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The Merciad, Feb. 13, 2003

The Merciad, Feb. 13, 2003

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The Merciad, Feb. 13, 2003
The Merciad, Feb. 13, 2003

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ARTS &
I
ENTERTAINM ENT
Date Auction: fiindraisingsuccess or collegiate "escort
I
service?'!THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929Saddam
a "serial
liar"
PAGE
2
0
LAKER
SPORTS
Women's Hockey sweepsWayne StatePAGE 12
Vol!
76 Noil5
Mercyhurst College
501 E.
38tKSt|Erie
Pa.
16546Febniary 13,2003
u
Mercyhurst
StudentEthnicity
Please see page
3
for aindepth study of
Mercyhurst's
ethnicity
Bulletin Board
Feb.
11-14
- Flower andsinging telegram sale in
D'Angelo
Lobby or outsideWalker Recital Hall. $5
Feb.
14 - Men's Hockey vs.Sacred Heart
in
the Ice Arena
at 7
p.m.
Feb.
15
- Brain Bee in Zum
114
from 12-4 p.m. CallDarlene Melchitzky at ext.3342
for more
information.
Feb.
15 - Mentalist inWebber Recital Hall from 9-
10:30
p.m.
|
Feb.
16 - Nunsenseperformance
in
Taylor LittleTheater at 2:30 p.m.
Feb.
18 *- 1
ecture: Dr.Jawanza
Kunjufu,
Black
educator
in the PAC at 8:30p.m.
Feb.
19
- "Secretary" moviein the PAC from
8-11
p.m.
Guess
Who?
Index
News
4
%
'
News
2
News
«>
j3
Features
i\
4
Features
5
Opinion
6
Opinion
'
A&E
8
A&E\
;
:
9
Sports
10
Sports
11
Sports
12
Event
2003 phone-a-thon ends successfully
By
Jess
To bin
andKeUv Rose
Duttine
Thanks to 324 students, al-most
2,000
pledges and over
$100,000,
5
the
2003 Mercy-hurst College phone-a-thonwas a huge, record breakingsuccess. With the hard workof
so
many volunteers and or-ganizers who worked to "pre-serve the legacy," the phone-
a-thon
should
surpass all
2003goals.The Mercyhurst phone-a-thon began
in
January of
1981under the
direction
of Gary
L.Bukowski
who is now the Vice
President of Institutional Ad-vancement. He created thephone-a-thon
as a
way of alk-ing to the college's alumniabout the annual
fund
effort.
Interestingly
enough, at thattime Mercyhurst did not havethe telephone numbers theyneeded in order to call the
4,000+
alumni. With the aimof
obtaining
the numbers thatthey needed, Denise Mall,class of 1982, spent her workstudy hours calling directoryassistance for the entire database helping create the veryfirst successful phone-a-thon.This year's phone-a-thonwas run from Jan.
19
untilFeb. 6 under the direction ofSteve
Zinram,
Director of
the
Annual
Fund.
This
year's goalwas set at $100,000 with atotal of
2,000
pledges. As ofFeb. 7, the phone-a-thon hadreceived 1,932 pledges total-
Knsten Maillard/Contributing
photographer
The 2003
phone-a-thon
had a
record breaking
year,
including more student volunteers thanever before.
ing $96,479. "The annual fundand alumni offices have morepledges to confirm and we areconfident
I hal we will surpass the
goals," said Zinram.The purpose of the Mercyhurstphone-a-thon
is to
raise funds forstudent financial
aid.
Current par-ents, past parents, of alumni whostill support the college and thealumni themselves
are
called andasked
to
pledge.
This
year,
how-
ever, parents and alumni donat-ing money were given the op-tion to designate their pledgesto the Old Main and
Zum Hall
renovations in addition to stu-dent financial aid.It was surprising to all in-volved with the phone-a-thonthat this was a record breaking
year,
because
of
he
current stateof the economy. "It's remark-able that we raised so muchmoney this year, when schoolsacross the country are losing
donations
 from
 alumni
and par-ents," said
Zinram*'*
Sixteen clubs and organiza-tions here
on
campus participat-ed in the phone-a-thon andhelped make it successful. TheAmbassadors Club were on thetop of
the
calling groups with
871
pledges totaling
a
whopping$47,549.v
\
The women's hockey teamwas not far
behind.
