Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1997

The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1997

Ratings: (0)|Views: 15 |Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1997
The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1997

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 27, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/11/2013

pdf

text

original

 
VOL.71
NO.
2MERCYHURST COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE, PA. 16546October
2,1997
McAuley renovations keep Res Life occupied
By Chris
Wloch
Editor-in-Chief
The Office of Residence Lifewas busier than usual
during
thepast few months. According toDirector Tyrone Moore, "Over thesummer we were involved in arather aggressive program to
up-
grade the housing standards
on
thiscampus.'*
These
improvements
i
n-cluded the purchase of 8 newapartment buildings
on
east
B ri
ggswhich have a housing capacity of224 students. Additionally thissummer also saw vast changes inMcAuley Hall, where 18 addi-tional dormitory rooms were cre-ated in the
basement
area that
for-
merly housed the security and cul-tural affairs offices*More than $500,000 was spenton the summer renovations inMcAuley alone, Moore said. Theimprovements
to
the
men's
dormi-tory involved both, interior andexterior changes. A new canopyover the entrance was installed inaddition to landscaping. Curbingaround
the .building
was also in-stalled to prevent cars from driv-ing up onto thelawn,Moore said.
Addi tional 1
y,concrete was poured
,for
a sidewalk that runs from
McAuley's
front door downthrough the grotto. Wooden stairs
were al so buil
t
to provide access tothe gazebo behind the
^Student
Union, he said.The list of interior renovationsto McAuley includes new carpet-ing in every room and in the hall-ways; new sinks, vertical blindsand surge protectors
in
each
dormroom,vending machines,
washers
and dryers on every floor; a newfire alarm and security system, anoverhaul of the lighting and heat-ing systems; re
plastering
of theceilings, repainting
all
of
the
inte-rior walls, and the refinishing ofthe closets, cabinets and otherwoodwork. Separate thermostatswere also installed in every roomso that students could have indi-vidual[over its heating.
*Tm
very pleased with what Isee at this early stage,*' Mooresaid. "The students in McAuleyhave acted very
responsibly
andseem to take a lot of pride in theupgraded facilities. I'm particu-larly proud of
the
residents on thenorth wing of the third floor whoare taking good care of their area.When
:,
they see people leavingthings in the halls, they confrontthem about it and even clean it upthemselves sometimes."
The
renovations
to
McAuley
arestill underway, Moore said. Theremaining work will involve fix-ing the showers
and
 replacing
he
lock and
key system
on dorm
roomNewly referbished entrance to McAuley
Hall*Photo
by Jessica
Russell
doors with a card swipe systemactivated by the residents'Mercyhurst ID cards. McAuleywill
be
used
as
a testing ground forthe new locking system, Moore
said.
If
it
is successful there, plans
will
proceed
to
install
ID
card locksin Baldwin and Egan, he
said.
Moore also said that two bigscreen TVs were ordered, one forMcAuley, the other for Baldwin.The renovations to Baldwin in- withtheinstailationof8newshow-
clude
fixing the entrance doors,repairs and repainting of the
over-
hang at the front of the building,and new furniture, tiling and car-
peting-in
die
lobby. Egan Hall,which
was
converted
to
an all
girlsdormitory this summer, also re-ceived new carpeting in the hall-ways. The bathrooms and laundryareas in Egan were also renovatedens, Moore said.According to Moore, between
90%
and
95%
of theesident
 apart*
ment
buildings were painted this
summer
alone.
At
the
presenttime,residents in the Summer Quad,3924,3926, 3938 and 3940 havereceived notice that appointmentsare now being
accepted*to
havecontinued on page 2
Homecoming Festivities
i
97
By Jim
Gorman
News
Editor %
This year's Homecoming willbe held Friday, Oct.
3.
Pat Liebel,director of alumni services, ex-pressed her anticipation about thelineup for this year. "I think it'sgoing to be our best Homecomingever. There are many alumni
re-
turning for reunions, some fromas far back as the class of '32.""There are a wide variety ofevents and something for every-one,"
she
added.
