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The Merciad, April 29, 1999

The Merciad, April 29, 1999

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The Merciad, April 29, 1999
The Merciad, April 29, 1999

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£3
Vol 72 No. 17
Mercy hurst
College •
501 E 38th
St. • Erie* Pa,16546April
29,1999
Smoke damage! extensive
-ini
Egan Hall fire
Studentstemporarilyrelocated to
Holiday
jinn
duringrenovations
By Carrie Tappe
Merciad
editorA
fire
on the third
 floor
 of EganHall, room
56,
left
39
residentsin alternative housing for theweekend.
\
Erie fire
department officialssaid Wednesday that
the
actualcause of
the
fire is still underinvestigation.College officialssaid that the student will not beheld responsible for the fire.
4
The fire
was
smal
1
in .nature, but created a fair
amount
of smoke,**
Tyrone
Moore,director of housing, said. "Wewere fortunate that
no one
washurt
Or
injured."
The
fire
started around
11:40
p.
m.
Friday
evening,and wasfirst detected by Bob Share, the
night
desk security worker.Campus
police
and safetyofficers, Erie police, four firetrucks and
two
ambulancesresponded to the scene wherethe
fire
was contained to the oneroom.
'The
initial quick action of(Share) saved the
day,"
Ken
&
Sidun, chief of Mercyhurst Police
\
and Safety, said. "He beganevacuating the building and wasassisted by the quick response ofother security personnel. The firedepartment worked fast toextinguish the fire which reducedthe amount of damage.*'According
to
fire
departmentofficials, when the fire ignited, itburned plastic and syntheticmaterials which created themajority of the
smoke
damage inthe dormitory.Twenty students were in EganHall on
Friday
night when
the
fire
ignited, Moore
said.
After thesituation was suppressed, 10residents of Egan aided in theinitial
clean-up
efforts, pitching inearly Saturday to box the clothesand
personal
effects of students
who
were
away or home for theweekend.
JhcrestorationofggaiyHall 'J
was headed by Bill Kerbusch,
*
director of the physical plant,Todd Landis, Jim Lawrence andJoe Brown, who worked theweekend alternating
10-,
12-
and
14-
hour shifts.
^*Three
professional
cleaning
companies were hired to restorethe floor. The ceilings andhallways of
the
entire floor havebeen painted, carpets cleaned, andstudents' clothes have been dry-
cleaned.
Each room was ozonedto rid the air of smoke:!
\
Residents of
the
third floorlived at the Holiday Inn indowntown Erie for four days.
Moore
said that second floorresidents chose to find alterna-tive housing on
campus
Fridaynight, but returned to their
rooms
Saturday. Residents from thethird floor returned Tuesday."We made certain that thestudents were accommodatedwhile staying at
the
HolidayInn,**
Moore
said.
"Vans
werescheduled to bring students backand forth
to
campus
for classesand extracurricular events."According to Sidun, the threatof
fire
on
a college
campus
is anemanating problem.
Two
years
ago,
a
candle
burning in BaldwinHalt started a
 fire.
 Candles
and
3,
open
 flames
 are not permitted in
dorms
and apartments, as is
*
stated in the student handbook.Sidun said police and safety
officers
have
also
responded totwo
 fire
 calls
this
year
when
foodwas left unattended on a hot
stoves
f
;"Students
need to
be
carefulof
these
dangers/
he
said.Sidun
also
stressed theimportance of not overloadingextension cords and outlets. At ameeting with the fire departmentand administrators of
the
college,the
 fire
 department emphasized
the
need for safety
checks
toensure that outlets are
not
overloaded causing a potentialthreat
Officer RoyceSmith,Mercyhurst Police
and
Safety, examinesthe fire scene in Egan
56. The
cause of
the
fire is still unknown.
Mercyhurst rids threat of Y2K Millennium Bug
By Carrie TappeMerciad editor
Y2K,
perhaps one of
the
mosttalked about mysteries of thenext millennium, is a problemsolved at MercyhurstY2K, also known as theMillennium Bug, results fromthe way many computers andprograms store and processdates.
Com
puters process datesby the last two digits of the
year.
The year
1999
would
s
appear
as
99 in most databasesThe format worked until [
E
computers were given dates inthe year 2000, or
00.