Otherjgroups and organizations thatparticipated included: men's
hockey,
men's
volleyball, wom-
en's volleyball, the cheerlead-ers, the dance
team,
the
HRIM
department, football, men's la-crosse, women's lacrosse,softball, women's basketball,rowing, field
hockey,
and
wres-tling.Special thanks go to the 324student volunteer callers thatmade the 2003 phone-a-thonend in great success."This is the highest studentparticipation we have ever hadhelp out with the phone-a-thon," said Zinram
"It has
al-
ways been my intention to have
this
many
students participate."
The 2003
phone-a-thon mademany advances over theamounts collected last year.The total calls made in thisyear's phone-a-thon added upto 19,127 vs. 16,562 in 2002.There were
6,089
people spo-ken to versus
4,976
in 2002.
A special
congratulation goesto senior Michelle Logsdon ofthe Ambassadors Club for be-
ing the top
individual
caller this
year with 91 pledges and$9,755.
\ I
For
more update
informationabout the phone-a-thon,please see future articles of
The Merciad
No,
you're
not getting tallerthe portal's shorter
9
I [
M
DRi i nun
MSG news
iMf,
By Dave
Del
Vecchio
andKelly
Rose Duttine
Jody
Mollo/Merciad photographer
Who would have thought that the newest, most expensive building on campus wouldhave the most problems? The portal outside of
the
Audrey
Hlrt
Academic Center hassunk two inches since the beginning of
the
academic school
year.
I
The Administration passed
a "Campus
Beautification"
pro-posal,
which includes the
instal-lation of bike racks, garbagecans, park benches and treeson Briggs and LewisAvenues. It also will include
the removal
of
the fence around
the
grill
area in the "HangingGardens." This has beendrafted with
the
cooperation ofthe Mercyhurst Green Team.
[ The
 first
 Charity
Snow
Ballwas held on Jan.
31
to benefit
the Erie
Crimes
victims
Center(formerly
the
Rape Crisis Cen-ter.) So far, the proceeds arestill coming in, but the currentdonation is $1,200.00. J
A
proposal
has
been givento the administration for
a
run-time
Shut!
le
Driver; this couldmean increased operation fornext year on the MSG shuttle,going to the
Mall
and StateStreet.The second MSG lectureof the 2002-2003 LectureSe-ries will
be
presented on Tues-day, Feb.
18.
Dr.
Jawanza
Kunjufu,
an renowned AfricanAmerican author and educa-
tional
speaker
will address
stu-dents in
the?D'Angelo
Per-forming Arts Center at 8:30p.m.Dr. Kunjufu has writtenmany books, including "De-
veloping Positive
Self-imagesand Discipline in Black Chil-
dren",
"Motivating
and Prepar-ing
Black
Youth for Success,""Lessons
 from
 History:
A Cel-ebration in Blackness," "Criti-
cal
Issues in Educating Afri-can American
Youth,"
"BlackEconomics: Solutions forCommunity and EconomicEmpowerment,"
and
"Adam!
Where Are You? Why MostBlack Men Don't Go ToChurch" J;
I
Students interested in attend-ing the lecture can pick uptickets
beginning
Feb.
11
withstudent ID at the Box office.
Faculty and staff may pick
uptheir tickets Feb.13-18.Boxoffice hours are Tuesday,Thursday and Friday
10-12
noon and
1 -4
p.m., Wednes-day
10-12
noon and
1-6:30
p.m. and Saturday
11-3
p.m.
Anyone with questions
regard-ing the lecture or tickets cancall ext. 2428. 1
«
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD
FEBRUARY 13,
2003
NEWS
I
INTERNATIONAL
As U.N. gathers more data, Bush team calls Saddam
'serial liar'
By Shannon McCaffrey,Daniel Rubin and Diego
Ibarguen
Knight Ridder NewspapersWASHINGTON
United
Na-tions weapons inspectors onSunday said Iraqi officials ap-pear to be taking disarmamenttalks more
seriously
and havehanded
over
new
documents
on
anthrax,
nerve gas and
missile
developmentThe Bush administration re*sponded with skepticism andsaid time was running out forIraq to come
clean.
NationalSecurity Adviser CondoleezzaRice on Sunday called Iraqileader
Saddam
Hussein
"a
seri-al
liar" who
built
up his
weap-ons
of mass destruction over
12 years
in
defiance
of U.N. dis-armament demands.
