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The Merciad, May 9, 1996

The Merciad, May 9, 1996

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The Merciad, May 9, 1996
The Merciad, May 9, 1996

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MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Farewell To Class
ing in
the
ceremonies, accordingto Bonnie Hall, registrar at thecollege. Hall said
"There
will be377 seniors participating in theceremonies
at
the Warner, which
By
Gagan
Suri
Merciad News Editor
Ceremony:
"The day is finally in sight"said a
graduating
senior. A recordnumber of 428 degrees will beawarded to 424 students at the68th annual commencement ofMercyhurst College on Sunday,
May
19,at ceremonies scheduledfor
2:30
p.m. at the Warner The-ater. Last year 387 degrees wereawarded. Four of this year's
graduates
will receive double
de-
grees in different majors.
This year also marks
the great-
est
number of students participat-represents
42
more
than
last year.
Graduates
are
to be
at
the
Aval
onj,Hotel in
the
ballroom
at 10*" andState Streets
to«line
up at 1:30p.m.Of
the
awards
to
be
presented,
the
breakdown
includes: one As-sociate of Arts degree, 56 Associ-ate of Science degrees;
285
Bach-
elor
of
Arts
Degrees, 56 Bachelorof Science degrees,
and
11
Bach-elor
of
Music degrees. In addi-tion, five master of science
awa
rdswill
be
presented in the Adminis-tration of Justice
and 14
master'sdegrees
in
special education willbe awarded.The ceremonies will be pre-
ceded
on
Sunday
morning
by
two
Baccalaureate
Masses to be cel-ebrated
at 9
a.m.
and at
11
a.m.
inChrist the King Chapel, followedby
a
brunch in the dining hall forthe graduates and their families.Both Masses will be celebratedby the Rev. Steve
Anderson,
col-lege chaplain.
p.m. The
dinner for the
graduates
is complimentary
and
each gradu-ate may invite
two
guests at $20each. Reservations need to-be
made
by
Friday,
May 10.
Dinnerreservation forms are to be re-turned by campus mail to Box500 or they can deliver
them
to
Sharon Sisco
in
Main
200A.
Ad-ditional
dinner reservation
forms
are
available
rom
 Sr.
Damien
atthe
switchboard.
Graduates wish-ing to invite additional
guests
willbe accommodated.Parent Dinner DanceOn Saturday night, the Gradu-
ation
Awards Dinner Dance willbe held in the Mercyhurst Ath-letic Center, with cocktails at 6:30
and
dinner
at approximately
7:15
Awards;At the awards dinner thePresident's Associates Achieve-
ment
Awards will be presented
to the
outstanding graduating
tra-ditional students in each of thenine divisions of the college: ar-
chaeology, business,-education,
hotel restaurant and institutionalmanagement, human develop-ment, humanities, natural sciences
and
mathematics,
performing artsand social sciences.These
awards
will be decidedon the basis of scholarship, ser-vice to the division,
potential
lead-ership to the profession. Thisaward is not based solely on anacademic index, although to beeligible, a student must have
a
Baverage in his or her major anddemonstrate a well-rounded de-velopment in the area that will
mark
him or her as
a
future
leaderinhisorher
chosen profession.New this year, full-time
fac-iultyfrom
within the nine divi-sions will also have the opportu-
j
nity
to
nominate
an
adult studentfor the Adult College Achieve-ment Awards
which will
be pre-
sented primarily for an excep-tionally high
QPA, but
other cir-cumstances that are singular toadult life may also be taken intoconsideration. Normally, due tothe relatively small number ofadult students in the graduationpool (15%),
and
to preserve theintegrity of this award, no morethan one or two adults will beselected annually from all divi-sions for achievement awards.Eligibility for the
President's
Associates
Achievement
Awardsand Adult College AchievementAwards is as follows: A tradi-tional student, for senior awardpurposes, is defined
as
one
who
isless than 25 years old, is a four-
year
degree
student,
and who
doesnot possess a second bachelor'sdegree. An adult student, for se-nior award purposes, is defined
as
one
who
began
his
or her
collegestudies at Mercyhurst at or after
the age
of
25 or who is
pursuing a
second degree
at the
college.
