Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, May 1, 2003

The Merciad, May 1, 2003

Ratings: (0)|Views: 17 |Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, May 1, 2003
The Merciad, May 1, 2003

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 27, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/12/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929Vol! 76 No. 21
M«sftrtrhur9t
College
501
E.
38$h£StfErie lajl6546
News
Mercyhurst receives a
51 percent
increase in
ilumni
gifts for
2001
-
2002.I
pmion
Josh West's "Quo-tation Marks" dis-cusses the
benefits
of college withoutregrets.
Page
3
A&E
Confidence' continueso run high at the
box
office.
'age
4[Joan
of
Arc: Should we
>urn
them
at
the stake?
age
5
iFeatures
Senior
HockeyPlayer CJ Irelandfeatured in SportsIllustrated
Page
6
Sports
(Club
Hockeyreceives
awardsage
7
vlen's
lacrosse earns
bid
to Final Four.
age
8
**
Bulletin BoardMay
1
-
Bake sale in the Zurn
lobby, first floorMay
1
-Career
Services
Seminar:
So
You
Want
A Job At Graduation? in Main 206
 from
 3:30-4:30
DJTL
." ...
May 1
-
Pax Christi meeting in Main
207
 from
 8-9:30p.m.
§ T f j
May
2
- Lil'
Sibs
Weekend^
May 2 - Cookout in
Garvey
Park at 7
p.m.
May 2
-
Drive-in movie in
Munson
Plaza at 9
p.m. in
May 3 -Rotaract Club's 5K
walk/run. Register
in Baldwin Hall parking lot at
8:30
a.m.
May 3
-
I nflatable
run in Garvey
Park at 1
p.m.
May 3
-
S'
mores and more
in
the
Union at
10
p.m.
May 7
-
'The
Pianist'
 film
n
the PAC at 8
p.m.
1
ndex|
News
1
News
2
Opinion
3
A & E.
4
A &E
5
Features
6
Sports
7
Sports
8
Mercyhurst College celebrated Earth Day 2003
File
photo
Mercyhurst
stu-
dents pitch In forEarth Day eventsto show that theycare for the
enviorment
atMercyhurst
Col-
lege and around
Erie.
(Above)Students
help
outat
Trail
Day at theGlinodo Center.(Right) Sopho-mores LaurenZaun and NateLewis
help to
pre-pare trails for thesummer
season.
File
photo
By Kelly Rose
Duttfne
News EditorStudent leadership, dedication andconcern for
the
environment helpedto make the
2003
Earth Day activi-ties at Mercyhurst College a suc-cess.Earth Day, which was first cele-brated in 1970, was observed on
Mercyhurst's
campus on April 22,but activities throughout April andMay celebrate the earth and bringawareness to the Mercyhurst com-munity about erosion of the earth'sresources, pollution of
air,
water
and
soil; destruction of habitats; anddecimation of hundreds of thou-sands of species of plants and ani-mals.!
?;
ercyhurst students were in-volved
with
planning
the
events forEarth Day and many students par-ticipated in the events throughoutthe month of April. The events fo-cused on solutions to some of theworld environmental troubles andproblems right in Erie.
One unique
Earth
Day
activity for2003 was a letter writing campaignto stop weakening the Clean Water
Act,
which
is one
of America's mostimportant environmental laws.Another
way the
college celebrat-ed Earth Day and protecting theenvironment was through the windpower
market.
In
a
landmark deci-sion, Mercyhurst announced that itwill acquire
10
percent of its elec-tricity from wind power throughCommunity Energy Inc. This per-centage represents the largest com-mitment to wind power among col-leges and universities in the state,tied only with Chatham College.Tom' Billingsley, executive vicepresident for administration, an-nounced the five-yeai agreement,which
was effective
April1."Windresources represent a clean sourceof renewable energy technologyand Mercyhurst is committed totaking the steps necessary to pro-tect our environment and encour-age sustainable development," saidBillingsley.
L£
AS
a
wind energy consumer, Mer-cyhurst will pay $14,000 more ayear for its electricity but, from anenvironmental standpoint, the sav-ings are enormous, Billingsley not-ed.
Fori
instance,in securing 10percent of
its
electricity from windpower, Mercyhurst
will
reduce by580,560 pounds annually theamount of coal burned to produce
its
electricity.
