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The Merciad, Feb. 6, 2003

The Merciad, Feb. 6, 2003

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The Merciad, Feb. 6, 2003
The Merciad, Feb. 6, 2003

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06/07/2011

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ARTS&
ENTERTAINMENT
THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OP MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929'TheHours'isn't worth
the
time
PAGE 8
Special
Report:
US
mourns
loss
of space
shuttle
Columbia
PAGE
2
~
LAKER
SPORTS
Men's volleyball opens2003
seasonPAGE 12Vol.
76 No.34
Mercyhurst
College^Ol
E.
38thgSt.
Erie Pa. 16546February
6,U003
Mercyhurst under construction:
Academic reorganization a possibility in
college's
future
Bulletin^Board
Feb.
6
-
Pax
Christimeeting in
Hirt M206
from
8-9
p.m.
:
i
Feb.
7
- Women's hockeyin the Ice Arena
at 7
p.m.Feb.
7 -
Date Auction
inthe
Union
 from
 7-10
p.m.Feb. 8 - International FoodNight
 from
 8-9:30
p.m.Feb.
11
- Fashion
CI
ubmeeting
in HEC101 at 8
p.m.
Feb
11-
Gay/StraightAlliance meeting in HirtM206
8:15-10p.m.
Feb.
12-
c
Dr.
Strangelove'in the
PAC
 from
 8-11
p.m.
Guess Who?
Index
News
1
Special Report
2
News
3
Features
4
Features
5
Opinion
°
Opinion
'
A&El
8
A&EI
9
Sports
•••• 1°
Sports
11
Sports
..
12
By Kelly Rose Duttine
News editorAcademic departments
at
Mercyhurst may undergo significant changes in the near future.
Dr.
Andrew
Roth, Dean of Academics for Mercyhurst recent-
ly
wrote and delivered
a
proposal to reorganize the divisionalstructure of the college to theFaculty Senate.The proposal suggests revisions for the college departments, but the Faculty Senate,under
the
direction of
President
Dr. Barbara Behan formed anad-hoc committee to determinethe best approach for the re-organization of college departments."The ad hoc committee willreport its findings back to theFaculty Senate and then willpresent its revisions to the proposal to Dr. Roth," explainedBehan. This
way,
the best
com-
Rto photo
Dr.
Andrew Roth, Dean of Academics proposes to reorganize
the
divisional structure of
the
college.
promise will hopefully bereached, with faculty
and
administrative input.Roth thinks that the new planwould
have
little impact on current Mercyhurst students. "No
Generator overheats in Hirt
Erie
fire department responds to thealarm.
File photo
Erie firetrucks respond to many Mercyhurst problems, including alarms at Hirt onSaturday.
By Kristin Purdy
Editor-in-ChiefThe
Erie
Fire
Department responded to an alarm at the
Hirt
Academic Center
the
morningof Saturday, Feb. 1. Three engines responded to
a
call
about
smoke
on
the
 first
loor.
The
fire
department investigated the
ca 11
and left the premises
after
30minutes.Contrary to rumors, there
was
no fire;
a
generator on
the
first floor overheated.
An
external
incident caused an
electrical
breaker to shut
off.
A powersurge ran through the breakerbut its origin is unknown.
This
resulted in the electrical breaker possibleshutting off.The Hirt Academic Centerwas designed to activate thegenerator in the south side ofthe building when a breakershuts off. The generator is programmed to close louvers insuch incidences. This
past
Saturday, however, the
heat
builtup in the generator caused thesprinklers to go off in
that area.After
the sprinklers went off,they had to be recharged andthe breakers
were
reset.Tom
Billingsley,
Executive
Vice-President
for
Adm
inisii.ition,
su
KI,
"Forlu
nately, all
systems worked as
designed except
for
the louver
controls."
The system shut the doorsdown as programmed, lettingHirt occupants out
of
the building but not
in
without proper access,said Ken
Si
dun,
Director!
of Security Services.Mercyhurst Police Sergeant
Kens
ill
said
the whole
campus
was affected by
this
incident.The controlled locks outsidedoors in
Hirt and
the dormswere
affected
Doors
had
to bemanually opened with a masterkey until the system was
fixed
early afternoon on Monday."The software for the generator room has been re programmed
to keep
doors open
[not
locked] for any
future
problems.
