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The Merciad, Feb. 7, 2001

The Merciad, Feb. 7, 2001

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The Merciad, Feb. 7, 2001
The Merciad, Feb. 7, 2001

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER
OF
MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929
•_,
ARTS&,
f
fej
Er^irmTAiNMENT
'
Hurst honors Burleigh dur-ing Black History Month.
page 3
Get tickets forthe big game.
page 3Vol. 74 No. 14
Mercyhurst
College
501
E. 38th
St.
Erie, Pa. 16546February 7, 2001
Mercyhurst goes green
Mercyhurst Green to conduct campus-wide study of environmental impact
By
Zack VenableMerciad writerIn the
spirit
of
this year's
Academic Celebra-tion,MercyhurstGreen,
the college's
environ-mental awareness
group,
will
be
conducting ascavenger
hunt to determine what
Mercyhurstis and is not doing in regard to the environ-ment. The scavenger hunt was an idea that
came
out of
the
"Greening the Campus" work-shop
held
fall term.Lisa
Danko,
biology lab supervisor/lecturer
and one
of
the organizers
of
the
event,
stresses
the importance
of
the
endeavor for
all who
par-
ticipate. "The purpose of
this
is to change theway we think on and off
the
campus. Ameri-cans are so used to consumption. We need
torealize
that
we
cannot continue
to
throw awayvaluable resources/ said Danko.Students
who
register for
the
scavenger
huntare to
form
teams
of
three
to
five
people. Theteams will then scour
campus,
collecting datathat deals with environmental issues.Things to be studied during the
scavenger
hunt include, but are not limited to, paper us-
age,
energy
consumption, recycling programs,carbon dioxide production and water usage.
The goal
of this project is
to collect as much
information as possible on the subject in or-der to present the findings
at .academic
cel-ebration.
^
Dr. Chris Magoc, assistant professor of
his-
tory and creator of
the
project, said that manyother colleges
and
universities have
done
simi-
lar studies. Penn State University has beenconducting one since
1998.
"There
are.sev-eral hundred schools around the country thathave gone 'green.' Many of
them
have
begun
their
work doing-a
campus-wide environmen-tal audit. Essentially, it acts as a baseline forenvironmental performance for the college,"explains Magoc.There is added incentive for those
who
par-ticipate in the scavenger hunt. First,
second
and third-place cash
prizes will
be awarded
to
those teams who produce the most thorough
reports
and give the best presentations.
Afterv
ward,
all
of
the
collected data
will be
includedin a publication.
"Students who
participate willbecome co-authors of this report. They will
be producing one
of
the
 five
 chapters
on
envi-ronmental assessment here at Mercyhurst,"says
Magoc.
JStudents can
use the scanenger
hunt as a
ser-
vice
learning
experience or receive honorscredits for
it.
The deadline
to
join the scaven-ger hunt is
Feb.7.
Students
are
encouraged tocontact
Lisa Danko as
soon
as
possible
at
ext.2373 for more information.
Zack Venable/Contributing photographer
Every year on
February
2,
the world waits
for
a
fuzzy little
animal in
Punxsutawney,Pa.
to predict
whether
or not there will be
six
more weeks of
winter
or rf spring is just
around the
cornerlUnfortunately,
Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow this
year,
asign that
there will
be six
more
weeks of
blustery,
cold winter
weather.
I -
MSG to hold town meetings
By
Sara SeidleMerciad writerMercyhurst Student Government has made afew changes in the schedule and format of
its
weekly meetings.
On the
first Monday of eachmonth, MSG will hold a New England townmeeting
;
n
place of
its
regular meeting. Mon-day, Feb. 5 marked the first time MSG heldsuch a meeting.One of
the
reasons for the change is to in-crease student involvement. "Our meetingshave always been open to students, but wewanted to open them up more, make
themmore
visible to students," said Tracy
Fischer,
MSG presidentThe New
England
town meetings will beheld
in
the Student
Union
Great Room instead
of he
MSG Chambers.
Thetc will be
a changein the regular agenda to allow students who
attend the meeting
ime
o
voice their concerns,questions and ideas to MSG as well.
