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The Merciad, Oct. 30, 1996

The Merciad, Oct. 30, 1996

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The Merciad, Oct. 30, 1996
The Merciad, Oct. 30, 1996

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VOL. 70 NO. 7ERIEOctober
30,1996
Criminal Justice Club Haunts Parking Garage
By Todd Zielinski
Merc
ad News Writer
Last weekend the Mercy hurst
Criminal
Justice Club went bead
to bead
in
competition with Erie'sfinest haunted houses by kickingoff one of itsown.The hauntedhouse was open from 7 p.m. tomidnight on Friday and 7 to 10p.m. on
Saturday
and Sunday.For the last three years, theCriminal Justice Club has run ahaunted house in the parking ga-rage. The funds collected fromthe haunted
house
go
to
pay
for a
week long stay at the NationalCriminal Justice Convention in
Nashville
Kentucky.Club President
Katie Saban
hasalways
been
optimistic about thisfond raiser,
but
this
year she
saidshe
was
even more
confident thanever. "It was the best hauntedhouse we Ve ever had," she said.
The
club designed
a
total make-over of the haunted
house
makingit six rooms and a maze. Oneroom included
a
bridge extendedover
"troll
valley," another roomwas surrounded by minors andmind-boggling design patterns,
and yetanotherwas
fully equippedwith
a
crazed
cha
insaw killer.Each night, the popular radiostation Rocket 101 was on hand
to
give away prizes
to
every 10thcustomer and provide loud 80srock tunes throughout the garage.Participants who experiencedthe haunted house had the samepositive response, Tony Furs, asophomore
R/IAP
major said,
"TTiat
was
the 'best
dollar I'vespent since
18th
and Sassafras."Markus Lacis, a sophomore ma-joring^
in
management?was
so
thrilled
by it,
that
he
said
he wentthrough the
haunted house
a
totalof
five
times,
three
times byhim-
self.
Due to
the efforts of
the
Crimi-nal Justice Club, they
made
a profit
of $350 a
fter overheadcosts.They
W
were also able to entertain morethan 250 people in
a
time span ofless than
12
hours*The people who went throughthe haunted house ranged from
the
ages of four
to
people in their
40 'sand 50
's.
Club Secretary LisaRoberts said,
"The
haunted housewas bigger
and
scarier
than
ever,I'd like to thank the people whohelped out thisyear.". These people included ChrisWaddington, Heather Barron,Bonnie Broad, Larry Smith, T.J.Guzy,
Greg
Bruno, Nicole Wilder,Diane Szklenski, Kelli Davis,Mark Erie,
Eric
Carlson, JohnBarry, David Mares,
Aa ron
Lauth,Rebekah Batcharie, EmmaPastrick and Tara Puhlman.Members of the
Criminal
Justice Club
(left to
right) Front row:Diane Szklenski, Kelli Davis,
Carin
Majocha, Larry Smith; 2ndrow: Nicole Wilder, Heather Barr*on, Shaun Gayer, John Barry}
3rd
row:
Rebekah Batcherie,
Lisa
Roberts, Secretary, andKatrinaSaban, President;
Back
Row: Greg Bruno, Chris Fultz,
T
J. Guzy,Chris Waddington,
and
Dave Mores. Photo Credit: Jessica Russell.
Class of
'97
to Fund New Park
By Chris Wloch,
Merciad
News Editor
%
Traditionally,
the graduating
class has
left
its
mark
at
the Hurst?
