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The Merciad, Oct. 9, 1997

The Merciad, Oct. 9, 1997

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The Merciad, Oct. 9, 1997
The Merciad, Oct. 9, 1997

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VOL.
71 NO.
3
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE, PA. 16546October
9,1997
Third iyear student dies at age 20
By
Chris Wloch
f
Editor-in- Chief
A
funeral service was held on Saturday, Oct. 4 forYvonne Anntoinette Ransom,
20,
of
1107 East
4th street.The 1 p.m. service took place at Mount
Ebal
BaptistChurch
with the
Rev.
Willie Sandersofficiating.Yvonnedied Tuesday, Sept. 30, at
Hamot
Medical Center. The
cause
of death
was
undetermined, although Yvonne wasadmitted to the hospital after experiencing severe chest
pains.
Yvonne
was born in Erie on
Nov. 15,1976, the daughter
of Wi 11 ie
Leroy
and Cara
Heidelberg Ransom.
In
additionto her parents, she is survived by a brother, RichardDarnellRansom,and
his
wife Jennifer, both of
Erie;
hermaternal grandmother Dorothy
Ree
Heidelberg of
Erie;
her paternal grandmother Sedera Ransom of
Erie;
and aniece.Yvonne graduated
from East
High School
in
Erie.
She
was
a
third year student
at
Mercy
hurst
who had
majored
in marketing and was also employed as an operator atTeletron Marketing.Yvonne's cousin, Suzie Dobbs, a sophomore philoso-phy major, transferred
to
Mercy hurst this
year.
Suzie saidthat
the
first
lime
she saw her cousin
on
campus was theday before
she
passed away.Additionally,
Suzie
recalled that although
Yvonne
en-
joyed
her
job talking on the telephone, she was a veryquiet girl even around
those
whom she knew well. "At
work
she
would
do
what she came
to
do
and
then
leave."
Yvonne Ransom 1976-1977
"Yvonne
was the
type
of person
who
really
spoke only
whenspoken
to,
even in a family setting," Suzie added.
"We
calledher
'the
family churchmouse' because she was so
quiet.
She
gave me
my
nickname
'Smiley'
and
she
always used to
callme 'Little Red Riding Hood' because my mother woulddress me in red at
family
gatherings when we were kids.Along with her older brother, Yvonne used to make melaugh all day. She had a great sense of humor."According to Suzie, Yvonne enjoyed good
jokes,
read-
ing
andmusic.
"Her
favorite gospel song
was
'His
Eye
ison the Sparrow.' One of her close friends sang it at herfuneral," Suzie said.This
year
is
going
to be
especially
hard,
said
Suzie, who
is a
month younger than her cousin, because
the
two girlswould have celebrated their
21
st birthdays together."For
me
personally,
her
passing was a recognition thattomorrow
is
never a
promise
to anyone,"
Suzie
said.
"Younever really notice how much you miss someone untilshe's
gone.
Yvonne was such a sweet person and a goodlistener, too. But you didn't need to have a conversationwith her to get a sense of the type of person she was."
^Ms.
Betty Damper, Director of Act
101,
who helpedYvonne register for classes
several
times,
also remembersher as a shy, silent young woman."Yvonne told
me
once that she was inspired by an auntof
hers,
a professional
woman
who
placed
a
high value oneducation. Her aunt
served as a role model to
her," Damper^
said.
jtSuzie
said
that
at the funeral service on Friday, her cousin
was
described as "the angel
who
kept
quiet,
but will soon
speak.
Her halo is waiting for
her
in heaven," she said.
Library's third floor re-opens
By
Chris Wloch
Editor-in-Chief
On Monday, Oct. 7, the Ham-mermill Library reopened
its
thirdfloor for use by patrons. Accord-ing to Dr. Roy Strausbaugh, deanof libraries, the majority of thecollection is now available."Students and faculty now haveaccess to all
of
the library's mate-
rials
except for
the
oversize
bookswhich
have not yet been
unpacked.Most of the collection is nowready thanks to my hard-working
|
staff.