-
Both the
President's
Associ-ate Achievement
Awards
and
theAdult College AchievementAwards will be determined after
;
the winners have been selected
New Core Curriculum Proposed
By Gagan Suri
Merciad
News
Editor
The senate
at
Mercyhurst Col-lege has approved the new corecurriculum as a working
document.The
new core curricu-
lum
will
be
effective
for
the classof
2001.
The core curriculum
has
been
compiled
in
accordance
with
the faculty rationale of 1995and fulfills the goals defined in
the
rationale.According to the
rationale,
theCollege's Mission Statement de-fines Mercyhurst as "a commu-nity of
learning
dedicated to thelifelong development
of he
wholeperson." Further
it
states
that thecore curriculum embodies thecollege's belief
in
the humaniz-
ing
power
of
a
liberal
arts
educa-tion, and the core curriculum ismeant to complement thestudent's specific major by pro-viding
an
essential, coherent
and
comprehensive experience in gen-eral education.
tice,liuman,dignity,
respect'for
diversity, individual and
col
lee-tive responsibility.#3 To form thoughtful
and
spiri-tually sensitive persons ready tomeet the unpredictable and var-ied
cha Uenges
of
1
ife.
#4 To develop
the
following trans-Computer Literacy0/1 CourseGoals:#1 To enrich the quality of stu-dents' lives by cultivating theirintellectual creativity
and
curios-ity.
"•
f
#2 To
instill
awareness and ap-preciation for
the
values of truth,individual and intellectual integ-rity, compassion, mercy
and
jus-
Part-I
(No Charge)College Colloquy 2 ProgramsFreshman ProgramExperience Learning
Part-H
4 Credits2 Credits2 CreditsThe Common Core10 CoursesAmerican History
1
Arts AppreciationCollege Writing
I &
IIMathematicsNatural SciencePhilosophical InquiryReligious Person
and
TraditionWestern CivilizationLiterary
Classics- 1 Part-Ill
The Distribution Core 9 Courses
Behavioral/Social
SciencesEthicsHumanities
Mathematics/natural
ScienceReligious StudiesWorld
Cultures/World
Politics
4
30 credits3 Credits3 Credits
6 Credits3 Credits3 Credits3 Credits3 Credits3 Credits3 Credits27 Credits!6 Credits3 Credits3 Credits3
Credits
3 Credits6 CreditsCore Credit Totals!Course Totals:Colloquy:Competencies:Graduation Requirements:
63
Credits19 Courses
2Colloqu
0/1 Co
126 Credits
ferable skills of liberal learningwhich involves critical thinking,creative thinking and problemsolving strategies, effective writ-ing, effective oral communica-tion,quantitative analysis, moralreasoning, computer
literacy,
and
information literacy.#5 To develop understanding of
various
methods of
inquiry
in
dif-
ferent disciplines.
#6
To promote recognition of how
history,
social structures, andbroad conceptual frames of refer-ence have shaped the course of
human
thought
and
action.#7 To help students develop aninformed
and tolerant
understand*
ing
of cultures different
from their
own.
#8
To demonstrate to studentsthe humanizing role of the artsand
literature,
#9 To provide opportunities forthe exploration of
topics
in bothbreadth and depth.#10
To
help
students
understandthe inter relatedness of knowl-edge.Core Curriculum
I)
The College Colloquy
II)
The Common Core
III) The
Distribution
CoreCollege Colloquy 4Credits
The
College Colloquy
will
havefor the Carpe Diem Award, theBishop's Award for
Academic
Excellence,
the Sister CarolynHerrmann Service Award, theSister Eustace Taylor Leader-ship Award, and the MotherFrances Warde Adult StudentAwards. The latter three awardsalso will be presented at theAwards Dinner on Saturday nightThe Bishops' Award for Aca-demic Excellence will be pre-sented to the graduating seniorwho ranks first in the Class of
19%
and the top student awardgiven by the
college's
the
Carpe
Diem Award. Nominations for
all
senior
awards are
due
into
theOffice of the Vice President ofAcademic Affairs by noon onThursday, May 9, and the recipi-ents will be chosen by thePresident's
Station
Friday, May10 and notified by letter.Carpe Diem AwardThe
Carpe
Diem Award is thehighest student award presented
by
Mercyhurst College.