Thishas usually been some kind of gift to the college community that isbought with money raised by the senior class.In the past, seniors have contributed by raising funds to build thegazebo behind the Hermann Union, purchase the grand piano in theUnion's Great Room, install stained glass windows
in
both SullivanHall and the Student Government Chambers, and provide variousendowment
scholarships
for
Mercy
hurst students in
inancial
 need.This
yea
r,
the
Cla ss o
f
*97
is
hoping
to lea
ve
behind
a
new pa
rk whichwill be located to the west of the recently completed D'AngeloPerforming
Arts
Center. The
park
will
be
the
 first
hing
you see
whencoming out of
Baldwin
Hall's east entrance.Although the
na
me
of the
park is
undecided, and
the pla
ns
are
still on the
drawing
board,
the
new park
will be named in
memory
of this year's senior class. At this point in time, it is possible that thepark
will
include a reflecting pool, said Vanessa Pappalardo, who isone of
the
people on the Senior Project Committee.Every senior should receive
a
letter introducing the Senior Project
Ca mpaignon
Monday,
Nov. 4.
All proceeds
from
the
campa
ign
whichwill commence with a pledge drive during the winter term, will gotoward the expenses involved with the new park.The
goal
is to achieve
100%
participation of the 1997 graduatingclass
in
order
to
raise $3,500
to
cover
the
estimated construction costsof
the
park. Seniors
are
encouraged to
refer
al
questions, suggestions
and
comments
to
Vanessa Pappalardo at
ext
2993,mailbox
#P 1500
by
Friday, November 8 in order for plans on the
fund-raising
project tomove forward.
Clinton WinsMock Election
By Christie Stratthaus
Contributing
Writer
This past Monday and Tues-day,
the
Mercy
hurst Political
Sci-ence Association (PSA) held amock Presidential Election
in
theUnion. In all, a total of 64 stu-
dents cast
votes.
Out
of that num-ber, incumbent candidate, BillClinton, had an easy victory.Clinton received 37 votes, or
58%
of the overall vote.
Republ
i-n candidate, Bob Dole, laggedbehind with 19 votes, or 30%overall. Third Party candidateRoss Perot collected
8%, and
the
remaining
4%
went to others.Along gender lines
58%
of thevoters were female, and 34% ofthese women voted for Clinton.
17
% voted
for
Dole,
and
11%
forPerot and others. Males consti-tuted
42%
of
the
voters and 55%of these men voted for Clinton,
30% for
Dole,
and 15%
for Perotand others.The results of the PSA mock
election
are
fairly
consistent withthe national polls, with Clintonhaving
a
sizeable lead over Dole.
Career Fair Comes to Hurst
By John Murphy
Editor in
chief
On Thursday, Nov. 7,Mercy
hurst will
host the
 fifth
 an-nual Erie College Career Coop-erative (ECCC) career day/em-ployment information fa
ir.«
The fair, which begins at 11a.m. in the Athletic Center, willbring more than 100
com pa
nyrepresentatives on campus. Stu-
dents
fromGannon,Edinboro,Al-Icgcny,
and
Penn State-Behrend
have been invited to attend.According to Frank Rizzonc,Assistant Director of Career Ser-vices, the fair is designed
to
givestudents an opportunity to trans-late
their area
of study into some-thing that
can
be used in the
real
world. "Most
career
fairs arestrictly orientated toward recruit-ing and, while this is a goal ofours,
we
also
intend
it
to be a
fairwhere companies will
cive
stu-
dents
information
about
careers,"said Rizzone.
L
u
We
want
to
open
students' eyesto the wide
variety
of opportuni-ties
that
are out there related totheir major," he said. There
will
be
literature
and
application
pro-
cedures available from each
com-pany.
^
All majors
are
catered
to by
thevariety
of
companies represented,from
Accoun ting to CriminaI
Jus-
*
tice
to
Physical Therapy. Amongi some of the 'big name'
com
pa-! nies attending are MetLife,Mellon Bank, Prudential,Rambaldo Communications, Ra-dio Shack/Tandy Corporation,General Nutrition, Inc.,
Marriott
Corporation
and
U.S. Border Pa-<u*ol.The fair is open to students ofevery class.
The
Office of Career. Services would like
to
remind
I
seniors to bring their
resumes
and
I
to dress professionally.