Despite the construction,
they
have the place up and running."After the concrete is poured forthe sidewalk
during
the middle ofOctober, library patrons will beable to walk in the recently con-structed entrance, Strausbaughsaid.
"In
three weeks students will
be entering through
the new
door."By that time, the librarians will
also
be
using
the new
round circu-lation desk which
will
be locatedto the left of
the
entrance.
At the
present
time,
constructioncrews
are*
also setting up newshelves in the space behind the
desk.
Several more reference com-puters will also be set up in theclosed- off area which is now be-
ing
recarpeted.According to Strausbaugh, theGreat Reading Room located inthe area of Weber Hall that
for-
merly housed the dance studiosshould be open sometime in No-vember. Also, the educationdepartment's curriculum librarycollection will be moved over inthe next month or two.College President Dr. William
P.
Garvey said that some planshave also been decided for thefourth floor, which is still underconstruction. The upper level willinclude a language lab, a boardroom, the new Tullio room, andpossibly
the
offices for
the
honorsprogram,
he
said.The tower on the northeast cor-ner of the building will include a
room
for meetings, Garvey
added.
Additionally, a seven foot Celticcross will
be
placed
on the top
anda large stained glass window witha design
that
prominently
*
featur-
es an "M"
will
be
installed.
"It
willbecome the signature tower ofMercyhurst
and
will
appear
on
thecollege's stationary in the future,he said.As a result of
the
construction,the library has increased in size
from
40,000
square
feet
to
65,000.
Because of
this
additional space,Garvey said that there are alsoplans in the works to increase thesize of the library's collection."Over the next decade we aregoing to increase the
library's
hold-
ings by adding close to
5,000
books a year. Our long term goalis to raise the number of volumes
from
150,000 to a quarter
million,"Garvey said.
Parents' Weekend
By
James
Gorman
News Editor
The weekend of
Oct
10-12 is Parents' Weekend at Mercyhurst Col-
lege.
The purpose
is
to
introduce
the
parents
to a segment
of
the
activitiesat Mercyhurst. They
will
be given
a
comprehensive tour of
the
campusand even get to try the cafeteria food. The Alumni office has a whole
lineup
of
activities
and entertainment scheduled.Parents are instructed to register on Friday from 6-9 p.m. HypnotistMark
Pittman
will be returning to put on another dazzling demonstra-tion. This weekend will mark the seventh year that Pittman will beperforming during Mercyhurst's Parents' Weekend. According toMercyhurst student
Chris
Coan,
"Pittman
usually
has
20-25 students
on
stage in order
to
hypnotize them."
;
i
On
Saturday
Oct
11,
there
will be
a
breakfast held
in the
Egan DiningHall at
8
a.m. Between
9
and
11
a.m.
parents will
be
given
a
tour of
the
college
and an
opportunity
to
meet
the
faculty. Following
lunch
at
11:30
a.m. there will be a football game between Mercyhurst and
cross
town
rival
Gannon University. Finally,
on
Saturday,
a
dinner
will
be
held forthe students and their families. Mercyhurst College President Dr.William P. Garvey will address those who attend the dinner. Parentsmay also visit the
Cummings
Art Gallery in the D'Angelo PerformingArts Center
on
Friday and Saturday between
2-5
p.m.On Sunday, there will be a liturgy at 10 a.m. and brunch in thecafeteria from
10
a.m. to noon. This will conclude Parents' Weekend.
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD October
9,1997
151
«
y
American
faces
death penalty
in
Cuba
By Randy
Hilliard
Campus Life
Editor^
Walter
Van Der
Veer,
ajFlorida
resident has been charged
by
theCuban government
withf *Promoting
armed action againstfCuba."Van Der Veer allegedly smuggled
U.S.
military uniforms
into
Cubaand unsuccessfully
attempted §io obtain gunsfand
grenades, whichprosecutors
claim were to be
used
in
an attempt
to
overthrow CubanPresident Fidel Castro.
