Michelle Mizia waselected to fill the open
sopho-
more rep position. She took heroffice
monday
nightTreasurer
Darrin
Tovtin askedfor nominations for juniors
to as-
sist in the planning of the SeniorDinner Dance. Two juniors are
needed
to
co-chair
the
event withTovtin and Senior Norma Telega.MSG Adviser
Cass Shi me
k
ex-
plained that the junior
and
senior
co-chairs
work together to planthe dance
and
the juniors
"kind
of
take over
the
night of the
dance
to
allow the seniors to enjoy them-
selves.''
Cecil
ie
Mori
an and KatieMcGlynn were nominated Mon-day night. Tovtin
said
he will takenominations until Friday,
Feb.
3.
Reps
will vote next week.
SAC
Chair
Rich Straub said
the
drawings
for the
mascot costume
have
arrived. They will be posted
outside
the
SAC office
so
anyoneinterested may look
at
them.President George Paydock dis-cussed the Spring Festival. Hesaid the Festival Committee isplanning to hold other activitiesto supplement the money raisedthrough the Festival. Proceedsfrom the
Festival
and other ac-tivities will benefit the BrendonThompson fund. Thompson is aleukemia patient who recentlyunderwent a bone marrow trans-plant.A dinner will be held the nightbefore the Festival, Friday, April
28.
Paydock plans to invite ErieMayor Joyce
Savocchio
and Penn-sylvania Governor Tom Ridge tothe dinner.Paydock said the Committeeexpects
help
from the housing of-fice
and
from
the
Senate as
well asBy Amy Hardner
Merciad
Staff
Reporter
Over the past two weeks
blue
recycling bins have
appearedin
Mercyhurst apartment buildingsor throughout the halls on cam-
pus.
All of these containers weredistributed by ECCO (Environ-mentally Concerned Campus Or-ganization) during its campus-wide recycling kickoff Saturday,
Jan.
14. ECCO was formed thisyear to promote environmentaleducation and awareness on cam-
pus as
well
as to
help
instill envi-ronmentally sound habits in stu-
dents,
faculty
and
staff members.Grace Lukawski, President ofECCO, said she is genuinelypleased with the progress of therecyclingprogram.However, shedid say, "The process is goingslower than we originally antici-pated; some minor
details t
thatwere overlooked are
being taken
care
of."
She also expressed the
club's
appreciation
to
the campuscommunity for their
patience
and
support for the recycling project.Due to such a large campuswide program there
has been
someconfusion as to what and how torecycle.
Here are some
remindersand tips on how to recycle onMercyhurst Campus.Residential students are asked
to dump
all
glass,
aluminum,
and
paper
products
in
the
white
recy-cling dumpsters. One is locatedbehind the Mercy Apartmentbuildings
and the
other
is
behind
the
parking
ramp.
Another whitedumpster
will,'be
provided forNorth Briggs.Students living in the dormscan put their recyclables in thebig
blue
bins located
in
the dorm
hallways. Little blue garbage canswill be distributed to all faculty
and
staffoffices and
since
there
is
a shortage of cleaning
staff,
ECCOfrom other clubs and organiza-tions
on
campus.'"Hopefully, by the next twoweeks, we'll have a lot of thingsfinalized, Paydock
said,
"We
have
a
lot of very
big
expectations. Weneed
a
lot of
help."
Students
inter-ested in helping
with
the Festivalshould call the Festival hotline atextension 2090.Tovtin thanked Winter FormalCo-Chairs Stacey Fitzpatrick andMatt Adams for their
work
in
plan-
ning the event. Fitzpatrick
said
the
Formal went very well.Freshman rep ChrisHerbolsheimer said students liv-ing
in the
Duval apartments haveexpressed concern over the factthat the nearest dumpster to theapartments has been moved.Herbolsheimer said the students
now
have
to
walk farther to throw
out
their
garbage.
Shi me k
said,
This is good
feed-
back,"
because maintenance hasbeen trying some new things re-garding the
placement
ofdumpsters around campus.MSG meetings are held everyMonday night
at
8:30 p.m. in theGovernment Chambers of theUnion. All students are welcometo attend.asked all faculty and staff o emptytheir bins into the nearest recy-cling container located through-out
the
halls.
Any paper productsthat
are dry and
clean
(written onor colored) can be recycled ex-cept those that are gloss or waxcovered.If anyone has questions, con-
cerns
or comments concerning therecycling program they can callGrace Lukawski at 455-4885,Greg Troyer at 824-6918, ChrisJurusik at ext. 2968 or JenLaRoche at ext. 2984.Anyone
interested
in joining orvolunteering their services toECCO or just concerned aboutthe environment should attend theECCO meeting
next.week
onWednesday,
Feb.