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIADOctober
30,1996
^
W
Wamllm
Campus Ministry Collects
a Ton of
Food
By Chris
Wloch
News
Editor
More than
2,000
pounds
of non-
perishable
food items were do-nated by members of the collegecommunity during October,which is Hunger AwarenessMonth. Two weeks ago,
more
than80 students went door-to-door inthe Erie
area
collecting food thatwas
given
to
the Emergency Pan-try of the Second Harvest Food
Bank.
] f
Michele Garvey, Campus Min-ister, said that 1,658 pounds offood was collected as
a
result ofthe drive which took place onMonday and Tuesday, October14 and
15.
"This year
we were honored atthe Second Harvest Food PantryAnnual Bread Box Award Cer-emony. Each year, Campus Min-istry receives an honorable men-tion for
our
efforts.
In
addition tothis honor, we received a BreadBoard Award this year," Garveysaid.
*'
As a result, Garvey expressedher
appreciation
to the
Mercy hurstcommunity for participating, "Iwant to thank all the students,clubs, sports teams and coacheswho
were
so
helpful
with
the
suc-cess of the door-to-door fooddrive. Take much
pride
in youraccomplishment Tonight whenyou eat a meal, think for amo-
ment
about where the food youdonated or collected is.
I'm
suresomeone who might have gonehungry is very grateful for yourefforts," she said.The amount of food that has
been donated
by
students,
faculty
and administrators and
left
in thedrop-olTboxcs,
which
are locatedall around campus, has yet to betallied. Garvey
said that
the
boxes
will
not be brought to CampusMinistry until Monday, Novem-ber 4 in order to give people anopportunity to drop off non-per-ishable food items
that/will begiven
to
the Second Harvest Food
Bank
in
the
Erie community.
New
f!
No
Parking"
Signs Installed
By Chris Wloch
News
Editor
Last week, several new "NoParking
At
Any Time,
Tow
AwayZone" signs were installed
on
the
roadway near the exit
to
the
upper
level of the
parking*ramp
andbehind the Warde Townhouses.According
to
a
statement recentlyissued by the Security Office,these areas will be routinely pa-trolled by officers to make sure
that
the order
is
strictly
enforced.Security Director Ken Sidunsaid that there were two reasonswhy the signs are being put
up.
The signs behind the parking
ramp
are
there
in
order
to aid
theplowing of snow
tha t
will have totake place during
the
winter.
Sidunsaid that
the
area
tends to
become
icy once the snow starts
to'
fall.The Security Office is hoping thataccidents resulting from slipperyconditions
will
be prevented if no
cars
are
parked
there.Sidun also said
that .by
nextweek, several
"Do
Not Enter: OneWay" signs will be posted in thisarea to
warn
drivers not to exit theramp the wrong way (that is, tothe right towards Weber Hall).With regards to the "No Park-ing*
9
signs which were installedbehind the Warde Townhouses,
Sid u n said that they are
necessaryto
provide
the
garbage trucks withaccess to the
dumpsters
locatedthere. If the dumpsters areblocked, they
do not
get emptied,and the garbage collection ser-vice will charge
an
extra $25-50fee to empty the dumpsters thenext time they come around.Chandra Inglis,
a
senior archae-ology/anthropology major wholives in Warde, said that she ap-proves of
the
new
"No
Parking"signs "because cars
parked
in
thatarea have made travelling
throughthere very dangerous."According to Sidun, the newsigns will definitely be enforcedstarting next week,
and some cars
may even get towed as early asFriday if they are left in the "NoParking Zone."Junior Emilio Colaiacovo (left) and Fresher
Maris
a Ortman loadboxes with food in Campus Ministry* Photo credit: Scott Vance.
ATRs
TVack
Midterm Student Progress
By Bill Melville,
Merciad News
Writer
For
the last
13
years, the Academic Support Services
Program
has
helped
Mcrcyhurst
students, especially
reshmen,
o
be informed of
their
grades.According
to
Elaine
Ruggiero
and
Betty Damper,
two
counselors with
thisprogram,
the
midterm
tracking of students
grew from
an
initial
125 studentsto nearly 1,300 students being
monitored
by different
administrative
offices. Although this office
tracks
freshmen most closely as a group,
it
alsokeeps
track
of some sophomores
and
upper classmen.
