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The Merciad, Nov. 3, 1999

The Merciad, Nov. 3, 1999

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Nov. 3, 1999
The Merciad, Nov. 3, 1999

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08/11/2014

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HH
r*M'i
*
i* 1
* i
1J
Vol 73 No.\t>
Mercyhurst College 501 E. 38th St.16546
ft
North East" retires debt
November
3,1999
Mercyhurst-North East
Mercyhurst will complete the
$
1.5 million purchase of
the
North Eastcampus
18
months ahead of schedule Friday, Nov.
5,
when collegepresident
Dr.
William
P.
Garvey presents a $484,000 check to theRev. Patrick Woods,
C.Ss.R.,
provincial vicar of the BaltimoreProvince of
Redemptorist
Fathers. The final payment in
the
purchaseof St
Mary's
Seminary, which the Redemptorists operated for
110
years, will be made at a special dinner at
Mercyhurst-North
East
'This
is a proud moment for North East and it would
not have
been possible without
the
strong support of
the
community,"saidGarvey. "Retiring this debt makes possible the development of
new
facilities, which will result in new debt But that is the nature ofthings as the campus progresses."Dr. Gary Brown, executive dean of Mercyhurst-North
East,
pointed out that
the
early debt retirement is
also
a statement of thecampus* healthy
enrollment
Approximately 457 students arepursuing associate degree programs at
the campus
and enrollment is
*»vnected
to
aDoroach
600 next year.
Career Fair:Thursday, 1 p.m. to 4 p.min the Athletic center
T
Long distance calling rates lowered
By Carrie Tappe
¥ f 1
Editor-in-ChiefEffective December 1, longdistance calling rates on campuswill be reduced. The current rateof
17 cents
per minute between 5p.m.
and
7
a.m.
will
be
reducedto
10 cents
a minute. Rates willdrop from
22
cents per
minute
to
16 cents
per minute for callsmade between
7
a.m. and
5
p.m.
"These
rates will make
it
telephone costs at Mercyhurstvery competitive, if
not
better,than
rates
charged at othercolleges or through calling cardsand phone cards,"
Tom
Billingsley, executive vicepresident ofadministration,said."The administration
hopes
thatstudents will be encouraged touse the college phone accesssystem more often,
thus'fcenerat-
i ng
enough re venue to keepfuture telephone charges down.";,
%"The
problem
was
drawn toour attention
by The
Merciad
staff,
and
we
agreed with themthat something needed to be
changed," Dr.
William P.Garvey, president,
said.
This*'was a good example of
how
student concerns are brought toour attention and addressed
|
before they become a majorissue."
4
In
1991,
the telephone systemwas purchased and installed for$574,000.
The college
adminis-ters the entire system, includingthe handling of
long
distancecharges and controlling thesoftware.
Computer
networklines were also run throughoutthe entire campus.According to Billingsley, the?,
college's
annual budget expensefor maintaining the telephonesystem is
$199381.
Thisincludes line and networkcharges, maintenance agreementswith GTE, equipment andcharges for
the college's
"800"number.
The
college also paid
$
12,829
to
complete a
Y2K
compliance upgrade."Because
the costs
of thetelephone system are substanti-ated,
we
needed
to
recover
the
expenses and opted
to make
thecost of
calls the
current
rates of22
and
17
cents pet minute ratherthan charge for installation
of
telephones, monthly servicecharges and local telephone
;
calls," Billingsley
said.
"Underthis rate structure, only students
who made long distance
calls
were
charged anything for
j
telephone service, and
the
collegewas able to generate about$150,000 to
$175,000
annually inrevenue
to help
offset expensesof
the
system."
"In today's
marketplace where
the
competition
is
intense for thetelephone business, students andparents felt
that the long
distance
rates were too
high, and theadministration saw a need forchange," Billingsley said.
>
How
do these rates
compare?At Gannon, students pay
10
centsper
minute
in the evenings and
16
cents
per minute during the
day. At Allegheny College,students can choose to
pay
a
$4.95
service
charge
per monthand receive long distance callsfor
10
cents per minute 24 hoursaday,or
with no
service fee,they
can choose 15 cents
per
minute all
day
or 20
cents per
ji
minute from
8
a.m.
to
6 p.m., and
1 0
cents per minute from 6 p.m.to 8 a.m.
p
According to Sister
Mary
Mark
Doubet,
director
of
Information systems, by havingMercyhurst
handle
its ownbilling and servicing
of
the
system, the third party fees areeliminated, and students
have
a
more
direct link to
the source if
there
are
billing problems.