On Friday, therewill
be an
SA
C-sponsored
bonfireat 8:30
p.m.
behind the Ice Centeron the football practice fields.For those who attended the bon-fire last year, it will be held in thesame location. The student activi-ties committee is hoping to pro-
vide
refreshments and
food,
butthat
has
not been finalized. There-fore, students are encouraged tobring their own hot dogs and
marshmallows
to roast over the
fire.
SAC also will be bringing ste-reo equipment in order to playsome "tunes." SAC is asking allof the Homecoming King andQueen candidates to be in atten-dance at the bonfire.
n
On Saturday, Oct. 4, there willbe a carnival behind the Ice Cen-ter which will
be
sponsored by theStudent Activities Committee. Itwill commence at
10 am.
and willlast until the start of the footballgame, approximately 1 p.m. Im-mediately following the footballgame between Mercyhurst
and
St.Francis, the carnival will resumeand
continue until 10
p.m., weatherpermitting. SAC is expecting avery large
crowd,
and it should bean enjoyable
experience
for all.There will be approximately 20booths at the carnival, seven ofwhich will be sponsored by theSAC.
At one
of their booths, therewill be a
T-shirt
sale. There will
be-two
different
T-shirts
avail-able, one being white
with
a
black
logo,-and
the other a gray shirtwith blue print
The
T-shirt
can
be
Tye-Dyed
at no charge when ashirt
purchase
is
made. A large or
X-large
will cost $7, and an XX-
large
costs $8. All of these shirtsare long sleeved and
will
be soldat cost of production.
(5.
Other booths will representsuch groups as the Social WorkClub, the Criminal Justice Club
who
wi 11
host a
50/50
raffle, and
a
food and
beverace
stand.
Hollywood hits the
'
Hurst
By Randy
HUliard
Campus Life Editor
Upon
the completion of
the Mary
D'AngeloPerforming
Arts Centerlast fall,
Mercy
hurst's
Films ForDiscussion
series found a newhome. The PAC has purchased astate-of-the-art projection andsound system that
will greatly
en-hance viewings.According
to
Michael Fuhrman,Director of the Performing ArtsCenter, "When the series openedat the D'Angelo Performing ArtsCenter last year, it was immedi-ately apparent that our desk top16mm projector, complete witharchaic mono sound, was simplynot adequate for the professionalscreening of our foreign and cul-|
tural
fnovies".
' I
fThe series, which has beenaround for
11
years,
gives
a forumfor. renowned international filmsoverlooked by the local cinemas.With the purchase of a theater qual-ity 35mm projector
and two,
three-way, full range stereo speakersFurhman said that
"although
wewon't
 rival
 Tinsletown,it will
be a
tremendous improvement**Acknowledging the administra-
tion'ssupportforthe recent$
25,000improvement, Fuhrman
looks
to
a
bright future
for education
and en-
tertainment by
 film
 on campus."The
potential
now exists for thePAC
to
host Student Governmentmovienights,which are currentlyshown in the Student Union withan aging 16mmprojectionsystem".The increased resolution andsound quality with a35mm projec-
tor,
coupled with the quality andcontinued
on
page
2
 
PAGE
2THE
MERCIADOctober
2,1997
International News
Njew
Gates in Campus Interior
Afghanistan in Upheaval
By Randy Hilliard
Campus Life Editor
The Asian country of Afghani-stan has been in upheaval for theAccording to Pashtun customs,females are forbidden from work-ing except in the medical field.
Oirls
are not allowed to attend
school and
all
women
are
forced to
rt
rt
past
year
following
*the
Violentgovernment
• takeovef
by (heTaleban
Islamic
Militia.This week showed
no
end
to
theviolence and human rights viola-tions that have plagued the coun-try. A United Nations delegation,headed
by the
European Commis-sioner for Humanitarian Affairs,Emma Bonino, was arrested and
detai ned for
hree hours
by Tel
abanpolice as they investigated gov-ernment abuses near Kabul onTuesday.The Taleban government
.which
is not recognized by the UnitedNations, is made up of AfghanPashtun's. The Pashtun culture isbased in fundamentalist Islamicbeliefs,
Wmch
many, view as
op-
pressive and abusive.