Injaddition
to the smuggling and weaponscharges, Van
Der|Veer
has been accused of
^printing
anti-Castroleaflets,
Iwhich weref
spread throughout Havana in February
and
March of
1997|
|
f|
§ ' |'
||1|
^^&'
|
»
The/trial, which was to begin last
Frida|l
has
beer|postponed
according
to
court sources. Van
Der Veer
has
been
assigned
a
publicdefender, who has only been in contact with the defendant
this
pastweek. Although his personal lawyer plan!
to attendfhe
may act onlyas
an^advisor.
According|to a
U.SJ
State Department official, arepresentative from
theftJ.S.
Interest'*section in Havana*wi|l
bepermitted
tb attend*but no
media will
bellowed
to
monitor the
trial.
\
Jf.
convicted;
Van
Der.
Yefer will
possibly face the death penaltyaccording to the prosecutions
initialffindingsf
While it is out of the
|hands
of the United
States
government,
U.S.
authorities feel that thepenalty is rather
stiff.
U.S
enforces no-fly zone in Iraq
By James Gorman
News Editor
The United States Navy, in response to Iranian attacks on
targets
in
Iraq (his
week, has instructed the aircraft carrier
Nimitz
to go tothe Persian Gulf
to
enforce the
no-fly
zone established in southernIraq.
f
Defense Secretary William Cohen instructed the 73,000 tonNimitz, carrying
50
F-14A and
F/A-18
combat aircraft to go to thegulf immediately, along with six other warships which will assist
U.S.
enforcement of
the
the no-fly zone over Iraq.The original goal of
the
Navy was to protect
Iraqi Shi'ites
fromthe Iranian air force, and the
U.S.
had not taken a stand on Iranianattacks of the Mujahideen, their major opposition.However, Defense Department spokesman Kenneth Bacon said"The United States has told Iran it could shoot down planes if
they
try to violate the no-fly
zone."
It is the intention of
the
U.S.
toenforce the
no-fly
zones established by the U.N. Security Council.The purpose of
the
added security is to
prevent
Iraqi PresidentSaddam Hussein from using the Iranian action as a catalyst to seekrevenge.Analyst Judith Kipper, Middle East expert at the Center for Interna-tional and Strategic Studies told Reuters News Service, "We are incharge of
security
in the
Gulf,
and the Iranians will not be allowed
|to fl >
in American controlled territory with impunity."The
| roblem
with the Mujahideen bases is that they are very closeto thi Iranian border, allowing Iranian planes to make hit and runraids without entangling
U.S.
patrols.
Ifewis
BLCE arrests two over the weekend
By
James Gorman
News Editor
This
past
weekend,
the
Pennsyl-vania Bureau of Liquor
Control
Enforcement
(BLCE)
visited cam-
pus.
They have made it back toeach homecoming in recent
years.
An officer of
the
BLCE said it istheir
duly
ho enforce the liquor
code
and uphold
statutes
of
he
lawregarding some 22,000 liquor
and
beer sales outlets in,
the
state ofPennsylvania. Not only do
they
handle these cases, but they alsohave
the
responsibility of prevent-ing underage drinking, gambling
and
speak-easies.Most of their actions are com-plaint driven, meaning that theyare contacted to handle distur-bances in the community. Theyalso perform minor controls,
which include
random
searches of
bars and college campuses.The office of the BLCE locatedin the Erie area has jurisdictionover seven counties in NorthwestPa, but
the/
1
are part of the StatePolice which means that they canbe
invol
ved anywhere in the stateof Pa. They differ from
the
LiquorControl Board because the LCB
handles
licensing
while the BLCE
enforces the laws created by the
LCB.
They work in. conjunctionwith campus security and usuallyinform
them that they will
be com-
ing
prior to their arrival..
A
ser-
geant of
the
BLCE said that theywill actively
.pursue
underagedrinking, and
that they
will
be
fre-quenting the campus throughoutthe school year.