"The Iraqis are playing
a
game
here," Rice said on CNN."They do this every time theyfeel a
little
bit ofpressure. Whatthey're trying to
do
is create alittle bit of sense that they'removing
forward
so they canrelease
the pressure on them-selves.
But
they have
one
thingto do and one thing
only,
andthat is to disarm" and answerquestions
about
what happenedto their
chemical
and biologicalweapons.Chief
weapons inspector Hans
Blix, speaking to reporters af-ter his Saturday and Sundaytalks in Baghdad, said:
"I
hopeI have seen in those days thebeginning of taking these re-maining disarmament issues
KRT
Sen.
Norm Coleman (R-MN), John Negroponte U.S. Permanent Rep. to the
UN.,
Sen. Richard Lugar (R-IN), and U.S.Deputy Secretary of State Richard
Armitage
talk before testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee onthe United Nations weapons inspector team's report on Iraq
more seriously.'
"We
impressed upon the Ira-qis
that
we
need quick
progressand drastic change.
... Yes, wehave seen progress but
we
needquick
progress," chief nuclearweapons inspector MohamedElBaradei said.Blix said Iraqi officials turnedover a number of new papers
related
to the country's chemi-
cal
and biological weapons, buthe said they needed to be ex-amined
further
to assess their
value.
Iraqi
presidential adviser
Amer al Saadi
said
officials alsohad supplemented a list of thecountry's nuclear scientists.Blix said Iraq had not agreed
to
the use ofAmerican U-2 sur-veillance planes.President Bush kept up thepressure
on the
United Nations.In a speech before a Republi-can policy conference in
White
Sulphur Springs, W. Va.,
Bush
said the international body fac-es a "a moment of truth.""The
United
Nations gets todecide shortly whether or notit is going to be relevant interms of keeping the peace,whether or not its words meananything,"
Bush
said. "But onething is certain. For the sake ofpeace and the sake of the se-curity of
the
United States andour friends and allies, we willdisarm Saddam Hussein if hewill not disarm
himself.
"He's used to fooling theworld. He's confident
he
canfool
the
world. He wants theworld to
think
hide
and
seek isa game we should
play.
It'sover," Bush said.France and Germany haveproposed
to
beef
up
the
inspec-tion teams. The German maga-zine
Der
Spiegel
reported detailsof
a
plan by the
two
countries,I saying that U.N.
weapons
in-spections would be tripled, allIraqi flights
would
be banned
and
U.N. peacekeepers would
be
deployed.
'S
German Defense Minister
Pe-ter
Struck confirmed a plan
was
being
discussed,
but
wouldnot give
details.
He said Ger-man forces "could
well
takepart" in any peacekeeping inIraq.Rice and Secretary of StateColin Powell, pushing the ad-ministration's case in a roundof appearances on the Sundaymorning television newsshows, rejected the French-German proposal. Powell calledit "a diversion, not a solution.""The issue is not more in-spectors. The issue is compli-ance on the part of SaddamHussein,"
Powell said
on
NBC's"Meet the Press."Also Sunday, Russian
Presi-I
dent Vladimir Putin after ameeting
with
German Chancel-lor Gerhard Schroeder in Ber-lin said he supported a peace-ful disarmament and saw noreason for using military forceagainst Iraq.
1
Greenspan warns againstletting deficit
get?
too high
Finalists in Ground Zero
design*
picked
By Ken
Moritsugu
Knight
Ridder NewspapersWASHINGTON FederalReserve Chairman AlanGreenspan weighed into thedebate over President Bush'sproposed tax cut Tuesday,voicing concern about the ris-ing federal budget deficit andquestioning the need for anew economic
stimulus
pack-
age.
;
He also surprised some an-alysts with a cautiously
up-
beat assessment of the U.S.economy's prospects, thoughhe said that fears of war withIraq make it difficult
to
gaugethe economy's underlyinghealth.Greenspan's testimony tothe Senate Banking Commit-tee is likely to
bolster
Demo-cratic opposition to Bush's)proposal to reduce taxes toboost economic growth.Bush shocked many lawmak-ers and analysts last weekwhen he unveiled a tax cut
and
budget proposal
that
his
administration estimates willpush up the annual deficit to$300 billion.