"The
meeting will be open to
anyone
just walkingby,** said
Fischer*
The idea for the town meeting format wasproposed
by
senior representative
Perry Wood
and
sophomore
representative Kristen Brown.According
to
Wood,
the town meeting formatoriginated during
the
founding of the
coloniesin
America.Wood said, "The New England town meet-ing is
a
chance for the student government ofMercyhurst College to reach out to its base
and
communicate
more
effectively with them.The ability to share ideas in a
constitutional
order is imperative." The entire MSG bodyvoted on the proposal, officially amending itsconstitution to include the new format."The New England town meeting should bean experiment in student involvement,**
said
Wood. He added that the new format shouldproduce in the students a feeling of
duty
andobligation to the college.In the
months
that MSG holds a student
fo-
rum, there will not be a New England
town
meeting. According
to
Wood,
"The New En-gland town meeting should function to bol-ster constituency and student
forums,
not
re-
place them.** The next New England
town
meeting will be held Monday, March 5.
'Insomniac' to air spring term
By Sara SeidleMerciad writerHurst TVs
"Hurst
Rock," a talk showproduced, directed and cast by Mercyhurststudents, will be losing one of
its
hostsspring term.Junior Jeremy Verdi, co-host of
the
showalong with Sarah Foster,
who
is also ajunior, will no longer be able to
 fill
heposition due
to
prior commitments. Verdi isa member of Mercyhurst's cross
country
team which competes during spring term. "Ilove Hurst Rock, but I'm on scholarship forcross country. It is my
 first
 priority," saidVerdi. i
j . '
Verdi will continue his involvement withHurst Rock" as executive producer, but isnot able to be present when the show airsfrom 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays throughThursdays."I don't know who my replacement will
be.
We
are starting to look for someone
now
Anyone who is interested should contact
it
Sarah Foster," said Verdi.Because he will no longer be able to host"Hurst Rock," Verdi is starting his ownshow scheduled to air at a later time thatbetter fits his schedule. The new show willbe entitled "Insomniac." Tentatively, theshow will be airing two nights a week,Tuesdays and Thursdays, from
11:30
p.m. tomidnight.According to Verdi, the show will follow alate night format similar to that of NBC'sConan
O'Brien
and CBS's The Late Showwith David Letterman.
He
said it willcombine aspects from shows like SaturdayNight
Live,
The Daily Show and The ManShow, both on Comedy Central, and alsocontain a segment similar to Jay Leno's"Jay-walking".
,
Verdi said he will possibly have a sidekickto host the show along with him as well as alive
band.
There will also be a new set.Verdi said that anyone interested in being apart of
the
show, either on the air or behindthe scenes, should contact him at
ext.
3161.
 
PAGE
2
THE MERCIAD
FEBRUARY 7. 2001
CAMPUS
NEWS
Eriej County Council to decidesexual orientationissue
By Ellen LearnMerciad writerThe Erie County Human Relations Commis-sion met recently and unanimously passed
a
resolution to include
"sexual
orientation"
as a
protected category in the
anti-discrimination
ordinance in Erie County.Mercyhurst
student,
Tim McNichol, said
"It's
a very positive move.
It
would be reallygreat to have sexual orientation included inthe
ordinance
just in case a problem did oc-cur.
It also brings
awareness." McNichol wasinvolved in
Mercyhurst's
Gay-Straight Alli-ance last year.The current Erie County Human
Relations
Commission anti-discrimination ordinanceprovides protection against discrimination inemployment, housing and public accommo-dations, such
as
restuarants
and
hotels for cat-egories ofrace,national origin, religion, sex,age and
disability.
It does
not include the
cat-
egory of
"sexual
orientation."
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Harrisburg,Lancaster and
York all include sexual
orienta-tion in theirordinance.According
to Michael
K. Mahler of the Erie Gay News, Erie is thelargest city in Pennsylvania that does not in-
elude "sexual
orientation"
in its
anti-discrimi-nation ordinance."The absence of
sexual
orientation as a pro-tected group is not good law ... and this im-portant legal change needs to be made," saidHRC President William McCarthy. 1Approximatly
70
people attended the meet-ing. Some individuals that made
statements
supporting
the
addition of "sexual
orientation"
included^Dr.
