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The Merciad, Feb. 16, 2000

The Merciad, Feb. 16, 2000

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The Merciad, Feb. 16, 2000
The Merciad, Feb. 16, 2000

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<s>
MERCYHURST COLLEGEHAMMERMILL UBRARY
ERIE,
PA.
16546-0001
f ertioDICAL
LIBRARY USE ONLY
Vol
73 No. 13
16546
:ooo
Activist debates U.S.-funded training of Latin American soldiers
MUlotrnlinn••«
•• • •
^
n
i
i
*
l^h-—^
i2 '*
**m^
By Dave
Hermenau
Features editorBefore a packed Mercy HeritageRoom Feb. 8, the
Rev.
RoyBourgeois lectured on socialjustice in Latin America andlater received the Oscar RomeroAward for his dedication to thecause. Bourgeois is founder
and
co-director
of
the
School ofAmericas Watch.The standing-room-onlycrowd consisted of bothfollowers and critics of Bour-geois* cause. The School of
the
Americas is a U.S.-fundedinstitution that
trains
LatinAmerican military members,many of whom have committednumerous human rights atroci-ties. The school's graduates
\
include the likes of ManuelNoriega^ ex-dictator of Panamaand Salvador death squad leaderRoberto
D'Ambuisson.
The
gripe
of Bourgeois andhis followers is that
die
poor
of
Latin America
are
beingoppressed, murdered and rapedby dictators and soldiers trainedin America by
U.S.
tax dollars.The school's graduates, theyargue,
contribute
to making asmall elite group
 richer
 while f
the poor get
poorer.
^M
I
I
I
"It's a war against the
poor,"
Bourgeois said prior to the I 1presentation.Bourgeois traces the
U.S.
allotment to the school,which he claims is close to $20million a year, to
our
nation'smultinational interests.
"It's
all
*
connected,"
he said, "to aneconomic system in the develop-ing world, and around the world,that really keeps a small elite veryvery wealthy and the vast
f
majority very poor."Bourgeois first learned of
the
|
SOA upon the murder of humanrights leader
Archbishop
OscarRomero in
H Sai
vador by SOAgraduates. Nationwide mediacoverage of the SOA came inNovember
1989
when six Jesuitpriests, a young mother and herdaughter where killed in themiddle of
the
night at a universityin
El
Salvador by graduates of
the
school.
*'' Bourgeoisjbunded
SOAWatch in
1990
and set up shop ina small apartment outside thegates of the school in FortBenning, Ga.
' "We
started with
10
of
us,
10years ago," said Bourgeois, "notknowing really what we weregoing to uncover. What weuncovered
was
a school ofassassins in our backyard."
I
Not all agree with Bourgeoisand his followers."Have you ever protestedagainst Harvard?" a student asked
r
i
Gerrlt
Shuffstall/Merclad
photographer
Dr. Joseph Qower presents
Rev.
Roy Bourgeois
with
theArchbishop Oscar Romero Award. Bourgeois is
the
founder ofthe School of AmericasWatch,
f ,
T *
during the lecture. The studentwent on
to
explain that
Uni
bomber Theodore
Kazinski
was
trained at Harvard Univer-sity and was responsible for thedeath of many people. Theargument that
the
SOA is notresponsible for
the
actions of
its
graduates
is
a common rebuttalagainst
the
movement
to
closethe school.Bourgeois,
who was
a naval
officer
for four
years
and earneda Purple Heart fighting in theVietnam War,
has
certainly beenon both sides of
the
fence
" I
himself.
Imprisoned many timesfor
his
activism, Bourgeoisrealizes that
he has
opponents,yet is still grateful for a set of
^open
ears.
He
believes that theSOA is valuable for anyone tostudy."I
t's
a teaching moment
in
asense; we can look at the schoolof
the
Americas and
we
can learnabout our foreign policy," saidBourgeois.
$
For
his
work in educatingpeople about injustice in Latin 1
America
and his dedication tohuman
 rights,
 Mercy
hurst'sdepartment of philosophy andreligious studies gave
its
annual
Oscar
Romero
award to
Bour-
geois.-^* -
'
'f'
~f
r*
"The
award recognizes anindividual or group that promotesthe college
1
s tradition of Catholicsocial teaching," Gower said.
