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The Merciad, April 24, 1997

The Merciad, April 24, 1997

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The Merciad, April 24, 1997
The Merciad, April 24, 1997

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20
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE^GLENWOOD
HILLS, ERIE, PA.
16546 Aprils
Lecture to kick off Academic Celebration
By
Chris Wloch
News Editor
This Sunday
marks
the begin-ning of the Second Annual Mer-cyhurst College Academic Cel-ebration which lasts
 from
 April
28 to Ma
y
1.
The week-long event30 different presenta-tions and artistic performances,most of which are being spon-
sored
and
presented by membersof
the
Mercy hurst community.This year the inaugural event
will be
the Second Annual MauraSmith Lecture on
Sunday)
April
27,
at 6 p.m. in the PerformingArts Center. The guest lecturerthis year is Sister Helen Marie
Burns,
RSM
speaking on
"Lib-
era
tion a
nd the Works
of
Mercy."
Currently
a
doctoral
student
inthe School of Religion at theUniversity of Iowa, Burns hasspent
17 yea rs
in leadership posi-tions
such
as
regional counselorand provincial administrator in
the
Sisters of Mercy.
She
served
as vice president of
he
Sisters ofMercy of
the
Union from 1984until
1991
when
the Union joinedwith other
congrega
tions
to
form
M
the
Institute.of theiSisters
ofMercy of
the
Americas.In
1988,
Burns was elected to
a
three-year term as president ofthe Leadership Conference ofWomen Religious. Currently, she
is
a
member of the
Mercy HealthServices,';New
Ways
MinistryBoard
and Unity
Health
System.According to
Assistant
Aca-demic Dean
Sr
Patricia
Whalen,Burns has lectured extensivelyon religious life, leadership andtraditions
of
he Sisters
of
Mercy.Sister Helen Marie is
a
verydynamic speaker
with
a great deal
of
 experience
at
the national level.
I've
heard her speak before
and
I
appreciate the depth of visionshe offers. Given
the
suffering of
the
world today, I think it's
im-
portant to deepen our understand-ing of how
to
live our lives fromthe perspective of liberation
and
mercy," she
said.
Vice President of AcademicAffairs, Dr. Joseph Gower saidthat
Bums'
lecture will be a
re-
consideration of the works ofmercy
 from
he point of view ofliberation theology.This will be an energetic, in-formed lecture which will help
the
college
community better
ap-
preciate
our Mercy heritage. It'sgood
to
have
a
presentation deal-ing with
the
founding inspirationbehind Mercyhurst scheduled aa
the
launching event for AcademicCelebration,''
he
said.Senior Michelle Mizia,
who baa
served as the organizer of Aca-demic Celebration for the past
two
years,
expressed her satisfac-
tion
with the overall
quality of
helineup
this
year
as
well
as the h
ighlevel of involvement
 from
 mem-bers of the college community.It is
especially
exciting becausea lot of the events
are
being
pro-
duced by., so many of our ownstudents and faculty. There are
more students
involved
than
lastyear, and this reflects the wholepurpose ofAcademic Celebration,
which is
to provide
an
open venuefor them to express their artistic
and
intellectual abilities."
"But
we need participants tohelp
keep
Academic Celebrationalive
so
I strongly encourage ev-erybody to attend at least one ofthe
events,"
she
said.
-
u
In
order
to
make
it
easier to
get
to see aa
many different presenta-
tions
aa
possible Mizia
said mat a
special effort
was
made to avoidscheduling
too
many events
at
thesame time.
"We tried not
to over-lap as much aa last year. That'swhy the majority of events arespaced out over a period of four
days,
in hopes
that
every body willbe
able
to attend something."At the beginning of this year,Mizia
started
the
preparations
forAcademic Celebration. For sev-
eral
months, she collected
propo-sals,
selected and coordinated theevents, decided times and rooms,and designed the bulletin. Mizia
also kept
a
dose
connection
withBames
and
Noble bookstore and
s
in promoting theAcademic Celebration tomem-bers of
the
Erie community*Dr. Bud Brown, director of the
Mercyhurst
Honors Program saidthat this is the second year thathonors students have sponsoredAcademic Celebration. Two yearsago it was reestablished after ahiatus of several
vears.
Inside This
Week
Pg3-Hain
aims at
PointeBlank? M
Pg2-More
Items Stolen
On
Campus
Pg9-Rites
of
Initiation
On
Campus
Pg6-
Letters
Defend
New
MSO President
g
Pg
12
-
FootballSeniors Will
BeMissedBrown said
that
he is
optimistic
mat the
student who is named asthe organizer of next
year's
Aca-demic Celebration will work aahard aa Mizia has to ensure that
the
event
remains
a success.