Bob Cogan, a representative of
the NW
PA chapter of
the American Civil
Lib-
erties
Union,
Dorothy Stoner, OSB, a visitinginstructor of religious studies at
Mercyhurst
College,
and.Mary Louise
St. John, OSB,Maureen
Koseff,
president of the Erie/Crawford chapter of Parents,
Friends and
Fam-
ily
of Lesbians and Gays and HeatherMalobisky, co-editor of
Pride
News. Severalmembers of
the the
community also attended.In the
York,
P.a. ordinance "sexual orienta-tion"
is
defined
asl'male or
female heterosexu-ality, homosexuality, bisexuality, or any othergender identity practice
as
perceived by oth-ers." This means that all sexual orientationsare protected; gay, straight and bisexual, notonly homosexuality.It is up to Erie County Council to decidewhether or not "sexual orientation" will beincluded in
Erie's
ordinance.
The council
andits solicitor will view the proposed changesand vote on the amendment some time in up-coming weeks.
Mercyhurst PoliceandSafetyLog
Jan. 26, 2001McAuley
Hall
Feb.
3,2001
3830 BriggsToilet paper dispenser was
fLarge party'where
alcoholwritten on. was being
served^to
minorsJan.
28,2001
3938 Briggs
Feb.
3, 20013809 BriggsKeg was found in apartment.
A basement window was
Student referred to college.
b k wim beer bottle
Jan. 31,2001
4012
Briggs
J
Loud party, abuse of quiet
hours,
excessive noise, illegalgathering.
Feb.
3,
20014012 BriggsLoud music after hours.
Feb.
3,2001
DuvalIntoxicated students, under- hallway.age
Feb.
3,2001
McAuley Hall
^
Broken furniture piled in the
For your informationJoe Clark lecture cancelled,
MSG
plans to reschedule
Mercyhurst Student Government apologizes for any inconvenience causedto students by
the
cancellation of the
MSG
Lecture
by Joe
Clark that
was
tobe held Tuesday,
Feb.
6. Due to adverse weather conditions Clark was un-able to make the trip from his
homeun
Newark, N.J. to Erie. MSG is in theprocess of trying to reschedule the lecture for sometime during the springterm.
Correction* [ f
In the Jan!
31
issue of The Merciad
a
story on the Center
City
Child Learn-ing Center ran on the front page. The tone of
the
story lead readers to be-lieve that
the
center
was
not open yet when in fact it
is.
The Merciad apolo-gizes for
any
confusion caused by the
error.
Anyone interested in obtainingmore information on the Center City Child Learning Center located at
139
W.
24th St.in Erie should call 459-1982*
*L
Oil
Change Service
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William
C.Riley
Store Manager
1320
E.
Grand
view
Blvd.Erie.
PA
16504814-825-7909
Attention MercyhurstStudents and Staff
10%
discount on allnon-sale services/itemsto those who show their
IDrV
' «r.j.». .
Laker Inn
Lunch
Menu
February 5,
2001—
February
10,
2001
Use your dining dollars. Food's great, so is the service. Also open for midnight snacks.
MondayCobb
SaladBread
sticks
20
oz.
Drink
Tuesday
Bagel SandwichFruit Cup
20
oz.
Drink*
WednesdaySizzling Salad
20
oz.
Drink*:Thursday^
Taco
Salad
20
oz.
DrinkFriday 1Deli SandwichSoup
20
oz.
DrinkSaturdayCheeseburgerSmall French Fries
20
oz.lDrink
Hours: Sat.
1
p.m.-7 pjn. Sun.
3£p.m.-l
a.m. Mon.-Thurs. 8
a.m.-l
aim.
iFri.
8
a.m.-7:30
p.m.
 
FEBRUARY
7. 2001
THEMERCIADPAGE
3
ARTS&
Tribute to Erie native
artistlBurieigh
In celebration of Black History Month, theMary
D'Angelo
Performing Arts Center
will
be honoring Erie native Harry T. Burleigh'sspiritual music Saturday, Feb. 10, at 8 p.m.in the PAC.