In the
future,
the college
shouldn't
have any moreproblems," said Kensill,department
will
be altered or
eliminated,"
said Roth. "If
stu
dents notice any changes, they
The newstructure of thecollege willbetter serve thefaculty and
growinglstudent
body...
J s
-Dr. Andrew Roth
will have quicker access to anassociate dean, a decision maker."
|
The "school" configurationswill change however, and thechange could happen as early asfall of 2003. The proposal callsfor four, five or six schools tobe created and house 27 current academic departments.
The
proposal also calls for thecreation ofa
new
faculty administrative position. Each school
will
have an associate dean,who will oversee every school,the students, faculty and courses.Most responsibilities of theassociate dean position have yetto be determined.
g
Roth explained that the initialconcern for restructuring thedepartments into schools is because Mercyhurst is continuously expanding. "There is agreat need for more facultymembers and students to haveaccess to a decision maker, and
the
proposal allows them toreach an associate
dean
for every school quickly," said Roth."The new structure ofthe college will better serve the faculty and growing student body bybringing decision making closer to them," said Roth.Look for more informationabout restructuring
the
collegedepartments in future articles in
The
Merciad.
W.H.I.S.P.E.Rgrants scholarships
By
Scott Mackar
Assistant news
editor
On Jan.
9,
the Ebony Fashion Fair Committee ofW.H.I.S.P.E.R (Women
Helping
Interested Students PursueEducation Resources) presented Mercyhurst College with
$ 12,000
in support of
the
college's minority scholarshipfund,Tyrone Moore, AssociateVice President of Administration and head of the minorityscholarship program; and Dr.William P.
Garvey.
President ofMercyhurst College acceptedthe donation on behalf of the
college.
Presenting the
award
were Ebony Fashion Fair Com-
mittee
members ConnieBoone-Manus, Barbara Steeleand Julia Jefferson.Moore said that the scholarship was started by the organization
because they
were im-pressed with the quality
of
minority graduates that werecoming out of MercyhurstCollege. They wanted to assist
individuals
in a very special
way.
The committee decided
five
years ago to start donating themoney to the Mercyhurst minority scholars program.Moore said over the past
five
years
the)
have had four fashion fairs
in
Erie,
and every year
they would
contribute
the
pro-
Please
see
Moore on
page
3
Columbia mourned
KRT
NASA
flight test engineer Alex
Dula
Jr. bows his head ata memorial service for
the
crew of the space shuttle Columbia. Please see related articles on page 2.
«
*
 
PAGE
2
THEMERCIADFEBRUARY
6,2003
^SPECIAL
REPORT
To
contact:
UA
mourns loss
of
Columbia
As NASA investigation continues, people ask why
and
pray
Plotr Wolinski
/
Contributing Writer
Mercyhurst College
honors
the
memory of the astronauts,
by
flying
the flag at half mast
-
Space
in
our
hearts
Americans will
look
again towards
the heaven
Editorial StaffKnight
Ridder Newspapers
No human endeavor in the last half-century has inspired ournation and captivated our imagination like space
flight.
The
tragedy brought a
horrible
reminder that, although we have learnedhow to explore space, we may
nevei
conquer it.
The
tragedy of
the
shuttle
Columbia, which broke apart
in
flight
only
16
minutes before returning to Earth, again jarred Americans into a shared lesson of
what's
important in our lives.That lesson also was taught
17
years ago when the space shut
tie
Challenger exploded shortly after
takeoff.
That horror, watchedon television by
so
many, was supposed to have
made
Americansrealize that space travel had not become as routine as it seemed.This time even heroes who died doing what they love. President Bush said it
best:
"The cause in which they died will contin
ue.
Mankind is led into the darkness beyond our world by theinspiration of discovery and
the
longing to understand. Our journey into space will go on."It must go on. The nation recovered
 from
he Apollo tragedy in
1967,
and from the loss of the shuttle Challenger in 1986.The space program should, and
will,
rebound.There is, of
course,
another dimension to this unearthly blow.The Sept.
11
attacks have
made
it hard
to
believe that any calamity that so rips holes in the American heart is an accident. Questions have arisen already about whether terrorism was the forcebehind the
fire
in the sky.
No
one would want federal officials
to
ignore
any
possible
cause.
But the public should start with the understanding that spacetravel is inherently dangerous and that conspiracy as a possibleanswer is as remote as Pluto.This year, America will celebrate the 100th anniversary of
hu-
man flight. As the nation mourns today for the astronauts andtheir families, let us in time turn our eyes once more to the starsand permit ourselves to dream again of the possible.