"With
our system,
we
havevery
little
fraud where peopledeliberately
use
another person* s
telephone access
code," Doubetsaid. "If
this
happens, studentsshould bring
me
their
bill
and itwill
be
adjusted." ?.
Students should receive a
memo
regarding
the rate
changeswith their grades from fall term,Billingsley said.
Open house could benefit
your
health
Moving from Preston Hall toParade
Street,
Cohen StudentHealth Center
has
been able toexpand its facilities to better 1accommodate the growingnumber of
students
at Mercy-hurst. The entire college commu-nity is invited
to an
open houseat the health center Thursday,Nov. 4, from
3
to
5
p.m.
"We
want people to cometour our facilities to make surepeople know where
we
are andwhat
we
offer," PatriciaKowalskiColvin,R.N., said.The health center offers avariety of
services
to students."Right now through mid-November
is
the optimal time forstudents to get
 flu
 shots," Dr.David Kruszewski, collegephysician, said.
'The
shotprotects you frominfluenza,
s
which can
be
an epidemic illnesslasting seven to
14
days. Each
year 20,000 people die from
influenza.
The side
effects fromthe shot
are
minute compared tothe actual illness."Anyone interested in schedul-ing a
 flu
 shot can make
anappointment by calling Ext.
2431.
According
to
Kruszewski,anyone can get the shot, includ-ing those
who are sick or
pregnant. People who are
?
diabetic or suffer from asthmaare also encouraged to get a flushot.
I
In addition, the health centeroffers free prescriptions forcommon illness includingbronchitis, upper respiratoryinfections, skin infections andurinary infections. Students canalso receive tine tests
or mantoux
tests for tuberculosis for studentteaching or internship require-ments.According toKruszewski,*
there
isn'
t
a demand for servicesinvolving testing for pregnancyor
sexually
transmitted diseases.
If
people need services for
these
types of things,
we can
routethem to
the
appropriate commu-nity agencies. Being a privatecollege,
we do
not
have
the
money
or resources to fund theseservices,
but they
can
be
madeavailable."
"We are here for the
stu-dents,"
Colvin
said.
"I hope theywill take advantage of
the
openhouse and check
us
out"
frhe
health center
is
staffed byfour part-time nurses,Kruszewski, and a receptionist.
-
—1_-
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PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD
NOVEMBER
3,1999
CAMPUS NEWS
Pre-Med student completes AIDS research in South Africa
By
Jen Harwell
News editorWhile many students took thissummer
to
complete, summerinternships or worked
in
multiplejobs to earn money for school,Clyde
Collins
went to South
Africa
to
do
research.Collins, a junior
in
the pre-
5
medical program, traveled withhis mother to various places inSouth Africa for
two
weeks.While there, he did researchabout AIDS in South Africa. Hecollected data from the librarycollections at
the
University ofSouth Africa and the RandAfrikaanse University.
|5
Two hospitals were on hisitinerary for
the
visit, but
he
didnot get to observe both as he hadhoped. One hospital was inJohannesburg, and
the
other wasthe largest hospital in SouthAfrica located in Swetoes. It wasthe hospital in Swetoes that washighly secured/
'It
was like a
prison,**
saidCollins."Security was
so
tight,we were not even allowed to getout of
our
car.
*
The reason for
the
tight*security is the high crime rate inSouth
Africa.
Collins explainedthat many people were in the
$
hospital due to wounds inflicted <by another
person. Then,
whenthe hospitalized person survives,the attacker often attempts towalk in and finish the
job.
When Collins first arrived atthe hospital, all
he
could do waslook
in
from the outside and seerooms with rows and rows ofhospital beds. His visit
to
the
hospital in Swetoes was not a:total loss, because he hadconnections to a doctor inside
who
helped him get the informa-tion he needed for his research.Collins also had the
opportu-*
nity
to attend a
"Women
and theLaw'* conference and heardabout the rape of South Africanwomen and the transmission of
the
AIDS
virus. sS£'
J
"A lot of women get raped andthere are many cases of childmolestation, all of
which
helps topass along the AIDS virus,'* saidCollins.Another factor that couldcontribute to
the
AIDS
problemis the
way
used needles arehandled. Collins explained thatinstead of
throwing
away theneedles in the hospital, they arecleaned, sterilized and usedagain.
5
While on histrip,
Collins
didmanage to see some sights aswell.