;
:
|
Greenspan avoided
direct
criticism of Bush's proposal.In
fact,
he endorsed the cen-terpiece of the tax cut pack-
age,
the proposed
elimination
Alan Greenspan
of
the
tax
on dividend paymentsto investors. But he said thatsuch a step should be takenonly in conjunction with othersteps that would offset the lossin
tax
revenue. More generally,he warned
that
budget con-straints would force Congressto make difficult choicesamong a bevy of otherwisemeritorious tax cut and spend-
ing
proposals
in
the years ahead"The trouble
is
that when you
add
them
ail
up,
they come to aal larger than
the fiscal ca-pacity
of the country," he said."We ought
to
be ...very care-ful not to
allow
deficits to getout of hand," he added, warn-ing
that
a
growing
retiree pop-ulation means
the
federal
gov-ernment will face soaring So-cial Security and Medicarecosts
in
about a decade.
A
budget deficit
of
$ 100
bil-lion
to
$200 bil
lion
is
manage-able,Greenspan said, imply-ing that anything larger risksa dangerous hike in the feder-al government's debt."A rise in the debt increasesthe amount of interest pay-ments, which in turn increas-es the debt still further, andthere
is
an accelerating patternafter you reach a certain
point
 of
no
return," he said.Some tax-cut supporters saybudget deficits aren't impor-tant. They dismiss the argu-ment that deficits push up
long-term
interest
rates,
there-by harming economic growth.Instead, they say tax cuts
will
promote economicgrowth and that
a
strong
econ-omy
is the key factor in
gen-erating
budget surpluses.Greenspan, a leadingpropo-nent of President Clinton'sdeficit-reduction strategy
in
the 1990s, flatly rejected
the
conservative arguments."There is no question that ifdeficits go up, contrary towhat some have said, it doesaffect long-term interest rates,]it
does
have
a
negative
impact
on the economy," he
said.
"Faster economic growth,doubtless, would
make
deficitsfar easier to contain, but
fast-er
economic growth
alone is
not likely to be the full solu-tion to currently
projected
long-term deficits," he added.
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By Larry Fish
Knight
Ridder NewspapersNEW
YORK
From nine eye-popping designs unveiled inDecember, the agency respon-sible for redeveloping
the
WorldTrade Center site Tuesday nar-rowed the field to two, either
ol
which calls for putting up
the
tallest structure
in the
world.The two radically differentdesigns will be on display andopen to public comment untilthe end of
the
month, when the
Lower
Manhattan DevelopmentCorp. will select one as leadarchitect for the site. There isstill no guarantee that either
de-
sign will actually be built.
The
two finalists are an in-ternational team led by Rafael
Vinoly,
who designed Philadel-phia's
Kimmel
Center, with aproposal for two latticeworktowers that would house con-cert halls, playhouses and oth-er cultural venues; and DanielLibeskind, whose design would
I
include far more commercialspace but preserves the 70-foot-deep foundation as a me-morial to
the
more than
2,800
people
killed in
the
2001
terror-ist
attack
that destroyed thetrade center.
The
Libeskind
plan
is
designedso that on each Sept.
11,
at
themoment that the first plane hit,the sun would shine on the spotwhere
the
first tower stood.Officials of the
redevelop-ment
agency insisted that oneor the other design would even-tually give New York's skylinethe dramatic punctuation pointspreviously provided by the
110-
story twin towers."Rest assured, the core
idea
of the
plan
will be preserved"no matter how much futurepressures force changes in thewinning design, said RolandBelts, board member of the
agency.But
Bctts'
confidence is notuniversal.
Larry A. Silverstein,leaseholder for the commercialspace on the site, wrote theagency lastwee!complaining
that
he had been
lefX
out of theprocess and
demanding that all
10 million
square
feet of
office
space lost in
the
attacks
be re-stored.
Neither
finalist's design in-
cludes that
much office space,
World Trade Center finalists
TWo proposals
are
 btm
chosen w
lnafets
 by Ihe mn nbiDflrtgIhe site erf N«wYcfk City's dostroywlWodd Trad
Q
Cerrtortowen.
THINK
team*
Studio Daniel
Libeskind
Team led by New Yblttarchitects Rafael
Vfinoty,
Fredefe Scfwarti
-1,603 ft.
(SOT m) tall
Lattc*
around space WorM
Trad*
Censer occupied R
U.S.aretilted,
designedJewish Museum
In
Berfrt
Bulkfingi with
1,776
ft
(54lm)8(*et
ffifi
Each yeer on
Sep!