A com-puter that is not
Y2K
compat-ible would read this as1900.8Many people fear that onDecember
31,1999
at
midnigh
the computer systems of theworld will reset for the
yearSe
1900,peoplmoney in the bank, students'
grades
will
be
erased,
and utilitycompanies will
shut
down. Butdetection of the problem andplanning
has
taken
care
of
the
situation.Reports
by
college
administra-tors addressed
the
Y2K
compli-
ance
and academic computing
progress
at Mercyhurst BarryNuhfer, director of
the
computercenter, said that the college owns
636 PCs,
which are being testedfor 2000-compliance. Thecomputers found to not
be
compliant can
be
fixed with aTF2000 software program whichtargets the
Y2K problem
between
the
hardware level and theoperating system.
"The
computers in the com-puter
labs
and 75
percent of the
r*rfttnraiterc
on
cam nils
have been
_^.
Nuhfersaid."We, at
Mercyhurst,
are Y2K
compliant,**
Kathleen Noce,assistant to the president fortechnology,
said.
M
Most of
our «
computers are newer, so
they
came Y2K ready. The software*:that administration uses is alsoY2K compatible.*'According to Noce, comput-ers purchased
after
1997
weremanufactured
to
deal
withthe,Millennium Bug.
~-"
"What
we
need
to do
now istalk
to our
venders, such as the
electric
company,
to
ensure theyare
prepared,"
Noce
said.
"Oursecurity system installers,alarms,
phone
companies andother
companies
that provideservices
to the
college need toprovide us
with
a statementsavins that they are prepared andhave tested to
be Y2K
compat-ible."
I
Sister Mary Mark
Doubet,
director of
research
and informa-tion systems, said that
the
college
phone
system
is
2000-compliant
The voice messaging and call-
accounung
system whichregisters long-distance
calls
werenot previously compliant, buthave since been upgraded andtested
to Toe
compliant
'
Noce also stressed that
f
students and faculty should checkto
make
sure that their personalcomputers
are Y2K
compatible."I have ordered free
softwarethat
is
made available
to
educa-tional
institutions
that testscomputers for
this
problem.Assoon as
I
receive the software, itwill be
made
available on thecollege's intranet
to
download,"Noce said.According to Noce, you can
go
online
to the
computercompany's
Web
site
and
find
additional information
on the
Y2K
problem with
your
indi-vidual computer.
"E-mail
the
company
and
findout what
you
should
do
with
yourcomputer f
It
is not
compatible,"
she
added.
Macintosh computers have
always been
Y2K ready. Comput-ers with
a 486 or 386
Pentium
Processor chip, software
that only
tuna
on DOS
or
old versions
of,
Windows programs are suscep-
tible to the Y2K
Bug
"If
soft-
ware
is
no longer
supported,
moatlikelyIt
is
notcompatible,*'Nocesaid.
\
"Everyone should
check their i
computers
so
that they don't
run
into problems"
Noce
said.
"Thebest
way
to
be
safe, is to
be
sure.**
 
PAGE
2
THE
MEROADAPR1L 29.1999
CAMPU
S
NEWS
WHATS
HAPPENING...
Week
Friday,
April
30:
Hollywood Squares, 7:30 p.m., Taylor Little TheatreSaturday, May
1:
Extreme Air, noon
to
6 p.m., behind Baldwin
Hall £
Tuesday,
May 4:
SAC meeting,
8:30
p.
m.,
Student Government
Chambers
Wednesday, May
5:
Coffeehouse,
"The
Graduates," 9 p.m.,
Laker
Inn
3
Spring Formal
Tickets
are
on sale for the Spring Formal for
$15.
They can be purchasedin the union through May 6. The formal will be Friday, May 7,at Sabella's Union Station
and
will include a buffet dinner.
The
theme
i-
is a Hawaiian
luau.
White Water Rafting Trip
Saturday
and
Sunday, May
1-2,
there
will be a rafting
trip to
the
Youghiogheny River. The
trip
is for beginners
and
experienced rafters.Anyone interested can sign
up at
the union front
desk.
Party
In The
Park III
Circle
K
will sponsor a campus-wide picnic
and
festival Friday, May 14,from
1
to
4 p.m. in Garvey
Park.