One
of
the
most memorablefor
him was
a wild game reserve.Animals walk freely in a
park,
while
guests
drive through andremain inside the safety of
their
car
as
they observe them."It was so cool to
see
a
i
Cheetah just laying there,"
said
Collins chuckling.
'The
animalswere
so
close to
the
car and out
Notice to Dean's List Students:If you were not able to attend the Dean's
list
dinner on Oct
24,
you may pick upyour certificate in the Dean's office untilNov.
IS,
1999-
I
Eventson campus:
Wednesday, 11/3/99:
g
Coffeehouse: Musician:
Jamie
Notarthomas,
9-11
p.m.Weekends Committee Meeting
in
the
SAC at
8
p.m.
Thursday, 11/4/99:
Pool Tourney at Andy's
Pub.
Sign up in the
union.
Buses leave at6:45 p.m.
Friday, 11/5/99:
i
1 .
"Rocky
Horror Picture
Show"
at
8 p.m.
in the student union GreatRoom. Prizes awarded for those in costume!
Saturday, 11/6/99:
i
Turkey Bowling
"Thanksgiving
Dinner on a Roll."Meet in the union at
6
p.m.
Monday,11/8/99:,
Tournaments Committee Meeting in the SAC office at
8
p
m.
Tuesday, U/9/99:
*
Movie*
"Analyze
This" In the student
union
Great
Room
at
9
p.m.Movie Committee Meeting at 8:45 p.m. in the student governmentWinter Formal planning meeting at
9 p.m.
in
the MSG
chambers.
University of
South
Africa faculty
and
Clyde Collins
in the open."Another highlight of
his
tripoccured when Collins witnesseda presidential election. Becauseit
was
only the second timeSouth Africans
were
allowed toparticipate in
the
democraticprocess, the excitement wasoverwhelming. South Africanswalked
miles
and stood
in
longlines
for hours past midnight to
Recovery open forthose who need totalk, want to listen
Spiritual recovery for childrenof alcoholics is rarely a smooth,gracefully assured process. Itbrings us face to face withsickening circumstances. Whilecontending with them and withtheir effects
on
us as children,
these
attitudes, prohibitive
in
thepast, may be the most
disorient*
ing ones to experience today.Recovery may not
be
comfort-able or controllable but it is
yours
to
keep
and to
share. It isundeniably real, and you are
certainly
not
alone.Adult Children of MercyhurstCollege will be meeting on thesecond and fourth Wednesdaysof
each
month. Meetings will beheld
at
8:30
p.m.
in the confer-ence room in 102 Preston. Thesemeetings are not successive so
feel
free to join at any time.Anonymity is provided
and
what is seen and who is heard go
no
further than the meetingroom. If
you
have any questionsplease call Melissa Waclawik at824-2089.
i
cast
their
important vote. This isa big change from the attitudes ofAmericans.His mother
was
busy collectingdata of her
own
throughout thetrip.
She is
writing a
book
on
1African American Women in
prison.
Because of
her
research,Collins also got
to
tour
two
\J
different women's prisons. Hefound them to
be
very similar toprisons in the United StatesWhat upset Collins the
most*
throughout
his
trip
was the way
people
live
in South
Africa.
'}
The
things
you can
take
forgranted over here,
you
can't
over
there," said Collins.
'There's
somuch
crime
and
poverty.
Peoplelive in a shack the
size
of
a
house
that
they
built";'
\
]Collins estimated that around
70
percent of
the
population areunemployed,
which also leads
tohigher
crime
rates.Now all
Collins
has to do
isfinish his research paper that
he
fwill
present to
Dr
Larry
W
Gauri 1 of
in
order
to get
credi
tfor
all the
hard work he put
in
J
over
those
two
weeks.
As
for thefuture, Collins hopes that
he
willsomeday
be
able to return toSouth
Africa,
and is talking with
his
mother
about
returning in the
next
few years.
|
"South Africa
was
beautiful,"said Collins.
'The
scenery 1looked like a backdrop
to
amovie; or
like
something right
out
of
a
painting."
Student Forum:Thursday, 8 p.m. in
the
Mercy Heritage Room
Millennium Ball: Friday,
Dec.
10 at
Sabella'sjUnion
Station.
PATTI
PIZZA
3707 Pine Ave.
456-2270T
Open 7
days
j
Mon.
-Thurs
Jl
1
a.m.
-^midnight
Fri & Sat. 11 a.m.