As a result
of this weekend's ap-pearance, they made two arrestsfor underage drinking and disor-derly conduct. Campus securityalso said that the upperclassmenare responsible for students who
come to
their residence for a party,and that they can
be
charged withaiding
the
delinquency of a minor.Director of Security Ken Sidunsaid, "One female student wastaken to the hospital for alcohol 1poisoning. There is
a
general con- pus might face.cern for the student body of thecollege."It
is
apparent
that
alcohol
is
pos-ing a serious threat to the generalwelfare of college students,
a
sce-
nario that is being played out oncampuses across the country. Con-
sumption
of
alcohol is
also leadingto fights on campus, particularlybetween
the di f
erent sports
teams.
In addition, there is an increasedpossibility of
an
accident becauseof
the
fact that students are goingback and forth between Briggsapartments
and
the
newly
acquired
East Briggs
and Lewis apartments.Security officer
Eric
Kraus said,"It is not practical for students toget
'drop
dead drunk' and intend to
get
away with it. It is not accept-able
in everyday
life,
nor is it a
realworld scenario." Hypothetically,if a person was acting inappropri-ately in downtown Erie, Pa be-cause of drunkenness, he or shewould be
subject
tothes.punish-
ments
that someone on this cam-
4'wJ
News
By Chris Coan
Contributing Writer
Last weekend, the Student Ac-tivities Committee held a bonfireon
Oct.
3
and
a
Carnival on
Oct.
4for this year's Homecoming cel-ebration.
The event went
well,
butlike most things, SAC is lookingfor suggestions to make theseevents better for next year.On Wednesday* Oct.
1,
the
Cof-
feehouse Committee had ScottFetrig come in and draw carica-
tures.
Those students who showed|up
were pleased with the resultsand hopefully we will have himback for another coffeehouse.On the same day, the tourna-ments committee
had a
spirit con-test for the men's soccer game atFamily First Sports Park, but no-body showed up.Next weekend is midterms, soSAC will not
be planning a
movieor coffeehouse, but the followingweekend is the home opener forthe hockey team. They will playagainst Penn State on Friday the
17th at
7:30 p.m. in
the Ice
Center.The Tournaments Committee isgoing to have a spirit contest, sodress up in your blue and green andcome support the hockey team.On Saturday, Oct.
18,
SAC willbe making a trip to the
movies.
|
This is your chance to see one ofthe hot movies that is playing.Watch for
the
signs telling the ex-act movie
that we are going to
see.
SAC needs your support in pro-viding ideas and feedback of theactivities that
we
are planning. Youcan contact the SAC
office
at ex-tension
2463
or attend our weeklymeetings
on
Tuesdays at
8
p.m. inthe Student Government Cham-bers upstairs in the Union. Or callthe Activities Hotline at 2093 tofind out
more about our
upcomingevents.Alpha
Phi
Sigma and the Criminal Justice Club will beholding their 4th Annual haunted House on Saturday,
Oct.
25 and Sunday, Oct
26.
In order to prepare for this
event,
it would be appreciated if all vehicles would beout of the fully enclosed parking garage by
S
p.m. onFriday, Oct 24. Thank you for your cooperation.
Chemistry
StudentPresents Research
By Jamz Porzio
Staff Writer
I
On Tuesday,
Oct.
7,
at
3:45
p.m.,Mike Karabinos presented his re-search on
"Computational
Studyof Metal Containing Polymers by
Electronic
Structure Theory" in the
Zurn
computer
lab.
Over the
sum-mer Karabinos presented at theUniversity ofPittsburgh, where hewas conducted this research andearned
$2800.
-;%
About 30 students and teachersattended the presentation.