11,
sun
wH shine drecsy Into d&ep wells|
KRTThe two potential designs to replace the World TradeCenter towers.
and most consider that NewYork's soft real estate marketcould not absorb it anyway.No detailed cost
estimates
were attached to the plans.It is not yet clear whether Sil-verstein or the Lower Manhat-tan Development Corp, actual-ly has the upper
hand
in deter-mining what
will
be
built
on
theI
site.
Although both designs call fora memorial to those killed onSept.
11,
neither includes a spe-
cific
plan for one. A competi-tion to
design a memorial that
will begin later
this
month, oncean architectural
team
is
chosen.Architectural critics have alsocontended
that
the commission
has
run
the
process backward;Usually, architects
have
known
how many square
feet of
of-fice,
relai
1
and
residential
spacethey
are
to
include.
In
this
case,
they were
invited to draw up
ideas largely
free of
those
con-straints.
The
design from
Vinoly's
group, called THINK,
calls fortwo
1
,665-foot-tall
latticework
towers, which some
have com-pared to the
Eiffel
Tower
or
a
construction
ol
Tinker
TOYS
1
lie
design
would
i
nclude about
2
million square feet of officespace. The latticework struc-tures would be built above and
around
the footprints of thetrade towers but would
not
touch
them.
Libeskind's
design includes atower that would soar to
1,776
feet and feature a memorialspace on which sunlight wouldshine
each
Sept.
11
between8:46 a.m. _
marking
the mo-ment the
 first
 hijacked plane hitthe
 first
rade tower
;;
and 10:28a.m., the moment
the
secondtower
collapsed.
Currently, the world's tallest
buildings
are
the
1,483-foot
Pet-
ronas Twin
Towers in
Malay-sia. The
World Trade
Center
towers were
1,350
feet tall.
\\
Officials
made clear
that
both
finalist choices
were made al
ter
input
from
the public in theweeks
since
the
initial designs
were announced.
Libeskind
and
Vinoly
bothspoke
briefly at Tuesday's an-nouncement, and
thanked the
redevelopment
agency for
se-lecting their designs
for
further
consideration.
"It's
something that we nev-er
expected to
be
blessed
with" Vinoly said.
 
FEBRUARY
13,2003THEMERCIAD
PAGE 3
To contact
NEWS
Planting
the
jseeds
for
summer
What
students
need
to do
to
prepare
for
a
ob
By Kristin
PtirdyEditor-in-Chief
*
Even though the end ofschool is less than
100
days
'-away,
the next three and a halfmonths is a crucial planning I
•time
if you are
considering
|summer
employment,
an
intern-ship, a full time job or volun-
teering.
Bob
Hvezda,
Director of Ca-
rreer
Services, has been fillinghis appointment book latelyWith students preparing for
their |
,future, whether it is next se-mester, during the summer
or|
a few years away."Looking for
a
job is almost
like having
a part-time ob,'*
said
Hvezda. For those serious
'.about
finding a job right
for^|
-them,
research
and planning
areessential for a successful ex-perience.* For students who have not
'begun
to start looking for work,
*he
offers plenty of advice onhow to start looking, where to"look, what to prepare, and howto do it all.Many businesses that offer'internships have already begun
fhe
search for prospective stu-dents. To get started, studentsshould refer
to
their professors,
r .
advisors, and the Career Cen-ter about businesses and com-panies that may be suitable for
their
interests.In addition to knowing whatfield you would like to internin, choosing a location or a
handful
of locations will helpnarrow down your search. Ifconsidering relocating to
a
cityoutside of Erie, contact the arearcolleges' Career Service offic-
J
Within Hew weeks;
a
nation-al summer job bulletin board
.
Police andSafety Log
Jan. 18.20033810 Briggs Ave.Underage
drinking,
opencontainersJan. 19.2003
3943
Lewis Ave.Visiting student
charged
with
underage
drinking.
E.41'
1
St. 500 BlockUnderage
drinking,
failure
to
comply with officers.Egan
Hall
CafeteriaTheft of coat
Jan.
23.2003McAuley Hall | a
Possession and growing ofmarijuana.
Jan.
25.2003Lot
#22
Failure to comply
withofficers
while
driving.
3925
Lewis Ave.
Theft—money
stolen fromvisiting student while atparty.
?6
r
2003
East
Duval
Possession of weapons
and
drug paraphernalia
Tan.