It will reduce by
morethan a million pounds carbon diox-ide emissions, a greenhouse gasimplicated
in global climate
change;7,180 pounds of sulfur dioxide,which contributes to acid rain; and
2,338
pounds in nitrogen oxides,which contribute to ground-levelozone and smog.Mercyhurst students participatedin a variety of events to celebrateEarth
Day and help the
environment.Students helped
to
prepare trains forthe
summei
season in
Glinodo
onApril 12. Students also helped toplant trees on campus under
the
di-rection of Dr. Chris Magoc. Thelarge trees were planted on the"Mercy Walkway" leading up
to
Mercyhurst Prep** Many studentsparticipated
in the
third annual MillCreek Cleanup. The event was or-ganized by Nevin
Welte
and MattGoodrich,:Senior Kate
Cywinski
participat-ed
in the Mill
Creek Cleanup for
the
third year. "1 can see a lot of im-provement in the cleanup every
year,'*
Cywinsk
i said. "This yearwe collected more bags of recycla-
bles
than trash," said Cywinski,"which was great." Junior
Stephanie Davison was
surprised
by
the amount of work that needed tobe done, but Mercyhurst studentsthat attended noticed a real change
in the
area
after they were
finished.Stephanie Davison also helpedwith the letter writing campaign to
the
Environmental Protection Agen-cy. The letters were written byMercyhurst students in response tothe Clean Water Act.
-'The
letterwriting went very well," said Davi-son. "Many
people added their
per-
sonal opinions and notes to the let-ters, which will help to the CleanWater Act," she added.All Earth Day celebration eventswere sponsored by MercyhurstGreen, SPAN, Campus Ministry,Service Learning, Mercyhurst
Prep
AWARE, Glinodo Center and the
Partnership
for
a
Healthy
Mil I
CreekWatershed.
4 v
Are you interested in helping theenvironment but missed the EarthDay events on campus? Trash toTreasure, an event taking place onMay
18-May
26 will be in need of
student
help.Students
wi 11
be able
to
deposit non-perishable, unopenedfood and clothing in designated lo-cations
as
they pack
up
for
the
sum-mer.Junior Stephanie Davison had theidea after visiting her sister's col-lege. "I was disgusted with thewaste here at Mercyhurst," Davi-son
said.
"Campus ministry
is
help-ing me and we are excited for stu-dents
to be able to recycle their
foodand clothes
to
people who need it,"added Davison. Everything will bedelivered
to
Erie's under-privilegedand saved from taking up space ina landfill. Call
Stephanie
Davisonat ext 3754 to help.
Maya,
2003
Roth
toleave
'Hurst
By Kelly Rose DuttineNews Editor
Dr.
Andrew Roth
File
photo
Mercyhurst College will lose oneof its administrators at the end ofthis term. Dr. Andrew Roth hasbeen appointed as the President ofNotre
Dame
College of Ohio, locat-ed
in
South Euclid. Roth will beginhis term as Notre Dame College's
13
th
president on July 1,
2003.
|
Notre Dame College is a coedu-cational career-oriented liberal artsinstitu-t i o
nlwhichhas
about
1200
stu-dents.It is aCatho-lic insti-tutionin thetradi-tion
of
the Sis-
1
ters
of
f
Notre Dame, with
a
mission
to
edu-cate a diverse population in the lib-eral arts for personal, professionaland global responsibility.Roth joined the Mercyhurst Col-
lege
community
in
1974, as
a
mem-ber of the English department In1977, he founded the Communica-tion department and also served asits director. Dr. Roth founded anddirected the "Summer on the Hill"program at Mercyhurst and alsofounded the women's soccer pro-gram in 1986. Roth also served as
the dean
of enrollment
and
vicepres-ident of enrollment
and
informationsystems and taught strategic plan-ning, marketing and managementcourses in the business school.Currently, Roth serves as vicepresident of academic affairs anddean of Mercyhurst College.Roth earned his Bachelor of Artsdegree
at
John Carroll University
in
English. He earned his Master ofArts degree
 from
 Case Western Re-serve.