I
wear the traditional burqa, an
Ou-
fit
thai covers them
dompletely
from head to toe.Many human
rights
activists areappalled by' the treatment of
Afghanistani
women and havestarted a letter
writing
campaign tothe Secretary General of the UnitedNations.
"Gross
violations of hu-man
 rights
 and humanitarian con-ventions are taking place in thiscountry
and
the international com-munity cannot accept this," Mrs.
Bonino
told
Reuters news
service.While the U.N. searches for asolution to the dilemma, Boninobelieves that no amount of hu-manitarian aid
will bring
an
end tothis crises. The solution, she says,lies in regional political pressure.
,-- ,
By Chris Wloch
Editor-in- Chief
|j|In
two weeks,
the
stretch
of road-way that next to Garvey Park andpast the front of
Zurn
will be per-manently closed off when two 30by 60 foot cast iron gates are in-stalled. One set of gates will beplaced
neartheentrance toBaldwinHall
and the other will
be
located atthe crossroads to the northeast ofZurn.College President Dr. William
P.
Garvey said that the gates are
bei ng i
nstalled to protect the
safety
of students in
the
campus
interior.
"Students
shouldn't have to lookover their
shoulders
when walkingto class.
Some
of
the cars that
have
driven
through there
move
too
fast,
and
there
was
always
the
potentialfor a serious accident The new
gates will reduce
traffic
in
the
inte-
rior by 85
percent,"
he said.Garvey said the gates will beopen on' moving days so thatBaldwin residents have access. Aspecial ID card will also allow
Starvation in North
KoreaiLeads
to Murder
By
James Gorman
News Editor
In
North Korea the people aretaking desperate measures becauseof
a
severe lack of food.According to the North ChinaMorning
Post,
a
North Korean de-serter
claimed
that
the
people havestarted killing others and sellingtheir lesh.People
are
going insanewith hunger and some are killingtheir
own
children,
a
phenomenon
not uncommon in other parts of theworld. In August a woman wasexecuted for killing
18
children inthe western port of Ham hung.
\
jit
has been estimated that overone million people have alreadydied
in the
famine.
The
North
Ko-
rean government insists thatfloods, droughts
and
crop
failures
are
the cause of starvation. Mean-while
the
government is withhold-ing food supplies from China andthe U.N. and distributing it to themilitary.Few citizens openly blame thegovernment because of the Confu-cian ideal of absolute obedienceand respect for the governmentSince challenging leader
Kim
Jong-11
is impossible, people areseeking asylum in other countries.
As
part of
the
celebration of October as GayHistory Month* National Coming
Ont
Day isheld every year on Oct
11.
OnTuesday,Oct
14,
a meeting for
persons
of all sexual orienta-tions who rapport the rights of gay, lesbian,and bisexual individuals
will be held
at 6 p.m.upstairs in the Union's Student GovernmentChambers. For the first meeting we
will
dis-cuss the possibility of a campus organizationdedicated to building bridges between straightpeople and; sexual minorities. If you cannotattend the meeting
but
are interested in joiningour efforts, please contact Vivian Tamburelloat x2468 or
Chris
Wloch at x2376.
"Hollywood,"
cont'd from p. 1quantity of films released in this
format-will
give
the
college
a
bet-
ter selection of programs.
]This
that
students
may
be
able toenjoy hit movies without waitingthe six to seven months that ittakes for the film companies totransfer the blockbuster's from35mm to
the
16mm formatI This years Films for Discussion
Series
kicks off
at
8 p.m.
Wednes-day Oct 8 with
"When
We WereKings", a documentary about the1974 heavyweight championship
f
ght
between Muham mad A li
and
George
Foreman. Tickets are
free
for students and President's CardHolders, $3 for adults and $2 forstudents and seniors.