30.2003
Maintenance Building
Truck was
keyed
in
lot.
1
Lot
#
4
:i
Verbal abuse by student,failure
to
produceID,disorderly conduct in parkinglot
?
Egan
HaU
CafeteriaForgery of
ID to
read
21
years
of
age.3829
Briggs
Ave.Furnishing of alcohol tonderage recruits.
[•act
ice Room 26Criminal
mischief
to
door.
uPwill be put up near the CareerCenter, with additional informa-tion available in
its
office.In addition,
a job
fair bulle-tin board
will be
posted outsideof 204 Old Main. Attendingthese job
fairs
is a greatre-source,
as more
and
more
com-panies are participating in jobfairs to save money on recruit-ing expenses.Plus,you will beable to meet more
company
representatives in a shortamount of time.
A
ob fair
in
Monroeville, Pa.will be featuring
110
employ-ers with a registration fee ofonly $5. Students who are in-terested should contact FrankRizzone at ext. 2424 for
fur-
ther information.Here are several resources to
search in order to get a headstart on
a job
search:Job fairs
I
Chamber of CommercewebsitesThe Yellow PagesClassified ads
[
Family, friends, profes-sionals in your fieldHvezda discourages dot comjob websites such asMonster.com.Often, these jobwebsites are
difficult
to findexactly what you are lookingfor in your desired location.Focus on your resources athand as well as local employ-ment publications.Spring break is a good timeto do networking people youknow about how to get experi-ence in your area of study. Ifyou have already sent out yourapplication materials,
the
breakin between semesters is alsoideal for setting
up>
interviews.
Once^ou
have picked out atleast
three
possibilities,
call the
ti
Lookingfor a ob
is
almost likehaving apart-time
job.
33
Jody MeHoWeraad
photographer
-Bob
Hvezda
company and ask the humanresources department who tosend a professional letter ofemploymentto.Mail
a
resume,or
e-mail
it along with samplesof your work and letters of rec-ommendation. Be prepared foropportunities with a portfoliofull of good papers, awards,letters of recommendation, andsamples of your work. Followup a week later with a confir-mation call to ensure your ma-terials arrived.A cover letter and a resumeare a start to getting the atten-tion of
an
employer, but in or-der to be competitive, studentshave
to be able to
market them-selves, said
Hvezda.
In
additiondocumentation of your experi-
ence
and qualification
is
an im-portant asset to demonstratethat you
are
capable of any job.The summer offers time offfrom school and the opportu-nity to make money, whichsome students rely on to payfor their education. For thosestudents who cannot make thecommitment
to
anotherob,theoption to volunteer
is sti 11
open
Robert Hvezda
for consideration. Whether youdonate four or
10
hours
a
weekto a law
firm,
food cupboard,
Or human
service organization,the experience is a great addi-tion to a resume.
"[The
Career Center] willplace students in internships
until
Memorial
Day,"
said
Hvez-
da. There is plenty of time tofind
an internship but the
soon-
er you begin to look, the more
likely you
are
to
land somethingyou can learn from and enjoy.
For more
infor-
mationfaboutspecific
assis-tance
from
Career| Services, 1visit Main 201
orl
call ext. 2426 or
2427.
Mercyhurst's
ethnic diversity
3500
1
300025002000
15001000
500
0
Various Races
*
Black Caucasian
(Not Hispanic)Hispanic
Unknown
The
male and
female population of
both
Mercyhurst campuses Is
over-
whelmingly
Caucasian
for
both
males
and
females combined. There are
1177
Caucasian males
and 1967
Caucasian females.
The
lowest ethnicpopulation was Hispanic, with
19
males
and 18
females.
Aside
fromCaucasians
f
Blacks were
had
the second highest population density atMercyhurst with
66
Black males
and 58
Black females.
I
Attention Students!!
$
Deadline for
filing for financial
aid
for
all students isMarch
15,2003 1
|Are you ready?All students who intend to return to Mercyhurst
for
the 2003-2004academic year
must file
paperwork with the Financial Aid
office
nolater than March 15th.Allforms,along with tips
for
filing,
car\
be
found on
the StudentFinancial
Services
web page located at
|
for
additional
information
regarding this deadline in the mail
and
your Mercyhurst
e-mail
accounts.