Donations
of
$1
will be collected forfood. Hamburgers, hot dogs, lemonade
and
soda will be available. Glosswill perform and prizes will be given.
Pre-Major Fair Tuesday
The spring Pre-Major
Fair
will be
held
Tuesday
at
7:30
p.m. in
theGreat Room of
Herrmann
StudentUnion. The fair
is
designed forstudents to explore
possible majors
and career options.The fair
is
a
great
chance forstudents who haven't made
a
choicefor
a
major
yet, or
students
whohave made a choice
but
aren't sure
ifthey made the
 right
 one,"
Cathy^Anderson, dean of
student
develop-ment, said.
"Students should
explore
their
options."Representatives from variousdivisions of
the
college will beavailable
to
discuss possible careeroptions. The
Strong-Campbell
Interest
Inventory Test
will beavailable for
students
to determinewhat
major might
be mostcompat-ible with
their
personal interests.
Career
Services will
demonstrate
the
SIGI
program, a computerized
Introducing the edge
youjieed
for college
tie
essentials traditional financial
aid
won't
cover,
get the
AcademkEdge"-Loan
Easy to apply. Make no payments in schooL Flexible repayment after you
gradu
8
I Academicsdger
HF.
*
THE TOTAL EOvCATIOHLOAft
477-310XM56 for more information. Mip^AeadomicEeflo.ClirtaFinaiictal
eiOQQ ChcU
Financial
career exploration package. Doorprizes will be given and food andbeverages will be available.
Students
should!
explore theiroptions.
-Cathy
Anderson,dean
of
student development
"We did
it
in
October
and
it was agreat success. The faculty enjoyed ita
lot
and
students
seemed to respondwell," Anderson said. "We're going
to do
one every fall
and
spring."The
fair
is
sponsored
through
theStudent Development Department.Academic Support
and
CareerServices are the major supporters for
the
fair. Anderson encourages allstudents to attend.
Police andSafety Crime
Log
]
April
20
Careless DrivingEast Main Drive
^
A student was cited for
a
secondviolation for speeding
and
drivingcarelessly through campus. He wasreferred to judicial review fordisposition.
April 21 HarassmentEgan HallA female student received numerous
phone
calls
and
e-mails
from
a
former
boyfriend
who
attends
anout-of-town college. Most of
the
contacts were threats.April
21
Weapons Violation
Brlggg Avenue
ApartmentA claim was brought
to
the
attention
of
police
and
safety officers that
a
student
had a
firearm
in his
apart-'ment. The apartment
was
searched.A semi-automatic handgun wasconfiscated.
The
student
has
beensuspended from the college. Aninvestigation will continue.
Merciad
gets*
upgrade
I I The
Merciad has upgraded
its *lequipracnt
and facilities•
promising
N
to take the Mercyhurst
student
newspaper into the next millennium.The newspaper
in
March leasedsix iMac computers and a G-3 mini-tower plus other new equipmentgiving
students
an
opportunity towork with the most up-to-datecomputer systems and software.The Merciad's offices, located inthe former curriculum
library
on thethird floor of
Old
Main, wererevamped with carpeting by Joe
B's
Carpet
Connection
and
professionaloffice furniture.
Merciad
editorstackled painting the two rooms.
"These
improvements werenecessary to
bring
The
Merciad upto the level it should
be,"
said MaryDaly, vice president of
com m unci at
ions
and
adviser forMerciad operations.
"We've
already
1
seen progress in the
quality
of
the
paper, and
I
am confident that wewill continue to see the Merciaddevelop
as
a student publication."According
to The
Merciad's';editorial board, the upgrades haveI^
been
a
noticable
and welcomeimprovement.
"It
was a lot of work to get this
c»»
> *1
space.intp.shape,"Steve
Nolan,sportseditor, said.
'It'smuch
moreprofessional."Veteran Merciad staff member
Carrie
Tappe, news editor,
said
theimprovements
are
part
of
a
naturalprogression for the paper.
"I've
been involved
with
the
Merciad for
the
past three
years,"Tappe said.