In a
few
weeks,
new cast
iron gates will prevent
cars from
driving
on
this stretchof road
where students
often
wal
k.
Photo:
Jessica Russell
passvenders, mail delivery trucks andhandicapped persons
to^
through the gates.
j&H
According to Garvey, all of
the
renovation and campus improve-
ment y
projects conducted atMercyhurst over the past severalmonths have produced dramaticeffects.
"It's
an
enormous
amountof change,*' he said,
"the
greatestwork that's been done in the 18years that I've been here.""McAuley," cont'd from p. 1their apartments repainted.According to Moore, the roomson
Egan's
third floor are next onthe list for repainting.All laundry rooms and the frontdoors of every Briggs apartmentbuilding will also be receiving a
fresh coat
of paint
in
the upcomingmonths. The only resident build-
ing to not be
repainted this year isBaldwin, which Moore said was
pai nted
in its entirety
ust
last yean
"It
will
be
painted again
this
sum-
mer,"
Moore
added*
<
A
majority
of the eight
new
apart-
ment
buildings on
east Briggs werealso repainted, Moore
said.
Close
to 40%
of
them
received
new
car-
peting, he
added.
"We received the new buildings
in
fairly
decen t
shape," Moore
said.
"In
fact,
we ended up hiring themanager from Spiegel Realtors asthe foreman of housing mainte-nance. He is very knowledgeableof the many concerns of thesenew apartment complexes."The maintenance staff is han-dling
this
year's work
orders
at asteady pace,
Moore
added.
At thebeginning of the term, the numberof work orders was more than
1,200,
now
there
are less than
200that still
need
to be
completed,
hesaid. Since summer ended, morethan $80,000 has been spent onthe recarpeting of more than 100living facilities, he said.During the upcoming year,Moore will
finalize
the plans tobegin next summer's extensiverenovations to the BaldwinTownhouses and
all
of
the
apart-
ments
on
north and
south
Briggs."My
office
is going to take amore
proactive
stance on address-
ing
the needs of
the
student body.If students look
at the
bigger
pic-ture,
they'll see
that*we
do farmore than many other colleges,"he said.
Spring Break
'98-
Sell Trips,
Earn Cash
&
GoFree!!!
Student Travel
is
now
hiring
campusreps/group organizers. Lowest
rates
to Mexico,Florida
&
Jamaica. Call
1-800-648-4849.
 
October
2,1997
THEMERCIADPAGE
3
I- ' IIIIIIIIIIIII
J_I
I
1
IIi
Alcohol atthe Hurst
By Amy
Schmttt
Contributing Writer
Already in our first week ofclasses,
gatherings have
been bro-ken up because of loud and bois-terous behavior and consumptionof alcohol. Security has
been
j;
infull force the last couple of
week-
ends and, according to Residents
Assistant
Heather Barron, a seniorwho also works for
security,
thePennsylvania Liquor ControlBoard
(L.C.B.) has
frequented ourcampus lately.Alcohol
is no
stranger on collegecampuses including
Mercy
hurst
Campus
R.A.S
have
said that alco-hol rules
will be
much stricter from
now
on.
As
of this point, the housing of-fice has not made definite alcoholrules and regulations for
this
year.Finalized rules will be made afterthe Housing Office meets withStudent GovernmentHowever, some rules have been
pre-decided.
The newest of theserules is that there are to be noclosed containers outside yourapartment
For
the
past three years
I have attended Mercyhurst, andwalking around with closed con-tainers was permissible (i.e. waterbottles). R.A.s, like
Barron,
arebothered by this because they haveto try to enforce a rule that hasnever been
ia
effect before.!!The reason for
the change is
be-cause one night last year, likemany times before, an excessivenumber of students occupied thebasketball courts in front of theold townhouses. like previoustimes before
security
broke it up
and
forced the
students
to disperse.