This
cov-
eted honor
is given
in
recognition
of intellectual competency, per-sonal integrity, and especially,leadership impact
It
will
be
pre-sented to the outstanding gradu-ating senior who has made themost positive impact on
the life
ofthe Mercyhurst community and
who
best exemplifies the collegeCont....2two parts, both of them wouldprovide 2 credits each requiredfor graduation , but they
will
beNo Charge credits. Part A. is
called
the
'Feshman
Program'
and
Part B, is called the
'Experience
Learning.' College Colloquy
in
general aims to establish colle-giate
conversation
between
lea
rn-
ers a nd tea
chers which would helpthe
full
development of respon-sible individuals.The Freshman Program is a
yearlong
program which includesadjustment at
the
i
college, aca-demic guidance, and personaldevelopment This
program'in-
volves group
meetings, assemblysessions and individual facultystudent guidance program.Experience
Learning
is
a
projectwhich bridges formal study andthe
co-curricular
activities spon-sored by
the
college for thestudent's educational benefit. TheExperience
Learning requirement
may be satisfied in one of
the
suggestedways:
an
approved in-terna
dona I
educational
travel,
an
approved study-abroad program,certified
attendance a 125
campus
events from
the
cultural
calendar,volunteer services or service
lea rning'courses
(150 hours atleast.)
5
The Common Core3
o
CreditsCont....2
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIADMay
9,1996
Above: Left
to
Right: Merdad
Staff:
Scott Vance,
Dan
Hie!
ilter,
 JerryTrambelly,
Gagan
Suri,
John
Murphy.
Communications Banquet Awards
By Gagan Suri
Merciad
News
Editor
The communications dinnerwas held on Thursday,
May
2ndat the downtown Holiday Inn.Awards were presented to stu-dents from the CommunicationsDepartment and the Merdad Of-
fice.
It was a tearful farewell forsome of
the students
working forWMCE,
radio
station at the col-lege.The service award fromWMCE was given to JayKennedy. Kim Sulzmann re-ceived the Broadcasting award.Bob Merski received the awardfor being the best nighttime an-nouncer, and Julie Gould receivedthe
best?
daytime announcer'saward. The best new announceraward was presented to MikeGratzmiller. The final award of
the?
best production was given
to Nikki Doba
y.The awardswere presented
by John Lieseri
ng.
Merciad awards were presentedby Jerry Trambley, faculty advi-sor to the paper. Dan Hilfiker,editor in chief received theMerciad service award. JohnMurphy received two awards: theBrian Sheridan award, and theBetsy
Lantz
award.
Cash
awards
were
also given away for journal-
ism
to Scott
Va
nee,
Nick
Krayger,John Murphy and James
Hain.
The dinner was attended bymore than 30 people. The officeholders for the next year wereannounced for both the Commu-nications Department and theMerciad Office.
Events on Campus
Photos
by Gagan Suri
Above; Left:
Tern at the Atheletic Center
Right: Academic Celebration, Site
Specific Dance
Below:
The velcro Fly
Trap.
Core Curriculum
cont.from pg.l
The Common Core providescourses
that are the
foundation tohigher learning, develop criticalthinking, help interpretation andexpression, as well
as artistic
sen-
sitivity, and philosophical andtheological reflection. The fol-lowing 3 Credit courses are in-cluded in the Common Core:American History, Arts Appre-ciation, College Writing I & II,Mathematics, Natural Science,Philosophical Inquiry, ReligiousPerson and Traditions, WesternCivilization,
and ^Literary
Clas-
sics.
College Writing I
&
II,
andMathematics
are
the courses that
are to
be taken in
the
first year atthe college.
r
*
The Distribution Core
27
Credits *
The
Distribution Core consistsof a flexible arrangement of
i
courses which further cultivatesintellectual curiosity and moralawareness while also extendingthe
student's
exposure to
a
widerrange of disciplines, methods,capacities, attitudes and values.