.$
Burleigh wasAmerica's first black Jconcert artist, composerof art
songs
and arrangerof spirituals for concertuse. After graduatingfrom the National Con-servatory of Music, hebecame a leading bari-tone soloist of his time,performing before such
\
notables of
the
day as Theodore Roosevelt,the Archbishop of Canterbury and King Ed-ward VII of England.The spiritual, a form of black folk musicthat developed during the experience of sla-very, had been transmitted in an oral tradi-
Liturgical Dancers
awp^:
tion. Fearing that this indigenous American
music
might die out, Burleigh, encouraged
by
the
compser
Dvorak, created arrangementsfor over 100 of these songs. As a result,Burleigh, more than any other person,
is
cred-
ited
with preserving andmaking
accessible "to
the world this rich veinof uniquely Americanmusic.Saturday's concert in-cludes musical works
I
the
-
v
.•*••*->-
•••-"••
File photo
presented
by
IMercyhurst Collegechoir, Mercyhurstchamber singers, andMaryAlice Brown, Charles Kennedy, HayesMoses, Tina Porter
and^narration
by MelWitherspoon.Come and enjoy
music
that illuminates yoursoul. Seating is reserved. Tickets are free toMercyhurst students.By Charon
Hrib
Contributing writerAs of September 2000, the Mercyhurst com-munity has officially been blessed with theaddition of a Liturgical Dance Ensemble.Sponsored by the Rev. James Piszker andGeraldine Rosinski, RSM of Campus Minis-try and Tauna Hunter of the Dance Depart-ment,
this
group
has
been
active
not only withcampus worship, but has also been workinghard to get involved with
Erie's
community.
Mercyhurst's
Liturgical
Dance
Ensemble isstudent directed by junior Elisabeth Shelton.Including Elisabeth, there are 14 dancers inthe group. Members include (seniors) SarahLucovich, Gretchen
Koskoski
and BruceSneed; (juniors) Elisabeth Shelton, ShannonSeedhouse and Maria Ellis; (sophomores)Tanya Trombly, Heather Richmond and LauraMoore; and (freshmen) Janet Struckley, LeahBannier, Liz Nahser, Lindsay Roller and
Kelsey
Pohm.This past year the Liturgical Dance En-semble has been active in establishing theirgroup.
Thus
far,
the group has
danced on cam-pus
at the
Mass of
he
Holy Spirit,
the
CandleLight Christmas:
Mass
and with the aid of
{Photo
by Mark Santillano
Heather Richmond, the dancers performedin the community at the Pine Valley NursingHome.The Liturgical Dance Ensemble has cur-rently sent out letters to various churches inthe Erie community in hopes of sharing theirgift
at
five Masses during
the
March and Aprilmonths.As for on campus events, those wishing tosee the Mercyhurst Liturgical Dance En-semble perform can look forward to theirdancing at Palm Sunday services
in April
andat the Graduation Masses in May.The group currently consists of dance ma-jors and dance minors, but according toShelton, the group would like to extend itswelcome to the entire student body in the fu-ture.
NttMt? JU\x
§m*j !.<!{»?
lAtBslle
An Affair ofLove
ifpr »«»«^!7»z~rxr
!_
PHOVE THtM WROVG
Playing
at
thePACFeb,
14
at 8 p.m.
I
I
GirlfightPlaying at the
Feb.
21 at
8
p.m.
'J*2«<««
.•«
r
U*»*mm
fc*0
Students free
— ENTERTAINMENT
Dinner and a movie
The Grotto
Check
)S
please
By Kristin Elizabeth
Purdv
Merciad writerLooking for
a
good home cooked
meal?
Lookno further.Many of you walked past the cafeteria andright past the Grotto, curiously looking insideand wondering. Of course, you
have
to put ina reservation to eat here, but the service andthe quality of the food
is well
worth the meal.
Meals
cost between
$5.50
and
$9
for
a
three-course meal including
ah
appetizer, an entre,a starch food, vegetables, dessert and bread.At any normal restaurant, this type of mealcould run you near
$20.
Save yourself the tripout of Mercy world and sample the vast arrayof dishes the Grotto has to offer.Hotel Restaurant and
Industitutional
Man-agement students are hard at work in and outof the kitchen, serving up lunches and dinnersthroughout the week. Students create themenus based
on
themes and
ethnic
foods, cre-ating a complete three-course meal thatcomplements
itself.
The Grotto is a non-profit organization
run
by HR1M students who are fulfilling lab
re-
quirements for classes. Whether they're
in
thekitchen cooking, serving you, or managing,they're hard at work and gaining valuable ex-|perience.Meals are planned, but if you decide thatwhat's on the menu doesn't suit your appetitefor
the
day,
there are always
alternatives
to
thestandard meal.The a la carte menu gives diners the optionof an onion loaf for $3.50, a grilled chickensalad for $5, or filet of scrod complete withappetizer, starch, vegetable and dessert for$8.50.
jft ;
Lunches are served Tuesdays and Thursdayswith seating from
11:45
a.m.
to
12:15
p.m. anddinners are served Wednesdays and Fridayswith seating
 from
 5:15
p.m. to 5:45 p.m. Res-ervations are required, as seating is limited tothe maximum of 60 diners, so plan accord-ingly. Stop by the Grotto to pick up a flyer ofscheduled
meals
and
to make
your reservation.You will be pampered and served by thefinest at Mercyhurst in the setting of
a
high-class facility.