Despite
the
controversysurrounding the
SOA,
it
is
clearthat
Mercyhurst,
with its Arch-bishop
Oscar Romero
Award,
1was honoring
a
man not for hispolitical affiliations or beliefs butfor his dedication
to the
under-privileged of
Latin
America andfor
his
efforts injustice and human rights.
I
Gerrit
Shuttstall/Merciad
photog
Shawn Basile and KateCywinski pucker up for theSmooch-a-thon
Saturday
Iat the
Millcreek
Mall.
I I
Smooching scholars tryto
kissftheir
way to Paris
Kissing your loved one took on awhole new meaning Saturday asthree Mercyhurst studentsremained lip locked with theirlover for
10
hours and 38
minutes
as part of Star
104's
"Smooch-a-thon 2000" at
the
Mi llcreek
Mall.To qualify for the event, thecontestants had to be caller 14after hearing the infamoussmooching sound on STAR.
t
I
Couples Kate Cywinski andShawn Basile, and Diana
Gettinger
and Jason Fidorabattled with 27 other couples foran
all-expense-paid
trip to Paris,France. The contest began at 10a.m. By 6
p.m.,
only 9 couplesremained. To make the contestharder, the contestants were nolonger allowed to embrace. By 7p.m., they had
to
hold
theirhands behind their backs, and at8
p.m.
they were
no longer
allowed
to move.How do you prepare to kissfor over
10
hours?
"We
didn'
t%
kiss for a week,"
Basile
said
"The
hardest part
was
standingthere for
so
long.
Around
thefourth or fifth hour,
my
neckand back were so sore."The
couples
were notallowed to take a break for anyreason without being disquali-fied. "I didn't eat or
drink
Friday
oi
Saturday so
I
wouldn'thave to go to the bathroom,"Basile commented.Call it
the
power of love,
call
itpassion
whatever
it
may be,only eight
couples made
it until8:45 p.m. when they were finallyallowed to stop kissing. The eightcouples
were
drawn randomly tochoose a French pastry, one ofwhich was filled with cream, todetermine the winners. Althoughthe Mercyhurst students did nothave the luck of
the
draw, overallit
was
a Valentine's experience toremember.
* "I
don't think it
was
really fairthat it
came
down
to
a pastry,"Basile said. "It
was
a fun experi-ence,
but I
don* t think I would doit again for a
couple
years."
Gerrlt Shuttstall/Merciad photographer
Diana Getti nger
and
Jason,
Fidora kissed
for
10 hours
and38 minutes
during
Star
104's
Fourth Annual Smooch-a-thon.
 
PAGE
2THEFEBRUARY
16,
2000
CAMPU
i
NEWS
r
Hurst
students help secondgraders become authors
Second-grade students atMcKinley Elementary Schoolcelebrated their achievements asnewly-published writers at theschool's second annual Author'sTea on Tuesday, Feb.
15,
at theMcKinley library. The youngauthors were joined by
the
34Mercyhurst College educationmajors they worked with duringthe six-week project as theypresented their
printed
books to
friends
and family members
during
the celebration.Dr. Kathleen Bukowski,assistant professor of educationat Mercyhurst, began the bookwriting project last year with a$9,000 Pennsylvania HigherEducation Initiative Grant fromthe state Department of Educa-tion. The project also includedthe
development
of a
writing
resource center for teachers andstudents in the McKinley schoollibrary. •
\
v
** \ -^
7*
"The Erie School District hasmade improving students'writing skills a top priority," saidBukowski, referring to thedistrict's leadership
project,
Schools Organizing to AchieveResults or
SOAR.
"This projectfit perfectly with that goal.Writing can be difficult andintimidating to some students,but this project walks themthrough the steps of storydevelopment, writing, revision,editing and publishing. At theend, they've learned the value
of
these steps and have a finishedproject to
show
for their
work.
"The students are so proud oftheir books, and the books givethem
confidence
in their
abi 1 i
tiesto
write,**
she continued.
.The
approximately 120second-grade students who tookpart in the project were dividedinto groups of
three
or four and
assigned
a Mercyhurst student
who
served as the group'steacher. Each group developed atheme for the books such assports, animals or favoriteactivities, and each student
was™
responsible for narrowing
his
orher topic, Bukowksi said."The Mercyhurst studentswere really the teachers in this
project/'
she
said.