>:
Following are the details of the
^Distribution
Core:^Behavioral/ Social Sciences
6
Credits
/| 7
A student
can
choose two desig-nated courses from cultural an-thropology, economics, humandevelopment, political science,^psychology, or sociology.
Only^j
one course
can be
taken
 from
hesame department. At least one of
the
courses must be taken duringthe first year.
Ethics
1
3 Credits
i
This course
would-be
a senior
course and
taken
rom
 either
phi-losophy
or
theology.Humanities 6 CreditsA student
must choose two
desig-
nated
courses, one from each
de-
partment: Art,
Music
or theater
his-
tory, communications, foreign
lan-
guage (Intermediate level), litera-ture or philosophy.
Mat
hematics/Natural Science3 Credits |One designated course must bechosen
rom
 Mathematics, Anthro-pology/Archeology,^Biology,Chemistry, Geology, Physics, orScience
and
Technology.Religious Studies
3 Credits
'
Choose one of the designatedcourses.World Cultures/World Politics3
Credits
Student must chose two designatedcourses in world culture, world
his-
tory, world literature, foreign
lan-
guages
(In termed ia
te
level)/foreign
cultures,
global
5issues,
or globalpolitics.
One cou
rse
rom
he abovecategory must focus on culturaldiversity and/or have
a
non-domi-nant perspective.Graduation Cont from
pg
1motto,
"Carpe
Diem, to "Seizethe Opportunity."Sister Carolyn HerrmannAwardThe Sister Carolyn HerrmannAward will be presented to thegraduating
senior who
has givenunselfishly of time, energy, talent
and
loyalty
to
the college
and
hasdemonstrated a genuine concernfor social justice issues in theGreater
Erie
community in thespirit of the seventh president ofMercyhurst College,
Sr.
CarolynHerrmann. The recipient of thisaward will be
a
risk taker, a rolemodel to fellow classmates andevidence
a
personal commitment
to
the service of humanity.Sister Eustace Taylor Leader-ship Award
The.
Sister Eustace Taylor
Leadership
Award is given to a
graduating
senior
who has
exem-
plified superior leadership andinvolvement while a student atMercyhurst College. Named af-ter the fifth President ofMercyhurst College, this awardis presented at the discretion of
the President's Sta
ff. Exceptions 1student leadership and motiva-tion are the basis of
this
award.Mother Frances AwardThe. Mother
Prances
Adult
Stu-
dent Award
is the highest awardpresented by the college to anundergraduate adult student Itwill be presented to an
excep-
tional adult
student in
recognitionof superior academic work andpersonal and professionalachievement as an adult studentat Mercyhurst College. The re-cipient of
this
award will possessthe qualities of Frances Ward,American founder of
the
Sistersof Mercy,
who was
undaunted inher mission to
carry
out in thiscountry the work of CatherineMcAuely "to provide an educa-tion for
the
poor,
the
sick
and
the
undereduca
ted."
The recipient ofthis award shall be an individualwhose studies and years atMercyhurst
have been
character-ized
by ten
a city, perseverance andsacrifice and who has been anexample to traditional aged
stu-
dents that learning is a lifelongprocess.Two graduate studentawards will be presented at theawards banquet, the James V.
Kinnane
Graduate
Award
in theAdministration of Justice
and the
Special Education GraduateAward. Both graduate studentawards will be presented to theoutstanding
Master's
degree
can-
didates in two departments.Professor Award of the Year
Barry
McAndrew, Professor ofEnglish at Mercyhurst College,
has been nominated
to
receive
the
award
for best
teacher for the
95-
96 school year. He will be ad-dressing the graduates this year.
MSG News
By Dan
Hilfiker
Senior Writer
ecuti
ve board members over the
The
Freedom Zone
currently
hasf $3,068 left
in
their budget for thisschool year. The computer will
cost
$2,306.