8 at
8:45
p.m. in
Main
206.
The club
is looking for
a
strong underclassmen member-
ship to keep the orga ni za
tion alive
in the
future.
Students to attend conference
The Criminal Justice HonorSociety, Alpha Phi Sigma, andthe Criminal Justice Club aresponsoring
a trip
to Boston,
Mass.
to attend
the
Academy of Crimi-nal Justice Sciences Conventionand the coinciding National Al-pha Phi Sigma Meeting. ,This has been an annual eventfor the students of
the
club. Theconvention
has
\
more
than
300
different
speakers
and
panels thisyear. The students are given theopportunity to meet
distinguishedmembers within
the
criminal
jus-
tice field, including the authors
of
their textbooks.
This
year,
two
of
'the
students,Melanie Songer andCathy Wheeler, and faculty, Dr.Frank Hagan, Dr. Pete Benekos,and Dr. Thomas
O'Connor
arepresenting papers at this year'sconference.
Members
of both organizationsare attempting
to
raise money byconducting fundraisers
such
as:
abake
sale,
50/50 raffle, and
sub-
marine sandwich sales in hopesof offsetting the costs. Any con-
tributions Or dona tions towa id a
nyof these fundraisers
will
be greatlyappreciated.For additional informationplease contact Advisor ShirleyWilliams at ext 2266.
 
FEB.
2,1995
THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Shakespeare film fest
Anne M. Schleicher
FeatureslA&E
editor
To
go or not to go, that is thequestion, The Shakespearefilm fest is
the
answer.
On
Feb.
10-12,1995Mercyhurst
College will sponsor
a
Shakespeare Film Festival in Zurn
Auditorium.
*
Two films will beshown on Friday and Saturdayand one on Sunday.This
film
fest differs fromtraditional fests in
that
it repre-sents Shakespeare's drama inthree diverse genres: movie,opera, and ballet, all captured onreel to reel.The list of films includes:Kenneth Branagh's
Much
AdoAbout
Nothing,
and GiuseppeVerdi's opera
Othello,
which willbe shown on Friday night.
|
The Royal Ballet's
Romeo and
Juliet
and Arrigo Boito's opera
Falstaff
will be shown onSaturday. Franco
Zeffirelli's
movie
Hamlet
will close out thefestival on Sunday.The event is
made
possible by a
grant
from the Academic Enrich-ment
Program.
This
programprovides annual grants
to
promoteaffairs of academic and culturalsignificance.The initial idea for
the filmfest
developed from the encouragingresponse that was shown whenboth
Much Ado
About Nothing
and
Henry V
played
at
the Films
^ty
members.For Discussion program that is
run
by Dr. George Garrelts, of
the
theology department Garrelts
and
others, including formerCollege President Sister EustaceTaylor, wanted to experiment withother forums for
bringing-
Shakespeare to the
Mercyhurst*
community.The money having beenprovided through the
grant,
acapable crew having beenestablished, all that
 remained
 wasobtaining the support of severalacademic departments. Garreltsdid
this by
incorporating
the
aid ofthe dance, English and music
departments.
"This
is
a
signifi-cant series
in that
it
ties
togetherthe various academic
depart-!,
ments, which is the ultimatefunction for
an
academicstatement of
this
kind," Garreltssaid.Garrelts hopes
that this
pilotfilmfest will
branch out
in thefuture, with various other Jthemes being explored. How-ever,
inancial
 backing isalways
an
issue
when the
costof
running a
festival of this sortcan
run
into over $2,500, ifmore recent
 films
 are involved.Possible themes include labor,Woody Allen, or
Linkletter
films such as
Before Sunrise
and
Slacker.
Passes to the festival
are
$1and free to Mercyhurst Commu-
[Are youintelligent?
Dr. Jonathan S.
Lockwood
By Leon Mumford
Merciad
Sports Editor
Dr. Jonathan S. Lockwood, a[former U.S.
Army
{Intelligenceofficer for
13
years,
will
give
a 45 •minute
lecture on
'The Future
of
Russia" Thursday,
Feb.
9 in
Zurn|!Hall,
 room
 114
at
8
p.m.
J
Lockwood is now an adjunctprofessor and independent re-searcher
at
the Joint MilitaryIn-telligence College in WashingtonD.C.
{
|,
Head of the History
department,
Allan
Bel
Jovarac,
presently work-ing towards a Strategic StudiesMasters degree
at
the IntelligenceCollege developed
a
rapport
with
Lockwood,
and
soon after invitedhim to speak
at
Mercyhurst
"Lockwood is a
specialist
in the
field of
Russo-American
rela-tions. He has written books,
a
r-ticles
and
commentaries
on
mili-tary strategy and intelligence in
general,''
said
Belovarac.