'^They
*
instructed their
groups
oil the
*steps in writing and worked witheach student throughout theprocess."Bukowski and a new group ofMercyhurst education majorswill return to McKinley duringthe college's spring term to workwith third-grade students. Thewriting resource center willremain a permanent part
ofMcKinley's
library.
Events on campus: J
Wednesday
2/16/2000
Coffeehouse: 5 Cubic Feet,
9-11
p.m. in the Laker Inn.
Thursday
2/17/2000
g
"Mercyhurst
in Ireland," January
2001,
informational meeting forall interested sophomores
and
juniors, Main 208, at 8 p.m.Broom Hockey Tournament, 8 p.m. in the REC Center.Concert: Youngstown State University Jazz Ensemble, 7:30 p.m. inthe Performing
A its
Center.
v
Play: "Tintypes," 8p.m.in the Taylor
Little
Theatre.
Friday,
2/18/2000
Play: "Tintypes," 8 p.m. in the Taylor Little Theatre.
Saturday
2/19/2000
['drain
Bee,
1
p.m. in Zurn 214.
«
H
Play: "Tintypes," 8 p.m. in the Taylor Little Theatre.
Sunday
2/20/2000
The D'Angelo School of Music Wind Ensemble, 2:30 p.m. in theMary D'Angelo Performing Arts Center.Play: 'Tintypes," 2:30 p.m. in the Taylor Little Theatre.C.E.C. Finals study break, 7 p.m. on the third floor of Old Main.$.50 for study snacks or bring your
ov
n.
Monday
2/21/2000
4
£
Food
foi
finals, 8:30 p.m. in the student union.
\
f
X
•an
fr!
-.Wl
Over $2,600 has
been
raised toward a
$3,600 goal
for
the Class
of 2000 Senior
Class
Gift. Picturedis the
construction
site where a stone
and
brick patio
will soon
be built off
the
Laker
Inn
and overlook-
ing
the Grotto. The deadline for seniors to
make
their gifts is rapidly approaching. For more informa-tion or to pledge a gift, call Scott Koskoski at Ext
3211
or Steve
Zinram
at Ext 3023. **
1
GrantsitoiMercyhurst exceed! $1
million
in
1999
By Jen HarwellNews editor
;-
Several departments at ttjfMercyhurst College havereceived thousands of
dollars
ingrants and contracts enablingeach
to
cover the expenses ofprojects, research, travel andequipment that their budgetmight not have covered other-
wise.
For the
1999
calendar year,Mercyhurst received a total of
$
1,350,174
in
grants for variousprograms.
-
From that money $602,291went to the Mercyhurst CivicInstitute, $237,852 to the
Research/Intelligence
AnalystProgram, $216,000 to theArchaeology program, $191,019to the Education
Department}
and $58,570 to HRIM. Inaddition, $24,800
was
given tothe Chemistry Department
and
$19,642 to the Geology Depart-ment
\f
J,Robert
J.
Heibel, director
of
R/IAP, feels that
this
programhas been positively influencedby these
grants.
The funding hasallowed
R/IAP
to
hire two morepersonnel, pay the wages ofstudents not receiving work studyand those
who
use up their workstudy money,
equipment,
as wellas travel.
None
of
these
wouldhave been possible with theprogram's regular budgetallocation.
|
"Our goal is to keep thedepartment's momentum going,and this outside funding certainly
helps,"
said Heibel.
Jobopportunities looking
good
forHRIM students
By Jen HarwellNews editor
Mercyhurst*
s hotel restaurantmanagement program has hadgreat accomplishments in itssuccess with internships
and
jobplacements. One of
the
majoremployers that Mercyhurststudents have gone to aftergraduation is Hyatt.The hard work of
the HRIM
students, along with the
help
ofCareer Services, has promoted
Mercyhurst's
excellent reputa-tion among many potentialemployers.Recently, Hyatt gave one of
HAIR
*
NAILS
1SKINCAR6
IS MOVING
.
to
926
West 26th Street
(across
from
Arthur
t*.