Tberest
of the moneyThe Monday, May 6, meetingof Mercyhurst Student Govern-ment was marked by the induc-tion of
the 1996/1997
executiveboard members and class repre-sentatives. The short inductionceremony was followed by the
Gnal
meeting of MSG for this
academic
year.Nominations were taken forStudent Senate members. Everyyear, members of MSG are se-lected to sit on the Student
Sen-ate.
The executive board
mem*
bcrs
will
send a ballot with all
thecandidates listed to all mem-bers of MSG. The vote will be
tabulated
this Friday.
In
other
MSG
news,
there
was a
m
summer term. A motion
was
madeby Kevin Segedi to accept thatproposaI.
i
The
* vote was una n
i-
mous
in
favor
of the motion.All members of
MSG
receivedforms
in which they can sign up to
be a Senate committee member.Any student
is
eligible
to
sit
on a
senatecommittee.If anyone elseis interested in being
on a
Senatecommittee, they can
receive
4
a
copy of the form from MaryJeanne
Welser in
Preston 209.proposal made to approve anyemergency spending by the Ex-
Nominations
were also takenfor a Junior class female
who
would like
to
sit on the JudiciaryBoard,
"Any
student
who appeals
a sanction goes
before
theJudi-
ciary
Board,
which
is
made up
oftwo students, two faculty,
and two
administrators," Cass
Shimck,
advisor to MSG said.
The
Freedom Zone
is lookinginto buying a power Macintoshcomputer for their publication.they have in their budget will beused
to buy
new software for the
publication.The idea
was broughtup regarding what to do if thepublication went defunct Thisis
still a
student government com-
puter so even
if the
Freedom Zone
were to go defunct, it still wouldbe available for MSG,"
Shimek
said. A motion
was'made
byJenny Vetter to authorize thepurchase of
the
new equipmentThe motion passed unanimously.In Student Activities Commit-
tee
news,
Food
For Finals will beheld on Monday, May 13 in theLaker
Inn.
Quiet study will alsobegin in the cafe
on
Monday
and
Tuesday.
No
food
is allowed
into
the
cafe,
and students are
encour-aged to bring
their own
cups fordrinks.
 
May
9,1996
THE
MERCIAD
:«:«•
PAGE
3
By James
Hain
A
&E
Editor
Well,
this
is my last column forthe year.
Summer's a 1 most upon
us,
and,
if
you read my column
last
week, you know that the stu-dios
are
bombarding us with ev-ery type
of
flash and spectaclethey
ca
n hurl, designed, of course,to separate
you from
your money.
But video
does that just
as
well,and for less. And lest
you worry
about
all the
poor,
sta
rving studioexecutives
in
Hollywood, realizethat they pocket
all
the videomoney too. And they don't evenhave any perceptible talents!The summer, traditionally
a
slowtime for movie
rental
(who wantsto watch movies when thetern*perature is in the 90s, or, if youlive in Erie, the balmy 50s?),
is
nevertheless full
of
new videoreleases.
See
the films
you
didn'tsee the first time around. See allthe crap that you were sure you
didn
't want
to pa y
five
bucks
for.
It's now that
your little "I'll catchit on video" resolutions take
ef-
fect.'May 14th brings us
The
Ameri-
can
President
,
the lighthcarted,ultra liberal Rob Reiner comedyin which the President (MichaelDouglas)
falls
for
an
environmen-tal lobbyist (Annette Bening).Added
fun:
watch Richard
Drey
fuss'
ultra
tight conservativesenator in this film and comparehis performance
to
Gene
Hackman's
in
The
Birdcage.
Orbetter yet, compare them both to
Bob
Dole.
Also out on the 14th
isthe Robin Williams' special
ef-
fects
era p
icsUumanji,
where eventhe computer
graphics are old
hat.And for those
with a taste
for thestrange, there's
Powder,
about
a
bald-headed albino boy withmagic powers (hey, it's Disney,go figure).The rest
of
May brings you
Casino
(May
21st),j
MartinScorsese's blood-soaked Vegasfable that boasts
(if
that's
the
word)
Sha ron Stone's
first
Osca
r-
nommated
performance.