However,
the students refused toleave. As a
result,
the Erie
Polic
Department was called to break upthe commotion. 1
•The
new rules
have been
imple-mented to avoid future problemsthat might
occur,"
said Barron.As long as students do not causeany problems, there is no reasonfor security to stop their fun."Both security and
R.A.S
are
just
doing their jobs
and
following
the
rules.Maybe students
should
con-sider making their jobs easier byfollowing the rules before schoolofficials crack down and the "dry
44
What's wrong?
Let's
talk about sex
By Randy Hilliard
Campus Life Editor
This is the first in a series ofarticles which
will deal with
issues
that touc h every one on col lege
cam-puses nation wide. It is my hope
thati<bringing
these issues to theforefront of our consciousness willhelp to make a positive impact oncampus life.I do not aim to tell you what iswrong or right because these aredecisions that one must make for
him or
herself.
However,
I
intend toinform you the reader that theseconcerns really
do
existThis week's topic is SEX. There
is
nothing
on
this earth
more sacredthan the
love shared and
manifested
between two people. However, ashas happened since the beginningof time, humans distort and alien-ate
their'understanding
from thetrue essence of most everything.This truth can be attributed to anynumber of things
in
our society,from education to
culture*to
up-bringing.My point, you ask? Simply this,
"What
issex?"
Is it
a primal urge,
ahuman
need, an amusement,
the act
of
procreation,
physical
manifesta-
tion of love, all of
the
above?
What is
it, then, that
makes
thisvery human action wrong at times?I assert
that it
is
"appropriateness
".Even
if
one chooses to disregardmy take on the subject (sex is the
man i fes tati on
of
love
between twopeople), we are still left with thequestion, "Is it appropriate?" Weall,
 regardless
 of ourage,genderor station in life must ask our-selves this before we engage inany activity, sex included.At this point
I
must broaden thedefinition of
our
topic to any sexrelated action, such as verbal in-nuendoes and physical
contact,
however slight or
menial
we maydeem them.As tempted as I am to get on a
soap box
and preach
about casual
sex, I will leave that issue alonefor now and deal with a morepressing aspect of
the
topic. Whatcould make sex inappropriate?Many say that it is any uninvitedact that could be construed as an
-*
invasion df one's jjersonal prWacy
or create an hostile environment.'These
terms
may
seem
vague,
and
there is a reason forthis.
Human,
sexuality is vague. We all differon the amount of sexuality withwhich we are comfortable. What
one i
may think insignificant an-other may view with shock andhorror.This is the world we live in andmust adapt to, because only thestrong survive. In this context weare talking about mental strengthand knowing when
to
control our-
se 1 ves and our mos t pri mal
of urges.Mercyhurst College is not im-mune to sexual offences. A largeportion of harassments, rapes andindecent
sexual assaults are
attrib-uted to a lack of self control in-volving drugs and alcohol. Noneof which are reasonable
defenses
for a sexual offender. The fact isthat no one has the right to makedecisions for another
person.
It isfar
too
easy
to
be
egocentric
whiledisregarding
the
 rights
 of others. Itis time for us all to recognize thisdilemma. If
you
>
need
help, it isavailable and
no one will
think theless of
you
for seeking assistance.Anyone needing to talk
about
thismaycontactMercyhurs.tCoun
T
selling Services at
exlr
2468.
Weekly hours are from
10
am. to4 p.m. on Monday, 10 a.m. to 6'jkm. on Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 8:30p.m. on Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to4:30 p.m.
on
Thursday,
9
a.m.
to
4pirn, on
Friday,and3
p.m.
to6
p.m.on Sunday.
MSG News: Vacant Positions Filled
campus
By
James Gorman
News Editor
Mercyhurst Student Governmentheld its weekly meeting
at«8:30
p.m. Sept 30 in the MSG Cham-bers, upstairs in the Student Union.MSG Secretary
Emilio
Colaia-covo opened the meeting and re-
ported
on the meeting
that
he hadwith Tom
Billingsley,
vice presi-dent of the college. They discussedthe topic of picnic tables
on
Briggs,and it was concluded that eachquad will have one picnic table.The computer
lab is currentl
y look-ing for more work studies so thatthey can keep the lab open
longer
hours. Starting this weekend, thelab will have longer hours to ac-commodate more people.