"Hopefully
we will get some-
ly
with as much energy and
dedication
as
Michelle has given
over the past
two
years,"
he
said.
•:tn
Library improvements
proceed
at;
a
measured pace
By Chris Wloch
News Editor
•:•:•
Work crew*
Insull the Hemmermill
Libieiy* new
geolhermil Heeling end
cooling system
.V.
AVAVeVeVtVtVe
For several
weeks
now, teamsof Hammermill Libraiy employ-ees
and
students
have
been work-ing
in
between
the
shelves,plac-ing bar codes on the more than
100,000
books in the collection.At this point, about half of the
&
have had
bar
codes
placedon them in anticipation of thecomputer
database
which will
ar-
rive sometime in June.According to Dean of Librar-
ies,
Dr. Roy Strausbaugh,
*thc
automation project is comingalong
at
a
measured
pace. A lion's
share
of
the
books will be readyby the
end
of this year,
19
he
said.Strausbaugh said
that work
onthe building addition to the li-
brary
is
also
"right
on
schedule."
As of
his
week,
the concrete
foun-
dations have been laid and the
shaft for the new hydraul ie el
eva-tor has been built
In
the outsidearea where
the
grotto used
to
be.
»i:
%
In the next couple of
weeks,
theconstruction workers will beginputting the
steel beams
into place
to
orm
he
new
framework
of
hebuilding.Additionally, a new,
state-of-
the-art
geothermal
heating andding
system
is presently beinginstalled in the area across
the
driveway
on
the
north side
of thelibrary, Strausbaugh
said.
As soon aa students leave forthesummer,work
crews
will be-gin
the
more
heavy constructionwork which involves knockingdown walls and ripping out the
ol
d
ductwork for
the current heat-ing and cooling system..:
Even
though
most
of
the
major
improvements should be com-
pleted
by
the
time students return
to
classes
in the
tall, Strausbaugh
said that
any
remaining workwill not interfere with business
as
usual in
the
library.
"Even
if
the
paint's
not
dry
on
the
walls
next
Call
we must
open
the doors for students to study'.'
ft ft *
 
PAGE
2THE
MERCIAD
April
24,1997
*•
m
McAuleyresidents charged for roof damages
By Todd
Zielinski
Merciad Writer
On
February
21,
a maintenancerequest
was turned in by theMcAuley staff regardingprob-lems with water
on
the
floor
of
the
ma
in
lounge caused by numerousleaks
in
the ceiling. After mainte-nance
.responded,
all McAuley
residents
received
a
letter
notify-ing-
them
of a fine
t
of $20 perperson and
the
J reason* for the
charge—to
cover
die
cost of re-pairing the
roof.*
1
According
to
Director of Resi-dence Life Tyrone Moore, con-
tractors were
immediately called
to work on the
roof n conjunctionwith maintenance personnel.Moore said that there were nu-merous beer bottles which hadbeen
thrown
on top of the
roof.
The
impact
from
the bottles break-ing against the roof had caused
the
leaks;
he
sa
id.
m
>
Moore
said
that since the roofwas fairly new,
he
checked
to
seeif the warranty would cover therepairs,
so tha t
the residents would
not have to
be
charged. However,the warranty did not cover thecost of
the
damage.
The
matter
was
then turned over
to Bifl
Kerbusch, director of
facili-
ties, who
started
an
investigation
I
to
find
out who
ha
d
been respon-sible.
When no one came
forwardwith any information,
it
was
de-cided that all McAuley residentswould
have
to share
the
expensesof
repairing
the
roof.
This decision was based uponthe Student Handbook whichstates
on page 17
that "Damage tocommon areas (lounges, stair-wells,
etc)
is assessed
to
the larg-est, most likely group possible
when it cannot
be determined whocaused the damage.... Minimumcharge for damage is
$5."
*
Moore said that in most situa-
tions this
policy
has
not been en-forced,
but
in this
case
the
lack ofevidence
provided
no
other solu-tion
to
the
problem
than
to
charge
all the residents for
the
damage.
"I
strongly believe
that
the vastmajority of residents in McAuleyHall are good citizens who arevery respectful of
the
laws andpolicies that govern housing in
general,"
he said.Several McAuley residents ex-pressed their dissatisfaction overbeing charged such a high pricefor
the
cost of repairs.
"It's
funnyhow
every time they need
moneyfor something new we get
a
fine.