Scfwltz
)
March 8,
2000
( date
tentative
)Please call
864-I277
to
confirm
our
location prior to
your
appointment
(
K>%
Studsnt
Dfeoount
on
Haircuts )
its biggest competitors the tipabout Mercyhurst students. John
Wolper,
director of HRIM, saidthat Hyatt told Hilton SalesWorldwide that the Mercyhurstprogram produced excellentSince then, Hilton has beeneager to recruit the graduates thatthey have been hearing so muchabout. Hilton is currently finish-ing up on a merger, but fullyexpects to
be
ready forMercyhurst students by next fall."It's great reinforcement forour program, but
more
impor-
tantly, it provides additionalopportunities for our graduates^said Wolper.
j|
IRobert Hvezda, director
of
career services, oversees the joband internship placement for allHRIM students. Recruitment forHRIM students for Hilton SalesWorldwide will begin for
the
veryfirst time this fall, 2000."The presence of Hilton SalesWorldwide on the MercyhurstCampus is a great compliment toJohn Wolper ad HRIM facultyand students," said Hveda.
„»»
 
FEBRUARY
16.2000TH E MERCI
AD
PAGE
3
ARTS&
——— ;
i
—itNTERTAINMENtT
Blddle
de Bop in
your
life
Americanjmusrcal
"Tintypes"
The Youngstown State University Jazz Ensembles
File photo
Looking
to put a little
Biddle
deBop in your life? The Young-stown State University JazzEnsembles have plenty to spareand will be sharing
i
t witheveryone Thursday, Feb.
17,
at7:30 p.m. in the Mary D'AngeloPerforming Arts Center.
-
The YSU Jazz Ensemble,with a straight-ahead big bandsound, will perform jazz staples
like "Willow
Weep for Me" andother works from greats likeThad Jones and Tommy Harrell.The group
will
be joined by jazzsaxophonist Bruce Johnstone.The
18-member
ensemble hasearned numerous awards,including
"Most
OutstandingBand" at the Wichita JazzEnsemble in
1976
and theCentral Ohio Jazz Festival in1980,
1982 and
J984. Theyhave performed at many jazzfestivals, including the NotreDame,
Cleveland,
and CentralNew York
Jazz
Festivals. Band
members
are both schoolfaculty and students.The ensemble, begun in1969, is under
the
direction ofTony
Leonardi,
director of JazzStudies at the Dana School ofMusic at Youngstown StateUniversity.
He
has played
professionally with
WoodyHerman, Stan
Hen
ton, BuddyRich and Chuck Mangione. Hewas named
"Jazz
Educator ofthe
Year"
in 1966 by the Ohiochapter of the National Associa-tion of Jazz Educators, andreceived the DistinguishedProfessor Award at YSU in
1991
e
"
Tickets are $8 for adults, $5for students.
Upcoming moviesat the PAC
The Mary D'Angelo Perform-ing Arts Center continues thisseason's
film
series with
"Buena
Vista SocialClub,"Wednesday, Feb. 16, at 8 p.m.This highly popular
film
presents the story of a group
of
legendary Cuban musicians,some as old as their 90s,brought together by Ry Cooderto record a CD. Come
earl
y forcoffee!•On Wednesday, Feb.
23,
at8 p.m., the PAC presents theIndian film,
"Earth."
Directedby
Deepa
Mehta, this filmdepicts the
1947
culture of thecity of Lahore, portraying thedeterioration of tolerancebetween close friends of differentreligions and the maddening
offreligious
zealots as the city ofLahore is decidedly given
to
thenewly
freed
Pakistan.•The PAC will continue itsspring film series with "Dancingat
Lughnasa"
on Wednesday,March 1,
at8
p.m.!The
story,told through the eyes of a youngboy, portrays
 five
 sisters
who
areforced to cope with the fatherlessboy and their older brother. Thesisters continue to function
as
aclose-knit unit, until
something,
happens that disrupts the veryfabric of
the cohesi
venessbeyond
repair,
?•On Wednesday, March
8,
at8 p.m. the
PAC will
show"Princess
Mononoke."