"This is an opportunity forMercyhurst students to quiz anexperienced expert on thein-trigues of foreign affairs," becontinued.
Lockwood's recently
published
book,
The Russian View of U.S.Strategy: Its Past, Its Future
has since
been nominated for the
Russel
Bowen
Award,
sponsoredby the National Intelligence Stud-
ies
Center,
for
the best
book pub-lished in the
 field
 of intelligencestudies during 1993.Matt Turner, head of the PhiAlpha Theta History Honors So-ciety said,
"This talk promises to
be particularlyrelevantconsider-
ing that the
U.S.
is
very concerned
about insuring the triumph
ofde-
mocracy.''
Perhaps
Lockwood's
most im-pressive achievement
is
reflected
in
the Analytical
Method for
Pre-diction he invented, which
is
nowbeing produced as a softwarepackage.
It
is currently being pre-
pared
for
commercial
sale
to
col-leges and universities across the"-"on.Belovarac urges students
to
at-
tend the
lecture.
"I think
it will bereally interesting to hear whatLockwood has to say about thecontemporary leaders in Russiaand the value he places on suchissues as
glasnost
and the estab-lishment of democracy," saidBelovarac.
E.C.C.O.
TIP OF THE WEEK
Capture
[the
World
The last film in
the
winterFilms For Discussion Serieswill be held this Tuesday Feb. 7
at Zurn
Auditorium
at
7 p.m.The film will be
Little Buddha,
the 1994 American movie
.
directed by BernardoBertolucci. It is
the
story of twoparents, played by Keanu
*Did you know that in
1988,
Americans used enough
kraft
paper for a person to take
a [brown
bag lunch toschool or work for 64 million years?
ALTERNATIVES:
Reeves
and
Bridget Fonda,whose son is thought to be areincarnation of
a
famousBhutan
lama.
The film will beintroduced by Keiko Miller ofthe language department withKen Schiff of the Englishdepartment leading
the
discus-sion following
the
film.
1.
Don't?
take a bag if your purchase is small.
2.
Bring your own mesh or cloth
-'bag
when you shop.3. Ask for bags made with recycled paper.4. Cut up brown bags & use them to wrap packages.REMEMBER: All brown bags can be
recycled jwith
corru-gated cardboard. White and colored paper bags can berecycled with mixed paper.
for more info:
"The
Paper Bag in Today's Environment.
11
AmericanPaper
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Madison Ave., New York, NY,
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D'Angelo Opera
Do you have a valentine? Do you want one?
The
Merciad
will run Valentine's Day
personal ads in the February 9 and16 issues.
Ads
will cost $2 for five lines (approximately
IS -
20 words).Each additional
line-will
cost
$.50.
If you're interested in running a
Valentine's Day
ad,
contact
Anne
at
the
Merciad
at extension
2376
or sendit to Box
161.
If
you
send your ad through the mail, please include yourname, phone number and mailing address
or else it will not
run.
Ads are
duethe
Monday
before date of publication. Ads in poor
taste
will not run.|
The D'Angelo
Opera
{Theaterwill present Pietro Mascagni's
Cavalleria
Rusticana
on Fridayand SaturdayFeb.3 &4
at
8
p.m.
in
the Mercyhuist
PrepAuditorium.
*
Conducted by D'AngeloSchool of
Music facultymember Frank
Collura,
theproduction will
be
with
a
fullorchestra. In
addition the
twoleading roles of
the opera
willbe sung by Louisa Jonason andStephen
Cola
ntti,
who
are
alsofaculty.
Lcs
Young, fromPittsburgh, will be
an
additionalguest artist The entireD'Angelo Concert
Choir
willalso
be
featured in the produc-tion.Baaed in
a
19th CenturySicilian village, the opera takesplace
on Easter
Sunday.
It is
a
Itragic story of
two men who
fallin love with the same woman.
Cavalleria Rusticana
f
ishistorically significant becauseMascagni used it
to
win anopera competition
in
whichLeoncavallo also submitted hisfamous work
PagliaccL
Todayit is traditional to perform bothworks on
the
same
evening.
Inkeeping
with
this tradition thePrologue
to
Pagliacci
will alsobe performed.
TTie operas
will be sung inItalian, with English
sur-titks
projected above
die
proscenium,
to
allow
full
audience compre-hension.Tickets are $5 and reserva-tions are strongly encouraged.Call
824-2364
for morc^
|
information.
£sM

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