I wish I knew
why
the roof was
soweak
that breaking
a bottle on itwould cause
that much
damage,"said freshman Andrew
Zloty.
"I
think we
are
getting charged
for something
that
isn't
our
fault,"
said reshman
 Curtis
Walsh.
"We
Security
seeks information
on
stolen
i
are
not
even
allowed
to
have
beerbottles in the dorms anyway sohow could
it be us.
It's
a bad
wayto solve the problem."By Alissa Minner
Contributing
Writer
During
the
past week,
die " Yield
to
Pedestrians"
signs
in
the
park-ing lots
outside
the little Theaterwere stolen.
Head
of Security Ken
Sidun said that
he
would
appreci-ate it if the signs were returned
because
the
area
is hazardous forstudents
and
faculty
when
cross-ing
the
road.More than a month ago, twoother items were stolen whichhave yet to be returned. Theseinclude
a
$75
banner bearing
thecollege emblem which
was
taken
from
Sullivan Hall
and
a
bust of
Michelangelo's
David stolen fromthe foyer outside Christ the
King
Chapel.Sidun said
that the bust has
beena
part
of
he
college for
about
17-18 years.
It was a
gift
to
CollegePresident Dr. William P.
Carvey
from Marv Daly, Vice Presidentof External Affairs.
It
has
a
lot
ofsentimental value and should bereturned, he
sa
id.
According to Sidun, no
disci-
plinary
action will
be
taken
if the
persons
who
stole these items
re-turn them to their rightful place.
However,
if they
are
not returnedand the persons responsible are
caught,
then theft charges
will
be
filed, he said.
^ ^4
To help prevent further thefts,the security office is thinkingabout installing cameras in thehalls of Old Main and in the
D'Angel
o
SchooJ
of Music build-ing to serve as a safety measurefor
students
and faculty.
Sidun
encouraged
anyone with
information about these stolenitems to call him at
ext
2104
of
leave an anonymous tip under
bis
door, 209
Old
Main."Any infor-
mation
would
be
greatly
appreci-
ated," he said
,
K
MSG News: Elections
on
'Thursday .andFriday
Freshman
Jen
Rosa
(right) poses
with
two
prospective Mcrcyhurst students during
the
Laker Live
In17th Annua
I
Laker Live Inn A Success; On April
10 and
11,
Mercyhurst hosted
105
prospectivefreshmen.
They
were entertained on Thursday
evening,
stayed overnight with current freshmen
and
attendedclasses
alt day
Friday. 64 of those who
attended ha
ve
•committed to
attend-in-
the -fa Ut4pBy
Melissa Lang
MSG Secretary
On Monday, February 17
the
Mercyhurst Student Governmentheld its weekly meeting in theUnion.A motion was made to cancelnext week's meeting due to thefact that the
representatives
willbe having an Appreciation Din-ner that
evening.The motion
was
passed*SAC Chairperson BrianMarshal] announced that lettersof
intent
for SAC
chair
positions
will be due in the SAC office by 5
p.m. on
Friday,
April25.Vice President Tom
Bender
re-
minded everyone present that
elections
for class
renrpcAn ta
ti\i»e
will take
place this Thursday
and
Friday, April 24 and 25. All stu-dents are encouraged to
partici-
pate.Treasurer Trisha
Greathouse
»*
submitted
the.proposed
budgetfor the 1997-98 school year. Af-
ter a
few suggested changes, thebudget passed.During
the
meeting
a
proposalwas passed around for reviewconcerning free yearbooks forseniors. All underclassmen willbe charged a
fee
for yearbooks,although this fee
can
be
taken off
the student's
bill
if
they
wish. Theproposal was approved by thereps, and President Stacey
Fitzpatrick
will submit it
to
Mr.William Kennedy, dean of stu-dent services sometime this week.
 
April 24,1997THEMERCIADPAGE
3
Cusack shoots from the hip in "Grosse Pointe Blank"
By
James Hain
Merciad A&E
Editor
I don't know if anyone looksforward to his or her
Ugh
schoolreunion. Well, aside from BillGates, who can use the occasionto rub his success in the faces ofall
the
people who called
him
"thefour-eyed
dweeb with the com-puters." But most people don'thave that luxury. Everyone whowent to high school will eventu-ally get one of those letters invit-ing them to reopen old wounds
and make fun of the football
playerwhose girth has expanded as hishairline has receeded.
Evcryoncle
ven hitmen.
That's
the kicker in
Grosse
Pointe
Blank,
the clever new com-
edy
from director GeorgeArmitage
(Miami Blues).