With
the
use
of
a
computer projector
screen
and the temptation of
extra
creditand a bowl of candy, chemistrymajors from all over campuscame to observe evidence of thefact that
Mike has
mastered
the
artof an effective presentation.His state of
the
art research wasdone mostly on a computer so asnot to come into contact with anyof
the
toxic molecules,
"I
was very glad to be a part of
that
research. It
was a good
oppor-tunity that I think a lot of peopleshould
pursue,"
Karabinos said.Karabinos' presentation is thefirst of
a
seven part series of semi-
nars by students in the biology and I
chemistry departments.
 
October
9,1997
THE MERCIAD
KTMAEVVVWX
W
PAGE
3
GS&»
*»*X
mMiii
}
By Randy
Hffliard
Campus Life Editor
What's Wrong? Eating Disorders
Last
week
I talked about sex and
its
place in our
world.
It's a ratherbroad issue that effects everysingle
one.of
us on some level.This week I will discuss some-thing even more personal andpri-vate: eating disorders, primarilyanorexia and bulimia nervosa. Thepoints of this
article are not
aimedat
any on
e directly,
but we
all knowsomeone who's
suffered
or
is
suf-
fering from this type of problem.
Why
do people starve
themselves
or resort to
binging
and
purging?
Iam no
expert,
nor do I pretend tobe.But I watch my share of televi-sion and keep a careful eye onadvertising campaigns. Our soci-ety is so materialistic and con-cerned with
the
physical elementsof a person
that
our sole concern ismerely what a person looks like.We place absolutely no commer-cial emphasis on the wonders ofthe human mind or the incredibledepth of human personality. Withthe negative elements of a maledominated society it
is no surprise
that
women,
the largest populationeffected by eating disorders, fall
into
this chasm of self deprivation.I'm sure that
I
have just
made
athousand enemies. But what I amsaying is this. First, the emphasisof our society is wrong, and sec-ond, our market economy feedsoff perpetuating this dilemma. Idon't propose that we can make adifference in ad campaigns
by
set-ting up a boycott of Revlon prod-ucts, but we
need to
see
people
forwho they reallyare.
*
If we continue
in
this pattern ofonly recognizing and appreciating
the
physical attributes of a person
we
are just as guilty of promotingphysical prejudices
as the
money-hungry super capitalists whocharge us exorbitant
I
prices forsubstandard products.
We
need tochange the formula of the law ofsupply and demand to a demandfor intellectual superiority ratherthan just physical beauty.
Now
that
I have
gotten
all
of thatoff of my chest
and
into
the
open,
let's get
back
to
the
dilemma.
Whatcan you do if
you
have an eating
disorder?
Find
someone you
trust,preferably your family doctor orsomeone
at
the
Cohen
Health Cen-ter located in* Preston 101,
ext.
2431 and talk
with
ahem abouttreatments. There
is NO
SUBSTI-TUTE for proper
treatment.
Anor-exia and bulimia nervosa arediseases and ignoring the symp-toms can be deadly.What if your friend is sufferingfrom
an eating
disorder?
The most
important thing
is to
besupportive.Under no circumstances shouldyou criticizethem—doing so
may
just hinder
them
 from
 seekingfurther help. It is certain that wecannot just will them to get well
and!badgering
them may onlymake the problem more intense.Encourage them to get help anddo not try to win their war forthem. If you want to talk with
someone
about
how to cope
with afriend who has an eating disordercontact either
Campus
Ministry atext
2429
or
the
Counselling Cen-ter at
ext/2468.<
Speaker to address; active nonviolence
By Dave Robinson
Contributing Writer
Whether
we like it
or
not,
most
ofus are enrolled in a class called
••Violence
101."
Our
teachers
arethe
media,
with their flow of vio-lent
images
and messages and oursociety's values of consumerism,rugged individualism and superi-ority. Consciously or not, we arecontinually being schooled in thelogic and practice of emotional,physical or structural violence.What do we learn from theselessons?