-1
a.mjSunday
11
a.
m.-midnight
Hot
or|Cold
SubsPizzas
*
SaladsChicken WingsPizza Balls * Pepperoni Balls
 
%
m
NOVEMBER
3,1999
THEMERCIADPAGE
3
ARTS&
ErieBallet
jTheatre
Presents25th Anniversary Spectacular
By Charon HribarContributing writerThe Erie Ballet
Theater,
spon-sored by
Mercy
hurst College and
Lake Erie
Ballet,
will present itsfall concert this
coming
weekendat the Mary
D'Angelo
Perform-ing Arts Center.
Performances
will be held Saturday,
Nov.
6, at8
p.m.
and Sunday, Nov. 7, at2:30
p.m.
As the name implies,the 25th Anniversary Spectacularmarks 25 years of dance atMercy
hurst.
To commemoratethis anniversary celebration, theErie Ballet Theater
will
collabo-rate with the D'
Angelo
ConcertChoir, Chamber Orchestra
and jj
Percussion Ensemble for afabulous production.
The
castwill include over
50
dancers andwill be joined by internationallyacclaimed principal dancers,Gina and Jordi Ribera.The production will compriseof
six
distinct numbers per-formed by both
Mercyhurst
students and members of the
Lake
Erie Ballet, and will beaccompanied by members of
the
D* Angelo School of Music."Uncommon Dialogue"
is
amultimedia
piece
choreographedby a former Mercyhurst facultymember, Catherine Schaeffer.Another piece choreographed
by
Schaeffer
is
a contemporary solo,which will be performed to thewell-known
"Ave
Maria."
The
Riberas will dance thetraditional classical
"Pas
deDeux"
(dance
for two),
"Flower
Festival in Genzano."Another
solo
will be per-formed by
Erie's
prima
ballerina,
Christina Mariawho will recreate
the
dancemade famous by Anna
Pavlova,
'The
Dying Swan."
l\
Furthermore, the
Lake
ErieBallet Festival Dancers willperform "Vivaldi
%
a contem-porary neo-classical work.The show will conclude with
Marie
Schneider
4
s
"Mozart
Vespers."
This
is a colossalnumber brought to life by over
50
dancers.
i
Tickets are
$ 10
for adultsand
$8
for
seniors
citizens andstudents.
Movies for those "eerie"
By Ken FronczekA
&E
editor
So,
you are going out
to
themovies this weekend and do notknow what you want to
see.
I saystay home, rent a
movies
instead,it's much more comfortable,cheaper and enjoyable. Now you
don't
know what you want torent Well, seeing
as
how we arestill in the Halloween holiday,notice I said "holiday,"
I
have
afew suggestions for some scarymovies. Now, these are my ownpersonal selections, and like myprevious article,
"Best
beers for junder
$20,"
it is my ownopinion, so don't take it personal.I do
1 i
ke the
feedback,
but
I
am notout to force my views upon anyone.Here are some of
the
scarier moviesthat lay waiting on your
local
videostore shelves for you to take home,pop in the VCR and curl
up
on thecouch next
to
a cold one or
two,
towatch with your
hands
in front
of
your face.
For
a good scare, one that will
make
your significant other crawl
up
your arms, you
can't
avoid theoriginal "Alien," "Psycho," (for itstime), "Nightmare on Elm Street,"and "Halloween,"
as
well as"Halloween
II."
Some
would saythat "Friday the
13th"
belongs inthat list, it's entirely
a
judgement
cal
1. A recent release, "Mimic," is
nights
pretty creepy, as well as TheSilence of
the
Lambs" and"Freaks" (1933), which usedactual circus freaks and notspecial affects,
to
send a tingleup your spine."Scream"
is,
pretty good at making youjump, as well as
"The
Thing"with Kurt Russel (1980sversion) Now, for
those
of
you looking to lose
your
head,the "Exorcist" and TexasChainsaw Massacre," twoultimate classics, are my twofavorites for scary movies. Getthe
director's
cut,
they're bothmuch
more
demonic and un-cut, no pun intended!
'Hurst
to host musicTherapy presentation
Music therapist Ron Borczonwill explore the power of musicas a therapeutic tool during a
lecture/workshop
at Mercyhurst
Col
lege Friday, Nov. 5, from 6to 8
p.m.