Thismovie tells the story of a princein search of a cure for
his
deadlydisease. During his journey, hecomes upon a war waged by theanimals of
the
forest against anexploiting mining town. Theanimals are lead by the humanPrincess Mononoke, who wasraised by wolves. Tickets are $3for each movie. Mercyhurststudents are free
with
ID.
1530?W.
26*}Street
No appointment needed!Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.mSunday
(9 ia.m
unday 9 a.m. -9 p.m.
tanning package to suit every
student
1 D.m
I
8visits;for
opens Thursday
If you
can't wait until July tocelebrate everything American,then all the makings of a July 4thcelebration are available six
*
months early in the nostalgic,patriotic musical revue,
Tin-
types." The
trip down
memorylane runs Thursday, Feb. 17,through Saturday,Feb.
19,
at 8p.m., and a Sunday matinee Feb.
|20
at 2:30. The show will be
h
performed in
the
Taylor LittleTheater."Tintypes"
is
a musicalpageant of
pre-World
War
I
America,
from the days ofragtime
up to
the birth ofvaudeville.
The show features
over
50 classic
American tunes,telling the story of Charlie, aRussian
immigrant,
who
hasdecided
to
dream the AmericanDream. Along the
way,
he meetsfive people
who
have definedtheir decade in American historv:Anna
Held,
the music hall
sensation;
the socialist, EmmaGoldman; Susannah, a domesticworker; and President TeddyRoosevelt.This is not the first time"Tintypes"
has
graced theMercyhurst stage. Director IgorStalsky
has
presented the showtwice before
to
 rave
eviews andcommunity accolades. Thisproduction features Mercyhurststudents: Jeremy Verdi, RayAllen Fritz, Tricia Six, JulieMason and Kristin Weeks.Musical director Louisa Jonasonprovides direction for songs suchas The Yankee Doodle Boy,"
|"America
the
Beautiful,**
"MeetMe in St Louis,"
"I'll
Take You
Home
Again,
Kathleen,""Bill %
Bailey, Won't You ComeHome," and
"You're
a Grand
Old Rag."
i
For tickets, call
Ext
3000.
Hurst presents "Y2Dance?"
By Charon HribarMerciad writerOn Thursday, Feb.
17,
the DanceDepartment
will
present"Y2Dance?" an in-studio perfor-
mance
with all-new, world-premiere choreography
by
dancemajors, and a guest appearancefrom the Lake Erie Ballet FestivalDancers.The production showcases awide variety of
dance
styles from
the dramatic
memorial presenta-tion of
the
Columbine HighSchool shooting,
"Lament
andRequiem," to the electrifying,upbeat techno number,
"Glowing
Paradise."The list of choreographersinclude Cindy Cannon, SylviaBlum, Brendon LaPier, KellyMarkos, Katie Mitchell andElizabeth Shelton."Y2Dance?" isa
show
that
features "a
little bitof
everything."
With the
greatdiversity of dance being pre-sented Thursday
evening,
therewill
be
something for everyone
to
enjoy.
*
M
Y2Dance?"
will
be held
in',
danceSpace,
Studio
A,
Thursdayat 8
p.
m. Admission to theperformance isfree.
of the Beholder
Just
the Ticket
Brandon Boylan
This movie
was
almost
as
bad as"Any Given
Sunday,"
but unlike"Sunday,"
the
editors of "Eye"knocked off
an
hour
and
a
half,
making us somewhat grateful.Ewan MacGregor and AshleyJudd are surely wasted in
this "I'mgoing.to
try to confuse you onpurpose" type of a movie. Juddplays a murdering woman wholashes out violently toward menbecause "daddy wasn't there forher while growing up." She isstalked, followed and eventuallysaved by
none
other than Obi-
Wan
himself,
Ewan
-Through
the
mix
of
it
all, they sort of
fall
in love and end up... well, I'll letyou watch it
u
The acting
was
 fine,
 exceptfor a few scenes delivered
by*
Judd.
who tries
her best to be a
"bad"
girl
but
can't
pull it
off.Ewan was good
as the
"savior,"
6
though
his
character
was
limited
to
only watching Judd through-out
the
whole movie (if you want
to call
that a limitation). Thescenes were almost non-existent,and the plot
was
much to bedesired. The only really goodthing about it was its shortenedlength
(1
hour
42
minutes). Igave
it a
3 out of 10.

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