JohnCusack (who also co-wrote andco-produced) stars as Martin
Blank,
a meticulous contract killerwhose latest job happens to coin-cide with his
10-year
reunion.Initially, Martin is reluctant
to
go,
but his secretary (played byCusack's
{
sister, Joan) and hisshrink
(Al an Arkin)
convince himit will get him out of his currentfunk and in touch with his roots.So Martin decides to drop byhis title hometown, an affluentDetroit suburb, where all his oldclassmates have gathered,
including
Debi (Minnie Driver), the girl-friend he ditched
at
the prom.She's now
a
local deejay and de-
lights
in tormenting Martin
on
theair. Worse yet, his colleagues andenemies are on his trail, andGrosse Pointe is crawling withshady characters who want toensure that Martin isn't aroundfor the 20-year reunion, includ-ing a pair of crooked feds, a trainedassassin, and Martin's arch-rivalGrocer (Dan Aykroyd), who ismiffed that Martin refuses
to
joina professional killer's union thathe's organizing.The hitman stuff is pushed tothe background as
die
relation-ship between Martin
and
5
Debi
takes center stage. Driver is ef-fective in the role, as she gentlytortures Martin, inclined to givehim another chance,
yet
not will-ing to let him off the hook soeasily.
But
Grosse Pointe Blank
is really a vehicle for JohnCusack's considerable comic
o
 1-ents (too often squandered
in
bad80s teen comedies). Though atfirst it's difficult to accept him asa professional killer, he grows
into the role as the Glm
goes along,and his transformation from me-thodical hitman to bumblinggood-guy is fun to watch.In fed, all of
Grosse
Point
 Blank
is
fun to
watch. It feels likea Jonathan
Demme
movie, even
Local movie premieres at the Warner
It
couldn't have
imii• HI
better
IIIK
1
u In thcmidstofTigerWi
mania, Erie native Will
Knox
andhis partner, Jon
Ulmer
are pre-
miering
their
Erie-filmed
golfmovie
77ie
Turn
at the WarnerTheater on Friday, April 25 at 8p.m.
The Turn
was filmed in
Erie
last fell, using the
Kahkwa
Cluband other Erie locations, as wellas more than 80 extras from the
Erie
area. The film stars FrankCover, best known
aa
Tom Willison
The
Jeffersons,
and his daugh-ter, Susan.
iS
The
Turn
tells the story of Joe,a young man who
will
inherit a
Urge estate ifhe marries within
72hours. The film takes place on agolf course aa Joe plays with hisfather and his father's best friend.A rain delay at
"the
turn"offersopportunities for the love inter-
iltJ11
sts to bl
M
^^
a^HH
Tickets are $5.75
in
advance,
$8 the day of the
show,
and can
be
obtained
by
calling 452-4857.
,«•£
/
*>:*
Felix'
49*
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X
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Dance
0
Pickup it Your DoorDrop Off at
Your
Door.
•+•*;
UveylusW
HUM
Bang
^
nasi
STUPtNTNin
17* up
Student I.D.
Non-Alcohollo
Dance Party
0:00-2:00
Shuttle
Plokup ^Plok
MoCauly Dropup Baldwin off
28oz
Import*
$1 vJnp
Drink*
$1
v
<*"'"
25c
Draft.
DAN?
Retro
11:00
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Disco
FRIDAY
]
N ©Cover J
w/Student
I.D.
2601
Bud
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DrinksWe Have
It
You Get II
$1
i
0;3o
*•*••
T;0
°
s
^*WJTY;
Tn"T"
in its
surprisingly
bloody finale.This is
Pulp Fiction
with heart,
Get Shorty
with
a bra
in.
As enter-tainment,
Grosse Pointe Blank
hits the
bullseye
(come on, you
knew
it
was coming), and the scriptif clever enough that you wishCusack would get behind the type-writer more often.
ij
%n
u i
•:«.
i
».-:M
This Saturday at 4
p
jn.the
Mercy
hurst international Stu-dent Organization are holding abarbecue
for
its members at 4014.those attending
are
encouraged to
bringa dish
rom
heir native coun-tries.Food and refreshments
will
beavailable
and
if there
are
any ques-tions call 2940. students are
a
boreminded to
turn
in
their nomina-tions for next
year's
board
mem-1
ben. 1
J&
I
SALS REPS ILooking for Sale Reps for Telecomclient. If you are looking for a jobthat keeps you in the sunshine; ifyou love dealing with the publicand possess great communicationskills we want you Opportunityexists for the self motivated.
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Call
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ext.398

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