Columbia'screw
A
brief
look
at
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tourchmn
waro
Bush
memorializes seven astronauts,
says
space program
'will go
on'
By Ron Hutcheson
1
Knight Ridder NewspapersStanding before the weepingrelatives of
the
lost
shuttle
astronauts, President Bush
on
Tuesday invoked their memory with a vow that "America'sspace program will go on."Bush made the commitmentto
an
emotional audience
of
more than 10,000 NASA
workers and contractors who gathered
at the
space
agency's
headquarters for a tearful
fare
well to the seven astronauts ofthe space shuttle Columbia.Despite the size of
the
crowd,the memorial felt more like
a
private chapel service
as
NASAworkers shared anecdotesabout their co-workers whodied Saturday morning whenthe shuttle broke up over Tex
as.
Bush said
the
seven astronauts fulfilled
"an
ancientdream of humanity" by leavingbehind "Earth and air
and
gravity" in a quest for knowledge."This cause
of
explorationand discovery is not an optionwe choose;
it
is
a
desire written
in
the human
heart,"
he
said.
"We are that part
of
creationwhich seeks
to
understand
all
creation." His reaffirmation ofsupport for the space programwas
a
comforting message
to
a crowd with an intensely personal interest in
Saturday's
disaster. Bush
and his
wife,Laura,
sat
among more thantwo dozen relatives of the fallen astronauts.Other audience memberslaughed knowingly
when Navy
Capt. Kent
Rom
inger,
the
chiefof
the
astronaut corps, offereda series of anecdotes about allseven astronauts! He recalledthe shuttle crew's high-spiritedantics
at the
last NASA
holidayparty, when they slapped temporary tattoos with the mis
sion's
identifying designation
on
anyone who came near their
table,
i i 4
KRT
Members
of
the training team for the latest space shuttle Columbia mission cry duringa memorial service Tuesday,
Feb.
4,
in Houston, Texas.
"The
world
lost
seven heroes.We lost seven family mem-
bers,"
Rom inger
said.
Address
ing his departed colleagues by
name,
he
added:
"I
know you'relistening. Please know you'rein our hearts. We will alwayssmile when we think of you."Seventeen years ago, NASAhosted
a
similar remembrancefor the crew of the space shut
tle
Challenger,
which
explodedover Florida shortly after take-off. NASA administrator Sean
O'Keefe
promised
a
thoroughinvestigation of
the
most recentaccident "to make sure it neverhappens again."Outside the gates of NASA'sheadquarters, hundreds of oth
er
people held
their own makeshift memorial service.
"We
love
our astronauts
herejust as they love their firemenin New York," said Kathryn
Lott,
a
Clear
Lake
resident who
came
on her
lunch
break.
While
some mourners placed flowersor read poems, others simplymilled about."Every person coming
out
here has some type
of
hurt,"said Gene Grounds, the
direc
tor
of
victim
Chaplain, a Dallas-based Baptist disaster-relieforganization.John Cobarruvias brought
his
8-year-old
son, David, whowas dressed in a blue astronautflight suit Cobarruvias couldn'texplain why he had come."Hard
to
explain," said theNASA computer analyst.Bush, who paid tribute
to
each
of
the seven astronautsindividually, said they faced therisks of their work with joy."Yet, some explorers do notreturn. And the loss settles unfairly
on
a
few," Bush
said.
"Tothe children who miss yourMom
or
Dad
so
much today,you need
to
know, they loveyou, and that love will alwaysbe with you."Bush
recalled
that CommanderRick
HUsband,
the
missioncommander, was fond
of
thehymn,
f
How Great Thou Art,"which includes the
I
ines,
"I seethe stars.
I
hear
the
mightythunder.
Thy
power throughoutthe universe is displayed."In the front row, Husband's
wife,
Evelyn, wept while
her
daughter leaned against
her
shoulder. After the ceremony,Bush
met
privately with
family
members and told them that hestruggled to maintain his composure during
the
brief remarks,according to an administrationofficial who was in
the
room.
*Tm
sorry we have to meetunder these circumstances,"Bush told the families, according to the official, who briefedreporters on the condition
of
anonymity.