HRIM
students enrolled in theapplied service class learn how to be profes-sional servers and move gracefully with con-fidence. While dining
in the
Grotto, you'
11
feelas if
vou're
away
 from
 campus in a ritzy res-taurant, eating one of the finest (and well-priced) meals you've ever sat down to.Any tips
left
for waiters go to a scholarshipfund for
HRIM
students, so don't be shy, it'sall for a good cause.''
For
reservations,
call the
HRIM office
at
ext.
2565
or
stop by the Grotto
tucked
in the
south-west corner of
the
Egan dining hall.
'O
Brother'
Ticket stub
By Phil PirrelloMovie critic
"O
Brother, Where Art Thou?
9
The Cohen brothers have provided humorous,if not
sensationally
overdone films about thelives of simpletons in the most complex ofsituations, usually based on criminalactivities. Where they succeeded with "Rais-ing Arizona," "The Big'Lebowski" and"Blood Simple," they have fallen short with"O Brother," in terms of having the formers'cinematic
impact.
This
film
throws
everythingat the wall, but very little sticks.The plot: The
film
borrows its plot fromHomer's "The Odyssey."
It opens
with the
es-
cape of three prisoners from
theirchain
gangin the
1920s
Mississippi.The leader, Ulysses Everett McGill, (playedwith great
comedic range by George
Clooney),
doesn't
much want to take along company,but because he is chained to
Delmar
(TimBlake Nelson) and Pete (John Turturro), hehas no choice. McGill convinces them thatthere
is a
hidden treasure waiting for them, sothey go along for a ride.
^Butthi^ride
is a bumpy one, as the threegoofy cons encounter a Cycloptian con manportrayed by John Goodman, who delivers aperformance that reminds us of how great hecan be, as seen in"Lebowski."The journey concludes with a disturbinglyfunny KKK rally
that
precedes an act of na-ture that hints DivineIntervention.The film'smiddle act felt
like-115
days, not
115
min-utes.
|
fc
The
good:
The
film
is
basically a few short
movie segments
strung together
into
a feature,and those little vignettes are better than thewhole.The sequence concerning the fugitive's en-counter with the Sirens is mesmerizing in itssimplicity. Using only the Sirens' hypnotic
-
song, it provides a brief instance where weactually care about
McGill's
motley crew.1 also enjoyed the scene where McGill andcompany sing
a
blue-grass song that becomesa
pop
hit around
the
country.
It's a
catchy tuneand Clooney and company sell the vignetteperfectly.The bad:
1
left
"O'
Brother" feeling par-tially satisfied, as though I had ordered Lon-don Broil and got a
Steak-Um
instead.
It
isnot a
bad
movie, but
it is
a bad Cohen movie.I don't expect films like
"O'
Brother" tosatisfy all my
movie-going
needs. But I doexpect them to not make me ask why such agreat collection of talent and ideas are setadrift in a not-so-great movie.
"O
Brother" has a case of the coulda,shoulda. It leaves the audience wondering ifthey shoulda seen something else.
The Street Beat!
MERCYWORLD
"Show Me Lovemovie in the PAC Feb. 7 at
8
p.m.Coffee House: Fade
2
Shade — band in the Union
Feb.
9 from 10:30 p.m. to
1:30
a.m
Tribute to Harry
T.
Burleigh in the PAC Feb.
10
at 8 p.m.Diversity 101 Dance in the Union
Feb.
10 from
10
p.m. to 2
a.m
AROUND TOWN
Blues Beaters playing at Quaker Steak & Lube Feb. 7 at
7
p.m. to
10
p.mThe Pat McGee Band playing at Docksider
Feb.
8"The
Uninvited"—play
at Mercyhurst's
North
East campus
at the Alex
Theater
Feb.
10 at 8
p.m
M
Chicago-The
Musical" at Warner Theater
Feb.
13
at 7:30 p.m.

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