His presentation,"Looking at the Power of Musicthrough a Different Perspec-tive " will also
inlude
video andaudio tapes of
actual
music therapysessions.
f
grant
5TtiDE|^T5 l
o%
opFpt^E55iof(5
fpi
 W[<
Your
TOTAL
Body Experience
2503 West
15*
street
T
Erie,
ffi
16505Ipoated betyfQd YorKtou^c Qajter8MN836-9779
K
QOip^
PEWWB
Office of
the
President,
Mercyhurst
JS^E
?*m
U//JWQ
I
WW
TUE5D/IY. flttJIQtylY
&
RID/^Y 9.00
- 8:00
U/ED|fE5D/)Y 1100
-
9:0035ffytlty>/lY
800 - 300
7* 5tyN6ty step
to
your suoaess"
art department and
D'Angelo
Sr*hnnl
of Music.
"Looki
Power ofMusic"
is
free and opento the public.
Borczon's
presenta-tion will take place in Zurn Hall,room 114.
ENTERTAINMENT
Newswatch 35 failsto prioritize
By Ken FronczekA
& E
editorFor some reason last Friday, Ifound myself sitting
in
front of
the
television watching the six o'clock
news
on Newswatch
35.
Back home
in Buffalo, I try tocatch at least some parts of thesix o' clock news, usually just tosee
the
weather
and
sports.However, in Erie, I
 find
hat it ismuch easier
and
satisfying
to
getthe
news
from
the
paper,
or
even
on the Internet
In
fact,
I
havenever once deliberately
sat
down
to
watch
the
news
onNewswatch
35,
or any
other
Erienews
TV
show,
because
of
the
poor quality that
was
deliveredthe
 first
ew times
I
stumbledacross it This past Friday
was *
the
shinning moment of the
station's
incompetence.With the recent death
of^^^
Payne Stewart, you would thinkthat every
small
city TV stationwould prioritize
his
story for itsimportance and
its
human touch,out of
pure
sympathy, if
not
anythingelse.But what didNewswatch
35
begin
its
sportssegment
with?
And what
does •
Newswatch
35
usually
do
with
big, important
stories?
They
place them
second-string
to
highschool athletics, primarilyfootball. I know that
Erie
is a
family-oriented
city withneighborhood
high
schools andtraditions, and
that
due to a lackof professional sports, high*school and college athletics mustsuffice for
sports
entertainment
But
placing
two,
city
football
games
ahead of
the
coverage
ofthe
sudden, tragic death of aprofessional athlete
was
ridicu-lous.What
is more
important
to
thestation managers, world-renowned Golfer PayneStewart's death,
or
a regularseason high school football
game?
Do
ratings and pleasing
the
audience take
precedenceover
human tragedy?
Usually
I
am
able to let something
like
this
go
away, but it
was
in such poor
taste
and
decision,
that I
had tosay something about it Newscoverage like
this does
not
helpthe image of a struggling
city g
like Erie.
Newswatch
35
failed
in its responsibility to itsviewers,
and,
to
me,
wasdisappointing.I think that Newswatch
35,
aswell as the other
news
stations inErie, should
take
a much closer,
more
careful look at their final
product,
and think about
their
priorities when it
comes
tochoosing their lead stories.
For
your
jeyes only
OntheDL
Ken FronczekCalling all closet cases! The newseason
premiere
of
the
X-Fileswas last Sunday. It
is
rumored to
be the
show's lastseason,so getyour trippy,
funky
alien grooveon
while
you can.There are quite a few intrigu-ing new movies
arriving
just
in
time for
the
holiday season. *TheLegend of SleepyHallow"
opens
soon, starring Johnny
Depp
and
my
number
one
lady friend,Christina Ricci. There
is
also
"Bone
Collector''
with
DenzelWashington, 'The Messengerthe Storv of Joan of Arc" withDustin Hoffman, "End of Days"
with
tough-guy
Arnold
Schwarzenegar, and
also
an
Oliver Stone
project,
"Any
Given Sunday."
Stone's
new
movie
is due
out closer toChristmas and stars
Al
Pacino,rapper
LL
Cool
J and CameronDiaz.The
news
on Elvis
is
thatboth
he,
and
close
pal
RonJeremy,
have
 finished
 shootingtheir latest
movie
in
Sweden andare
now
heading
to
Amsterdam
to
open
a
hash
bar.
Elvis andJeremy, both
kings
in their
own
right, have been working on
some
hydroponics which they
call Memphis
Twang. It
can
onl)
be found in Amsterdam cur-rently, but
this
author
is
working
on getting
some
sent to the
states.
«
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