First,
we are taught that
the
world
is
a dangerous
place and
that human
beings
are intrinsicallyviolent This is especially true ofour enemies, who are the mostviolent and are beyond redemp-tion or change. Faced with thesecold
facts
we learn our secondles-son: the only way to deal withviolence is to accomodate it, avoidit or employ violence ourselves.Television, our families and gov-
eminent policies[ teach
us thesemethods, which we then try inreal life.The great illusion of violence isthat it
will
solve our problems de-
cisively
Unfortunately,
conflictsoften do not end when violence isused; they^ generally continue tosmolder or escalate.Jesus, Gandhi,
\
Dorothy
Day,Martin Luther King,
Jr.
and manyothers
have
declared their lives an
alternative to the
treadmill of vio-lence. They have preached andpracticed active nonviolence asthe way to resolve conflict hu-manely and effectively,
to
becomegenuinely human, and
to be
faith-ful to the Nonviolent God?'Woundedness lies at the root ofviolence in ourselves,'in othersand
in
our culture.
Active
nonvio-lence comes face to face with
these
wounds.
This
includes iden-
tifying
and gradually transformingour personal and social "scripts"that keep us in
the
rut of violence.But
even
more profoundly, activenonviolence makes contact with
the
sacred ness
that
lies deeper thanour wounds.This sacredness is the presenceof the God who longs for
our
wholeness. It is where our
truest
selves live, the depths where wereceive the gift of our richness,our authenticity and our capacityfor compassion.On Monday, Oct 13, you canhear more about the NonviolentGod and the Catholic tradition ofactive nonviolence when
interna-
tional lecturer and activist BruceKent speaks on
"Christians and
Violence"
at
7:30p.m.
inthe
MercyHeritage Room of Sullivan Hall.Come and learn more about thetradition
that continues to heal
thebroken ness of everyday relation-ships in anyone with the courageand imagination to
step
out of thecycle of violence.
EXCELLENT EXTRA
INCOME
NOW!
ENVELOPE STUFFING $600 -
$800
every weekFree details:
SASE to
International Inc.1375 Coney Island Ave.Brooklyn, New Yorkll230
Homecoming
t
97
By J im
Gorman
News Editor
This past weekend, Mercy hursthosted
its
homecoming wherealumni return
ho
campus to seefamiliar faces and talk to friends.As always, the homecoming kingand queen were elected and thewinners were announced at thefootball game.Nominations for
king and queenwere held on
Sept.
22 and
23.
Afterthe election, the six men andwomen with the most votes be-
came
finalists. The candidates forking were Kevin Segedi, TomBender, Aaron Stankiewiz, JohnCrane, Avery
Jon
is and LeonMedvic. The women were NoraGrace,
JennyeVetter,
Sarah Allen,Jen Hamelly, Karen Milinovichand Stacie Bortz.The election was held on Oct 1and 2 and there was an excellentvoter turnout with about 500 bal-
lots
cast.
The winners
were Aaron
Stankiewiz
and
Jen
Hamelly.
Last
yearsTwinners*Ron Ramol^ana
Fran
Foltz
presented
the new
win-
ners
with their crowns and flowersduring half-time of the footballgame.MSG Secretary
Emilio
Coiaia-covo said, "I was
proud]of
theturnout and would like to extendmy gratitude to everyone
who
made
it
possible." Coiaiacovo
also
saidthat they could
not have
asked fora better day in terms of the wea-ther
and the
turnout
was
good too.According to SAC memberChris Coan, the first carnival onSaturday was also a success.Coan said that the event helpedout several different
clubs
and or-ganizations on campus.
T-shirt
sales went
well
and the remainingshirts will
be
]
on sale at coffeehouse
on
Wednesdaynights.SACstands included games like
basket-
ball
and
golf,
and Circle K and the
Criminal Justice,
Social
Work andPsychology clubs all had success-ful stands as well.
The only
drawback
was the
loca-
tion. Coan said that they intendto move it to a more accessibleplace next
year.JSftSAC
is-
also
taking suggestions' and
critfcf smf
in
order
to make next year's
carni-val even more attractive.Homecoming Queen and King: Jen Hamelly and Aaron Stankiewiz

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