Bush
traveled
to
Texas
on AirForce One with former astro
nauts
John Glenn
and
Neil Armstrong. Glenn was
the
firstAmerican
to
orbit the earth;Armstrong
was the
first humanto walk on the moon.The memorial service washeld under
a
clear
blue
sky,
re-
markably
similar to the
back
drop
for
Saturday's accident.At the end
of
the
55-minute
ceremony, four white
T-38
trainer aircraft roared overhead,with one peeling away
in
themissing man formation.
"This
type of thing is alwaysneeded," said Tom Moser,
a
former director of engineeringfor NASA.
"It
was importantfor NASA people to hear this,and for
the
citizens of he United States, the world, even."
Problems started during
the
blast
off
«.t
By
Martin MerzerKnight Ridder Newspapers
KRT
A
nearly
2-foot-long
chunk
of
debris that peeled
off
space
shuttle
Columbia's external fueltank and struck the left wingduring blastoff Jan. 16
is the
most likely cause of the calam
ity
that destroyed
the
shuttle
and
killed
all
seven astronauts,NASA officials said Monday."We're making the assumption that the external tank wasthe root cause of the accident,"said Ron Dittemore, the shuttle's program manager. "It is adrastic assumption and it's sobering, but
I
think that's whatwe need to do."In effect, he was suggestingthat Columbia was doomed atlaunch and its crew flew for
16
days with no one
in
space
or
on Earth recognizing the danger.
I
He said the slab of insulatingfoam
thai
struck the left wingwas 20 inches long,
16
incheswide and
6
inches thick,
con
siderably larger than previously suggested.
It
weighed 2.67pounds, he
said
More than 20,000 tiles
blan
ket
the
shuttle
to
protect
it
fromtemperatures that can reach
3,000
degrees
as it
scorchesthrough the air on its return toEarth.Engineers
and
astronauts
havewarned
repeatedly
over
the
years about
the
dangers of evena
slight
breach
in
that protective shield.Theoretically,
if
the dangerhad been recognized
during
the
initial minutes
of
flight,
Columbia
could have
attempted
a
riskyaborted launch and emergencylanding at the Kennedy SpaceCenter or an overseas site.Space agency officials thinkthe rapidly cascading series ofevents that destroyed Column'bia began along
its
left side.During
the
mission's final eightminutes, sensors showed thattemperatures on and near Columbia's left wing rose quicklyand
to
previously unseen lev
els,
engineers said."There's some other event,some other missing link that iscontributing to this event," hesaid. "It's a mystery to us and
we
seem
to
have some
conflict
ing
information."
A
key to unlocking that mystery could lie in
a
few
pieces
oftile that may have landed
in
California or Nevada, or wereground to powder in the atmosphere. If they still exist, theymay be the first pieces
to
falloff Columbia, and key piecesof evidence."Where
are
they?"
Dittemoreasked. "That's a difficult problem, but
we
have people tryingto solve that problem. It's likelooking for a needle in a haystack."
f
roughout the day,
Ditte-
more
and other NASA officialswrestled with questions aboutthe agency's assessment
of
the
risk posed
by the
damage
to
the
wing's
insulating
tile.
Mike
Kostelnik,
a deputy associate administrator, said thepossible effects were investigated by "the best and bright-
est'fat
NASA.
I lo
said
he.
Re
ad
dy and other top agency
of
ficials saw the engineering reports and agreed with the con
clusions
that
a
safe
landing
had
not been compromised.On Monday, second thoughtsclearly were evident."We will go back and reviewthose data,"
Readdy
said.
<
KRT
The space shuttle Columbia blasted off Thursday,
Jan
16.
Attention Students!!
Deadline for
filing for financial
aid
for
all
stu
dents
ist
March
15,2003
Are you ready?
All
students
who
intend to return to Mercyhurst
for
the 2003-2004 academic year must
file
paperwork with the Financial Aid
office
no later
than
March 15th
 
FEBRUARY
6,2003
THE
MERCIADPAGE 3
Brown receives
$35,000
grant
professor
to
study
carbon nanotubes
By Jess TobinContributing
Wri
ter
Di
Ron Brown has been achemistry and physics teacherat Mercyhurst College for thepast four years. The Flint,Mich, native received hisbachelor's degree fromMichigan State University andreceived his Ph.D. from theUniversity of
Minnesota./
He recently found out that hewill be receiving a $35,000grant from the AmericanChemical Society (ACS) to doa study on carbon nanotubes.The money
comes-from
thePetroleum Research
Fund.