Interface: Science
a%our?fingertips
Complied
by Megan
FialkovichContributing
writer
Canberra, Australia: Hypo-chondriacs and
critter-phobesmay want to skip
over
this
sec-tion:
At the
second
Internation-
al Rodent Biology and Man-agement Conference, to
vhich my
invitation was trag-ically lost
in
the mail,
special-
ists pointed to common ratsas the source
of|.
infectiousdisease
pandemics
in the nearfuture. Historically, they havebeen
carriers
of the BlackDeath (bubonic plague),
E.coli,
dysentar
y, cholera,
rabiesand numerous tropical diseas-es while on-board ships.
They
have been found to harbor 70known diseases, with
AIDS
being one of the few excep-tions.While human populations
may
be growing out of hand,considerthis:for every humanborn every day, there are
10
rats; that makes four millionacross the planet, roughly. Inthe short, tough
lives
of theserodents, they scavenge almostindiscriminately, acting main-ly as pests and petri
dishes
with legs.
{Source:
Reuters)
Guangdong Province, Chi-na: While
we're
on the sub-
ject
of epidemics,
the
Chinese
Health
Ministry
claims that
the
"unidentified"
viral strain ofpneumonia which has
killed
five and hospitalized over 300near
Hong Kong is
'Hinder con-trol.*' The densely-populatedPeople's Republic neared ca-lamity earlier this week as re*
ports
exaggerating
the
situation"
abounded, creating a rush forwhite vinegar (useful for dis-infecting) and antibiotics
(which cannot
treat viral infec-tions, but stave off furtherbacterial infection).The geographic concentra-tion of
he
unknown contagionwas the main cause for con-
cern,
more so than the num-bers themselves.
(Source:AP)
1984?:Iowa-based neurosci-entist Lawrence Farwell holds
out hope
for
a new
crime-solv-ing technique called, in whatwill
soon
become
CSI
lexicon,"brain fingerprinting."The technique measures
in-
voluntary electric impulses inthe brain, which are emitted
when the brain recognizes
spe-cific visual
stimuli,
such as the
face of
a
missing child, withan EEG The brain waves be-ing measured last from 300-
500
milliseconds,
and Farwellhimself
has
developed a meth-
od
of detecting
impulses
up to1200 ms. He insists that theinnocent will register no rec-ognition of incriminating de-tails;
however,
no
criminal de-tection method is
fool-proof.
Seasoned
criminals are able
totest around
polygraphs,
and ittakes time for a new concept
to become admissible in court
Farwell remains diligent; he
has
headed Brain Fingerprint-ing Laboratories, Inc. in
Fair-field,
Iowa, for the past
12
years,and has had guardedsuccess with several cases.
Farwell
used brain fingerprint-ing to solve a 15-year-oldmurder by showing the sus-pect photographs of he crimescene, personal
items
 from
hevictim and wound patterns onthe body, which invoked
thesame
involuntarily
"tattling"
on
the EEG
||1
The man confessed to thatand three other murders, andis currently serving a life sen-tence. A landmark case using
Farwell's
technique to exon-erate a convicted murderer iscurrently
in the
Iowa SupremeCourt,?;
KRT
J2,000
pieces of wreck*age from the
Columbia
-have been recovered.
Fort
Worth,TX:
NASA
offi-cials have thus far gathered12,000 pieces of wreckageand debris from the lost Co-lumbia shuttle, largely thanks
to
cooperation
 from
 citizens
of
Texas and Louisiana.
The
ma-terial from the
STS-107
wasfound scattered over a 500-
mile
radius.In Mission Control's 26*Status Report on
the
on-going
investigation,
no
prevalentthe-ories have been forwarded,
but an
independent committee,
CAIB
(Columbia Accident
In-
vestigation Board), has beenappointed to oversee the pro-ceedings. Most of the
investi-
gation
will
focus on the enig-matic umbrella term
"Proba-
bility Risk Assessment."Meanwhile, the Expedition 6team continues expansion of
the
International Space
Station,
complete with a two-way au-
dio and video
feed early Tues-day morning on
NASA
TV.
(Source:nasa.gov) 
WANTED
Persons
with:
Sinus Infections, BronchitisCoughing
No insurance?Underinsured?No family doctor?Listen!
You may qualify
to participate in anew drug study.
You
get
free
examinations,
free
antibiotics,and compensation
for
being
a
participant.Call
immediately,
if you have the symptomsabove.Beata Clinical Research
Services
814-397-3700email questions tobeata.crs@starkfirm.com 
!

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