"Each
year, there
are
tremendous improvements. Tocontinue improving, we
need
thehelp and support of
writers
for nextyear."Students interested in joining TheMerciad staff next
year
are
encour-^1
aged to apply now. All editorpositions
are
open
and
earn
scholar-ship monies. Writers, photographersand graphic designers
are
also
beingsought for next year's
staff.
Anyoneinterested should contact DanielleMurphy, Merciad adviser, at Ext.
3315
or
in 200B Old Main;
or
call
The Merciad at Ext. 2376.The Merciad is hosting
an
openhouse
and
reception Tuesday
at
7
p.
m.
to showcase the new
office
and
equipment.
"We*re
proud of
our
new
workspace."
Jessi
Gentile, editor in
chief,
said. "We want to inviteeveryone to come see it."
National Weather
Service
Weekend Forecast:
partly cloudy partly cloudy
Low
41
High
64Low 45
Low
45
 
APRIL
29.1999THEMERCIADPAGE
3
ARTS&
ENTERTAINMENT
The Ellington experience
Hop aboard asMercyhursttakes the A-train throughthe memorablemusic of theBig BandEra
The physical resemblance isremarkable, linking the threegenerations of
Ellingtons
withoutquestion.But
it's
the musical gap that willbe
bridged
at
the Mary
D'AngeloPerforming Arts Center Thursdaywhen Paul Mercer Ellington,grandson of
The
Duke,
leads
The^Duke Ellington Orchestra in
a
jazzmusic concert celebrating theoriginal Ellington's 100th birthday.The conceit will take concertgoers on a journey through themusic of the Big Band Era
SAC profile
£•
presented by the most celebratedjazz orchestra in the
country.
Nextstop on the musical train,
'The
Ellington
Experience."
,
\
Paul Mercer
Ellington,
the son ofMercer Ellington and grandson
of
Edward Kennedy
'The
Duke"
Ellington,
is
the third generation
of
fe jazz
aficionados
to
seize
the
i
&3
conductor's baton.Paul Mercer Ellington has been a
music
student since he
was
ayoung child traveling with hisfather on
tour.
In his mid-teens hebegan to conduct, watchingvideotapes of
his
grandfather andother great
conductors,
and by
h
taking private lessons at The
Juilliard
School ofMusic.Soonafter
he
began to conduct TheDuke Ellington Orchestra
from:
time to
time.
V*
At
the time I
started conductingI was just having fun," saidEllington in a press release.
"I
didn't realize that my fatherprobably
knew he
was preparing
me
to take over
the
band I justloved the music and the band. To
~me that's
all it was
funP'jp*Since the 1920s, the musicalworkings of Duke Ellington havebecome legendary, spending over
50 years
at
the
forefront of azz.
J
Having composed over
5,000
'
songs helps support the fact that
.
The
Duke has been
called
"America*
s Greatest Musical .
Composer.";,.
,,.
Upon Duke's
death,
his son,Mercer Ellington, took over the
orchestra^
He was
very much like
his
father.
He
had his
father's
eyefor
talent,
quick
wit
and musicalprowess. Venturing out
on
hisown, Mercer Ellington was
,(
successful as a writer, arranger,producer
and
musical director.Passing the baton
to his sc
Mercer Ellington in
1996 w
_passed away, Mercer Ellingtonmade good on
his promise
to hisfather
to keep the
band
working.
'1
knew since Paul's birth that he
was
the one
who
would followme," Mercer Ellington
once
stated.
After years
of
working beside
hisfather, at last it
was time
for PaulMercer Ellington
to take the
stage,
as
conductor of The DukeEllington
Orchestra.
Now
21,
Paul Mercer Ellington
has
arrived on a very importantyear of touting
to celebrate
the100th birthday of his
grandfathered
So join in
the toe
apping
anci>*!*Sjfinger
snapping Thursday
at
8 p.m.in thePAC.Tickets are
$15 forjadults and
$12.50 for
seniors and
students. For
more
information
oi
to order tickets call the
PAC
BoxOffice at 824-3000.
IF 1
V 5
File
photo
Paul Mercer Ellington,
grandson
of
the
legendary
Duke
Ellington,celebrates his
grandfather's 100th
birthday
with a jazz
concert inthe
PAC
Thursday at 8
p.m.