This company fundschemical research done onenergy issues.Carbon nanotubes are arecently discovered form ofpure carbon (such as diamond
or
graphite)
that
are in the
formof thread-like tubes. The tubesare
very
small;
so
small that they
can't even be seen with anoptical microscope.A carbon nanotube actuallyhas the potential to be used inhydrogen
fuel
cells, and couldpossibly be a significantalternative to the use of fossilfuels.
\
:
l
The title of
Dr£
Brown'sproject is "HydrogenAbsorption to carbonnanotubes: a computationalstudy of chemisorption energyas
ajfunction
of nanotubegeometry."The basic central questionthat he is trying to answer by
Traun Moore/Contributing
photographer
Dr.
Brown
of
the
chemistry deparment will involve students with
his
study
of carbon nanotubes.
doing
this
project
is
whether
or
not carbon nanotubes canabsorb enough hydrogen fortheir potential as an alternativeto fossil fuels to be
real i
zed.The reason that"computational" is used in thetitle of the study is because allof Dr. Brown's research
will
bedone using computers.At Mercyhurst we have aComputational Chemistryprogram. All of the chemicalstructures and reactions beinganalyzed can be modeled andviewed
on
computers using thesophisticated software that ourchemistry department hasaccess to.
£The
$35,000 grant will beprimarily for the 2003-2004and the 2004-2005 academicschool years.Dr. Brown hopes to involve
two
to
three students
during thenext year. The students that hechooses will most likely beupper-division chemistry andbiochemistry majors.Any extra money left overfrom the grant Dr. Brown willuse to offer several summerresearch assistantships for
Mercyhurst
chemistry studentsduring the summer of 2004.
Moore accepts funds
W.H.I.S.P.E.R
donates to Mercyhurst
Continued from page 1
the proceeds
to
Mercyhurst
and
other charitable organizations.Over the past couple of yearsthey decided to make all theircontributions to the college."They
have a real
appreciationon what Mercyhurst Collegedoes
as a
whole
with its studentbody and
*how
we haveaccelerated our admissions,"Moore said.Over the past five years thescholarship has built up to$12,000. Mercyhurst alsodecided that they would matchthe contributions made by the
W.H.I.S P.E.R.
committee,now making the scholarship$24,000.
|
"Mercyhurst College wouldmatch
the
number of
dollars
the
committee contributed in orderto establish an endowedscholarship in their name," hesaid.The scholarship will be
available next
fall
to at
least
two
minority students already
%mu They have
a
realappreciation
on what
Mercyhurst Collegedoes
on a
whole with
its
student body
andhow
we
haveaccelerated
ouradmissions.
/!)%
-Tyrone Moore
enrolled on campus or toincoming freshman. Mooresaid the criteria has yet to beestablished, but they arebeginning to set one up."The criteria
will
probablyfall in line with the criteriaunder the minority
scholars
program in general, but it hasyet to be determined," he said.Moore said MercyhurstCollege needs to build itsminority population,
and
this
isa good way to begin.He said that the college islooking for quality students,
but
every college
is
doing
the
same.He hopes that this scholarshipopens up a few opportunitiesfor minority students atMercyhurst and incomingfreshman who
are
looking
to
gohere."This
is a
wonderful
thing that
the
W.H.I.S.P.E.R.
committeewould think that highly ofMercyhurst College and ourstudent body to want tocontribute to our long-term
-
well being," Moore said.
Graduate openhouses scheduled
To
NEWS
Interface: Scienceat your fingertips
Compiled by Megan
Fialkovich
Contributing writerErie,PA: Those unfortunateindividuals whom suffer fromgradual or traumatic loss ofsight due to corneal defectsmay benefit the most fromrevolutionary optical surgery.While not a new idea (over47,000 successful transplantsare performed annually at StVincent's from cadaver-harvested tissue), theprocedure is utilizingprogressively thinner sutures,which are about the width ofa human hair. Intenseoperating-room microscopy,robotic surgery arms and asteady supply of organ donors
make these
advances possible.Furthermore, the promise of
genetically-engineered
corneas, as well as a host ofother organs, increase thechances of
a
child born blindtoday being
able
to
see beforetheir tenth birthday,
{Source: Erie Times-News)
Johnson Space Center,Houston TX: Memorialservices for crew of theSpace Shuttle Columbia arescheduled for
1
p.m. E/S onThursday at the NationalCathedral
in
Washington
D.C.;
meanwhile, investigations areon-going with the
 friends
 andcolleagues of the intrepid menand
women
who
lost
their livesearly Saturday. In MissionControl Center's Official 21
s
]report on the event, NASArecognizes no official cause,although what
coulctfbecome
months or years of scrupulousstudy will include a close
look
at the "left hand wheel wellarea," where temperaturefluctuations were recorded
by
on-board instruments sevenminutes before contact waslost. Official press releasesfrom NASA have askedAmerican citizens for
help
in
providing
private footage of hedisaster, and surrendering anydebris
from the
STS-107. Notsince the Challenger explodedduring lift-off of its tenthmission
on Jan.