Casino
flopped
in
theatres,
mainly due to
it s three hour
running
time. Yourbutt will be less sore at home,where you don't have; to
sit
through
the
whole shebang
at
once. Also coming in May: Thenewest 007 movie,
Goldeneye
(May 21st) and the John
Travoltacomedy
Get
Shorty
(May 28th).June brings the long-awaitedcult classic
Heavy Metal
(June4th). One
of
the
most,popular
midnight movies ever, this 1981animated
sex-and-violence
epicmight possibly
be the
most polar-izing movie
of
all time.
You
either
love it
or
loathe
it.
I happen
to love it, but I'm pretty imma-ture, so caveat emptor. Also on
the
fourth,
you
may
want
to check
Tune
son
Tails
ra^Ltt
By Jason
Ulery
Merciad Columnist
It didn't
take
Bob Mould
very
long. Sugar
has only
beendisbanded for a few months
and
his
 first
 solo album in sixyears
has
been released. Thisis
in
the classic Bob Mouldmold, with loud guitars and adriven sound with Mould'swhine draped over it all. Thisis in contrast to the moodier,slower songs Mould displayson
the
self-titled solo LP.
f
The lyrics are also pretty
much the same
thing
you
find
on any Bob Mould
album. He
^ sings'about
relationships
in
In*
"Anymore
Thne'Between'^the current state
of
the so-
called
"alternative" scene on
"I
Hate Alternative Rock,"sour feelings in "Egoverride"
andJ"Hair
Stew," and beingalone and depression
in
thetrack "Deep Karma Canyon."This album seems
'to
try
to
replicate the sound of Sugar,but
it
doesn't seem
to
havequite the impact that
a
Sugaralbum would have.
I
haven'theard Mould's other solo
ef-
forts,
but all
of
his music now
seems
to
follow
a
general pat-
<J
tern
which
seems
to
be just
a 4>
step above today's "alterna-tive" bands as far as musicalstyle go.This
is
not
to say this is a bad
album, because it is still BobMould. This
album
just pales
in
comparison to Sugar's
Cop-per
Blue and
File Under: Easy
Listening*.
However, songssuch
u
asEgoverride,Thumbtack," "Hair Stew,
y
out Walter Matthau and Jack
Lemmon
riding the gravy trainonce
again in
Grumpier
Old
Men,
If
you
want
the
really good
stuff,
wait till the end of June, whenWoody
Allen's
Mighty
Aphrodite
(June^lSth)
and the electrifyingcrime thriller
Heat
(June 18th)
are
released.
For my
money,
Heat
still looks
like
the best movie of1995,even with five months
to
think
it
over. Check it out. June
will
also bring the release of thefinal two '95 Best Picture nomi-nees to hit video stores.
The Postman
and
Sense and
Sensibility
both step
gingerly into stores on June
25th.The
rest
of
the summer
releases
are
tentative,
but
expect
12
Mon-keys, Nixon,
Hr.
Holland's
Opus,Four Rooms, Rumble in the Bronx
and
Broken
Arrow
in July,
and the
latest QT extravaganza,
FromDusk
Till
Dawn,
in August.That's it for the year. Have
a
great summer,
and
I'll see
you
inthe fall."Deep Karma Canyon," and"Art Crisis"
are of h
igher qual-ity,
and
are close to
the
level of
something
you would find on
Copper
Blue
>*<i
t
For those of you into BobMould and Sugar, this wouldbe
a
must-add to your collec-tion. If
you
have not heardeither Mould solo or Sugar,they
have a
roaring,
buzzsa
w,dis-
torted sound that
is just
very loud
(this
would explain
Mould' s hear-ingloss).
I would
rate this a just-above average album
that
wouldonly be for true fans.Nicole Pons tingle
A&E Editor
>As
the year comes to
a
close, I
find mysel
f feeling rather itchy
toget out
of here. I
am not a
big fanof
Erie
and so
I
want
to
return toCleveland where there are actu-ally things todo.