The
weight
room was also
a
topic
of discussion, and the students con-tinue to vent their frustration over
"the school's i nability to
 remedy
heproblems that exist in the weightroom.Treasurer
Ryan Kennis said that
the
deposits from
the
video
games
in
the Union
and
the proceeds fromthe coffee house were collected
as
well.
I
Vice
President Tom Bender ex-pressed his thanks* to those whoattended the Dr. Jack Levin lec-ture and for
making it
a smashingsuccess. The next lecture will beheld on Oct 9 at 8 p.m. at theD' Angelo Performing Arts Cen-ter. The lecturer will be
Rebecca
Ruggles-Radcliffe
and
her lecture
isentitled,"Untangling
Emotions:Food and Body Hatred*', and itwill concentrate on eating
disor-
ders. The vacant junior positionwas filled
by
Nora Grace.President Kevin Segedi talkedabout the possibility of donatingmoney to the United Way. Lastyear
the
Board of
Trustees praisedthe efforts
of
MSG
for exceedingtheir goal.Segedi
also said
that
he was
dis-appointed with
the
poor turnout atthe fall fun fest and that publicitywill be better for upcoming MSGand SAC events. Lastly, The Se-nior Senator position
was
 filled
 byEmilio Colaiacovo. '
*]
The campus
phone
book shouldbe
 ready
 by
the
middle
of October.Jodie Polk and Nora Grace werenominated to be the Junior classchairpersons for the Senior dinnerdance, and
will
be
assisting Jennye
Vetter and Sarah Allen.
<
Finally, the problem with thephones in Mercy apartments andDuval was discussed after manystudent were infuriated. Also, thevending machines in McAuleyweren't giving out correct change.In addition, the ballet of Wednes-day Oct 24 was inconvenient forcommuter students who neededparking for their night classes.
Students Need^Our Library
By Kristin Bidinger
Contributing Writer
Although the
Hammermill
Li-
brary *re-opened its'.doors
to pa-trons on Monday,
Sept,
22, manystudents have taken notice of itsincompleteness.
Parts
of thelibrary's facilities and a portion
of
its resources may
be
used, though
renovationst
are still underway.Mercyhurst students have reactedin
various
ways to the construc-tion.Junior dietetics major, CarrieSmith said, "I
have?had
severalprojects
that I have not been able
toresearch here at school.*'Smith said that she has been inclass prior to the rest of theMercyhurst students, because sheis in an adjunct class at Gannon.Therefore, she has been
affectedfor a
few
more weeks
than the rest
of
the
Mercyhurst jxjpuiatoon-l .„
Junior Heidi
Melancon-said,
"Ihaven't
I
had a place for properstudy, or research for certainclasses."
Melancon
also noted that
one
of
her classes
had
to be
modi-fied at the
beginning
of the termbecause of
a lack
of resource mate-rial in the library.Research material
is not the
rea-son for fresher Shaun Murphy toshow concern for the library.
Murphy,
who
 resides
n
McAuleyHall said,
"In
the closing of thelibrary,
I-have
not gotten accus-tomed to the new facility, and I
have not had
a quiet
place
to study.
The dorms are
pretty loud.**Students such
as
Smith have had
to use
re sources
from
other 1 i
brat-
ies.
Smith;said,;
"In,my)clinical
dietetics course I have had to domy research at
Gannon,
Edinboro
and
Hamot
Medical Center.
**
Se-nior
Gina Parker also said
that shehad to go to the Erie Public Li-brary, which
is 10 minutes
away.These students all agree that
the
benefits of the construction willoutweigh the inconvenience theyare
enduring
now. Murphy said,
Although'it
has been difficult,
once the library is
finished
we will
have access to more informationand be in a better environment,which is what we paid for.
.
41

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->