Each
term, Academic Tracking
Reports (ATRs)
are
sent
to the
professors
with
tracked students. The professors, in turn,
give
a
letter grade
at
that pointin the course
and
provide any additional comments. They then return themto the Academic Support Office. Over 80 percent of faculty memberssupport
the
program
in this way. According to Damper, "The success of thereports is due to the faculty response by returning the
 forms
 as soon as an
academic
concern is indicated on
a
student"ATRs serve the students by giving them
a
tangible piece of
paper
whichshows
them how
well
they
are
doing
in a
class
at
mid-term
time. A counselor
then
reviews
the
form with
the
students to discuss how they
can
improveor decide whether or not to withdraw from
a
class.
IDuring
the
94-95
school year,
a
formal
move
was
made
to
reorganize
theprogram, with the formation of
The
Progress Posse." Its purpose was tocentralize
and
prevent
the
duplication of forms
for
students. Some studentshave forms sent to both the Academic Support
Services
office
and to
otheroffices, such as those of the McAuley Division and sports teams. In thefuture, Damper hopes
to
make
reporting more efficient,
which
may
be
donewith the addition of Datatel,
a
new computer system.
 
iAttittttt
KSSas
mffitimikM
MSG
NEWS:
Skates Moved toIce Center, 24-Hour Study Areato be
Set
?
Up
in
Library';
By Melissa Lang,
MSG Secretary
At
8:30 p.m., on Monday, October
28,
MSG
held its weekly
meeting in the
Student Government Chambers,
upstairs in
theUnion.The main topic
of Monday *s
meeting
was the
sign board. Atlast
week's
meeting, Treasurer
Trisha
Greathouse asked thereps to ask students what they
thought,
about the new signboard
in the
Laker Inn. After
a long
discussion,
a motion wasmade a nd voting
took place.
The sign boa rd will
officially
be
a part of the Laker Inn, at least until next year.
SAC
chairperson Brian Marshall reminded all reps of
this
week's
activities and
recapped last
week's
activities. Marshall
also
stressed
the importance
of getting involved
and
showingup for events. There will
be an
M-4
simulator in
the
union onFriday from
1-7
p.m.Vice President, Tom Bender thanked everyone who at-tended the lecture series on Thursday. Due to the lack of
attendance
from
the MSG
reps,
the
lecture
series will now bea
mandatory
activity
for them.
The
next lecture
will
take placeat 8 p.m. on November 6 in the
D'Angelo
Performing ArtsCenter.
Twenty-something
college student Katie Koestnerwill
be speaking on "Date
Rape."President
Stacey Fitzpa
trick recently
met with
Mr.
Tho-
mas Billingsley to discuss problems brought up by MSG
reps.
Thanks
to
Fitzpatrick and the
entire Mercy hurst Stu-
dent
Government,
there
will
now be
a 24-hour
study place
located
in
the Montgomery
Room
of
the
library.Security iscurrently working on installing a camera in the room andgetting it ready for use. The room should be open forstudents
by
the beginning of
the
winter term.
The
Freedom Zone
has
another
issue
out this
week."Ifs
just
a
gift,"
said
editor
Kevin
Segedi. Look for
issues in theUnion and around
campus.
The
FZ
committee
is
presentlyworking
on changes
in layout
and
organization. Segedi
and
his committee
are
presently looking for ideas and submis-sions for
the
next issue.
As well as a
24-hour study place, students have
also
saidthey would
like to get the
computer
lab hours
extended,now,
it is not a
possibility but
a
few computers
are
goingto
be
moved to
the
24 hour study place for student use.Last but not least, the ice skates will
be
moved from the
union
to the
Ice
Center
this
week.
Students
waiting
to
useskates for
the open
skating session can
now
get them in theice center instead of the
game
room
in the
union..
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Applications
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