The
whole ideaof entertainment
is so lim i ted
here.If you do not go
to a
collegefunction or
pass
out
on a
bar roomfloor, there just
isn't a
whole heckof
a
lot to do. It seems sad thatthese are the only real choices
that
we have.There
is
rarely ever a decentconceit
that
comes here. You getthe local-yokels
or
some random
band
from
a
neighboring city, butother than that, you are out
of
luck.
So,
if
you are hoping forHootie, dream on.
I
don't think
that Erie is an
open minded enough
town to
get decent
bands
though.
I went to
see "Live"
a t
the WarnerTheater
a
year ago
and
when theopening
band came
on, they werebooed and cussed at I felt like Iwas the only one clapping for|them. They were not even
a
badband, the lead singer
is
a veryseasoned singer from the Tsy-chedelic Furs,"
soUo
boo himseemed tasteless to me. Perhapsthese are the reasons that, Erienever
gets
any
real
entertainmentThey wouldn't know what to do
with
itAnyway, on to other things. 1
mean who
knows, maybe
we
willall come back next year
and
find
this
incredible
line-up
of concerts
and
theater, etc, but
I doubt
it, so|l do not suggest holding yourFbreath.I must say that I have enjoyedpolluting your minds with mybrand of humor and wit,
butfit
that my time has come
to
an end. So until never, ciao!
Music News
ERIE
YCUJIH
T
I
ONV
photo
by Gagan
Suri
By Nina Napoleone
Merciad Contributing Writer
The D'Angelo School of Mu-sic,in conjunction with the BrieYouth Symphony, presented the
Annual
Youth
Arts
Festival
in
theD'Angelo performing Arts Cen-
ter
Saturday,May 4, at 1:30 p.m.with Frank
Collura
as music di-rector.Frank Collura currently resides
as the
director of
ensembles at the
D'Angelo School of Music, buthas directed in many prominentorchestras such
as
the LondonPhilharmonic, the National Phil-harmonic Orchestra of Brussels,and as conductor and music di-rector
of
various symphoniesaround the country.Featured as directors in thisperformance were,
Almi
Clerkinfrom the Erie Playhouse Youththeater, along with Mary
Lynn
Peters from Meadville HighSchool,
a
nd
Jea n M arc Baicr
fromWJET-TV, FROGGY 94, andJET-102.
|
The D'Angelo School
of
the
DafinarkDanceTheatre.John
iEvans was the
Master of Ceremo-jnies.
K.
Callcn, famed for her
role
inABC-TV's
"Lois and
Clark*"
The
New Adventures of Superman,"was featured as Narrator for theErie Youth Symphony's rendi-tion of
"Casey
at the Bat." Shehas also performed as the
moth-*j
ers of
such
personalities as TomHanks
in
"Bosom
Buddies,"Geena Davis
in
"Sara,"
and
Michelle
Pfeiffer
in
"Frankie andJohnny."
*The Erie Youth
Symphony pro-gram consisted of
such
works asthe overture^ to the
"Barber
of
Seville" to
"The
Sound of Mu-sic."They are also members of[the
American
Symphony Orches-tra League.This program was made pos-sible by. The Erie CommunityFoundation,
the
D'AngeloSchool, The E.Y.S. Patrons andBenefactors, JET Broadcasting,Music's
Great
Performers Seriespresented Janos Starker, worldrenowned cellist,
at
the MaryD'Angelo Performing
Arts
stageMay
5
at 2:30 p.m.Starker is recognized through-
out
the world
as one of
the
world's
supreme musicians
of
the 20thcentury and is widely acknowl-edged to be one of the greatestvirtuoso cellists of all time.He began to study cello in hisnative Budapest
at the
age of six
and was teaching his
first
studentat age
11.
He resumed his
studiesat Budapest's Franz Liszt Acad-emy of
Music
before emigrating
to the
U.S.
in
1948,
and
since then
has
performed
at
many places in-cluding the Metropolitan Opera,the Dallas Symphony, and theChicago Symphony.
PJaying
the piano was
SbigeoNerik
t,
who has been
touring withStarker since 1976. They havecompleted tours throughout Eu-rope, Asia, Japan, Taiwan, andmany other countries.
k**%
**».**%*%*%*%%•»%%
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