28,1986, haveAmericans experienced such adisaster on a routine spacemission. The first Israeliastronaut
was
also lost
on-boardthe Columbia. Their braveryand selfless contributions willnot be forgotten.
(Source:
eoi
ingredients of smokedtobacco are introduced to thebody. Long-time smokerscompose the majority of the
157,000
Americans who
will
die of lung cancer this year,but 9-cis- and
13-cis-retinoic
acid cause skin rashes
in
theirnatural state, so a pill ortreatment
using them
is yet
tocome.
Users
of pipe, chewingor cigar tobacco, however,will not benefit from theseantioxidants, as they are atgreater risk for mouth andthroat
cancer.
Cosmetologists
have known
about
the
secretsof minimally irritatingantioxidant
compounds;"for
years,
since
the
age-reversingproperties include increasing
the
tensile
strength of
he
skin.In
pother
words, if thedevelopment of synthesized
9-cis-retinoic
acid isachieved, grab some beforeJoan Rivers gobbles it all up.
{Source
Reuters)
Washington, D.C.: Leadingoncologists (cancer specialists)are promoting an antioxidantrelative of good ol* vitamin Aas a raw
material
for
reversing
early signs of lung cancer.Dubbed with the catchy label"9-cis-retinoic acid," this
material
is
said
to
repair
damage
to the RAR beta-gene insmokers
whom have
quit.
When properly?working, thisgene suppresses the growth ofbronchi pulmonary lesions,which can grow
into
malignanttumors when the carcinogenicIn Memory of the FallenCrew of the Columbia:February
1j
2003
"I shall ascend into
the
space
of
light,
I
shall cross
the face of the
Earths
I
shall walk
in the
light,
And I
shall wait upon
thestars...
[Egyptian Sarcophagus
Texts,Alan
Gardiner,
Chapter
545].
KRT
WASHINGTON,
D.C.
—- Michael
Kostelnlk briefs reporters on the latest
Information
onthe space shuttle Columbia disaster at NASA headquarters on Tuesday, February
4,
2003,
in
Washington,
D.C.
(
i
I
&.
$.4
i
f
£
The
office of adult and graduate programs at MercyhurstCollege will host two openhouses in February for prospective students.
B
oth pro
gram
s will be offered at theCatherine
Mc Auley
Adult Education Center, 3928 Wayne St.,which is situated at the easternedge of the Mercyhurstcampus. The first program,an information session highlighting the college's 17 post-baccalaureate teacher certification offerings,
wi) I
be Thursday,
Feb.
6, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.The second event, an openhouse outlining the graduateprograms offered at Mercyhurst, will be Thursday, Feb.
13,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.Teachers who wish to add anew area of certification or individuals with a non-teachingbachelor's degree who want toobtain teacher certificationwould benefit
from
the firstsession, which wi
11
featurepresentations
from
Mercyhurst'seducation and admissions departments as well as the officeof adult
and
graduate programs.Prospective students who wantto learn about graduate programs will have the opportunity to meet directors of the various programs at the secondsession, which
will
feature presentations by
Dr.
Frank
I
lagan,director of graduate
adm
inistra-
tion of justice; Robert Heibel,director of the Research/Intelligence Analyst Program
(R/
IAP);
Dr.
Phillip Bel
flore, director of graduate special education; Dr. Mary Breckenridge,
associate dean
for
graduate
programs and academic services;and Lynda
Schaaf,
director ofthe Adult Education Center andgraduate student
services.For
more
in form at
ion, contact theoffice of adult and graduateprograms at 824-2294.
Rising cost of education
Student loans
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irm
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 pay off
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Average Mercyhurst Costs:
Tuition: $14,820
Fees:
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1,050
Room
and
Board:
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