*
Heather Beckey, movie guru
Beauty
in the new
millennium
By Heather CvitkovicMerciad editorLast year
students
where treated
b)
the Student Activities Committeeto such movies as "Jerry Maguire"and
"Face/Off."
This year thosemovies are missing in action. Butdon't blame
Heather
Beckey,
senior English education majorand movie
chair.
Beckey isbattling high movie
price
tags andpoor attendance on some occa-sions.:The Performing Arts Center has
a 35
mm machine which the SACis not allowed to use unless we canguarantee attendance of 100people, which we cannot do," saidBeckey.
"The
35 mm machinecannot be
moved
This leaves the
16
mm machine which
has
to beoperated. So
we have to
paysomeone to operate it on
top
of thecost of buying the movie.
|
The problem is that bigger
*
movies cost more money. We,showed Titanic
1
at the beginningof the year
and
only about
five
people came and that movie cost
us
about
$800jBut
the problemwas that it was
so
huge that most
Heather Beckey
people
had seen
it
already
about
five times," she said.For all the costs associated withshowing recent films, Beckey saidstudent attendance
is
improving atSAC movies."I think that every year
has
itsups
and
downs. This year
has
beenpretty
good.
If
there's a problem,
it's
not just with movies, it's withdifferent things. It could
be
thatpeople just don't know about
the
events or just aren't interested.
"We do
this for our fellowstudents," Beckey added.
i
Beckey got involved in
SAC
herfreshman year and has been themovie chair
since
her unior year.
She
is a huge fan of movies, which
makes
her job pretty
easy.
This
isespecially important
since
Beckey
is
a graduating senior.This is
my
senior year springterm so
I
wanted to
do what I
wanted. We usually get a pretty
big
turnout
for 1980s
movies. TheGoonies' and
'Ferris B ueller's
DayOff were some of our biggerturnouts.
So I
wanted
to do
1980smovies for
the
final term,
movies
that people
dont
normally
rent,"
she said."Footloose" is the next movie,and
a
copy of
the movie will
be
given
away.
The
 final
 movie
of theyear
is "Space
Balls" for whichBeckey expects
a
pretty largeturnout because as she says,
"It's
Mel
Brooks
and everybody lovesMel Brooks.""Getting involved with
SAC
wasone of the best decisions I've
madeat this
school
It has led me
tobecome involved with otheractivities and introduced
me
to alot of people
I
would
not have
metotherwise," said Beckey.
Spotlight on
fashion
Heather Cvitkovic
As the
end of
the year and
the newmillennium approaches,
I
thoughtthat I would
take this time
to
i
address beauty
in the upcoming
century.
jfet
>Some people may
be
fretting
~!
about
the chaos
posed
by the Y2K
problem, and others worry about
the
political woes of
the
nation.
But there are countless
morewhose millennial concerns
lie far
closer
to
home. v
What really
makes
these
peopleanxious
is the
little
lump ofccllulite
they glimpsed in the fulllength mirror, the few extra strandsof hair they noticed in the showerdrain
or what new
color lipstickwill they invent to coordinate withall the new dyes that manufactur-ers are making for clothes.In the past
century,
for better orworse,
we have become
micro-managers of
every
aspect of
our
appearance, from
the tone
of
our
skin to
the shape
of oureyes,and
the cycle is
speeding
up
quickly.Every year
brings thousands of
new experts, potions and treat-ments that
promise to bring
ourbodies a
little
bit closer
to
thatelusive ideal.
1
*
%
Now,
as the
year
2000
rolls
around,
a
few
beauty experts
arepredicting a
backlash,
claimingthat women will actually becomeless obsessed with their looks.
But
for
every person
who is notconcerned with their looks thereare
a dozen others
eager
ID
seekout the
latest miracle
creams,
which are
getting
more
advanced^
by the minute and
which areappealing to ever younger
age
groups.
The
rapidly approachingmillennium
holds
many possibili-ties for
the
beauty conscious.
U
know
I
look
forward to the time
t
when cellulite
creams
actuallywork
and
wrinkle removers, well,remove wrinkles. Until then I willcontinue
my
quest for the perfectlymatching foundation and a
beautyregimen that takes
less than an
S
hour.
i..

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