He also
received
his
M.B.A.in marketing from Gannon
Univer-
sity. Roth completed his doctorate
in
higher education and public poli-cy
 from
he
State
University of NewYork at Buffalo.The Mercyhurst community isgrateful for Roth's 29 years as aprofessor and administrator. Wewish him luck at Notre Dame Col-lege of Ohio.
ProfessorAppointed
Mercyhurst mathematics profes-sor Dr. Donald Platte was appoint-ed governor of he Allegheny Moun-tain section of he Mathematical
As-
sociation of America during its an-nual meeting
April
4-5
at Penn
StateDuBois.Platte also was reelected as coor-dinator of the mathematics short-course held annually at AlleghenyCollege.Meanwhile, accompanying Platteto the meeting were
Dr.
Chad Red-mond, associate professor of math-ematics, assistant professors Patrick
Kelly and Michael R
utter,
and
major *Lukasz Karapuda.
Information from MondayMorning
 
PAGE 2THE
MERCIAD MAY
1,2002
NEWS
To
contact:
Bush calls on Congress to
pass
his global AIDSinitiative
By Diego Ibarguen and Jim PuzzangiteraKnight
Ridder
NewspapersWASHINGTON
-
Calling it
a "moral
impera-tive,*'President
Bush on Tuesday
called
on
Con-
gress to
quickly pass
his global AIDS
initiative,a
$15
billion effort to stem the spread of thedeadly virus that afflicts 42 million peopleworldwide.The measure, which Bush proposed in Janu-ary, has been held up by- lawmakers hagglingover whether to emphasize sexual abstinenceover other disease-prevention methods andwhether to explicitly
restrict
r.funding
fromgroups that promote abortion."Time
is
not
on our
side,*'
Bush told
hundredsof
people
in the White House East Room. Hesaid that in the three months since he had an-nounced
his
initiative,
760,000 people had
diedfrom
AIDS,
1.2 million more had become in-fected and
more
than
175,000
babies
were
bornwith it.Bush said he hoped
Congress
would
pass the
bill before the current four-week legislative
ses-
sion ends. The House of Representatives couldvote as early as Thursday.f
President George W. Bush speaks at theWhite House on Tuesday, April 29, 2003,
urging Congress to pass an emergency plan
to help fight
AIDS
around the world.
U.S.
to remove almost alltroops
from
Saudi Arabia
By Dave MontgomeryKnight Ridder NewspapersRIYADH, Saudi Arabia - U.S. military per-sonnel have begun to withdraw from SaudiArabia
as
part of a redeployment of America'sforces in the Persian
Gulf,
Defense SecretaryDonald H. Rumsfeld announced Tuesday.*Most U.S. forces at Saudi Arabia's PrinceSultan Air Base will be gone by August, mem-bers of Rumsfeld's entourage said. The alliedair command, headed by Lt. Gen.'T. MichaelMoseley,moved
 from
 Prince Sultan
to
Qatar's
al
Udeid air base Monday.The decade-long presence of American forc-es in this conservative
Islamic
kingdom hasbeen a source of discomfort to Saudi Arabia'sruling monarchy, particularly after the U.S.-
led
war against Iraq, which the Arab worldwidely opposed.
Experts divided
on
howpervasive
SARS
will become
By Seth BorensteinKnight Ridder NewspapersWASHINGTON
-
International
health
experts
are
grappling
with a life-and-death
question: Canthe rest of the world breathe easily if
SARS
iscontrolled everywhere but mainland China?No one knows for certain.
There
are still toomany unknowns about severe acute respirato-ry syndrome,
the'sometimes
fatal flu-like ill-ness that has infected
5,473
people
worldwide
in recent weeks,
killing
353.
To date
52
proba-ble cases have been identified in the
United
States, but no deaths.One pessimistic view sees SARS spreadingagain as soon
as
another infected
person
leavesChina. Others say massive efforts to monitortravelers' health combined with
more
vigilancein treating sick travelers are
sufficient
safe-guards to contain and prevent new outbreaks.
An Israeli public health nurse measures
the body temperature
of
a
passenger after
he landed in Israel from
Toronto, Canada,
on
Tuesday
April
29,2003. Israel's healthministry
decided
to check passengers forthe 8ARS virus immediately upon theirarrival from a country considered to behigh-risk.
v**
u
rv
•,>
t
<<
4t.
r
**-
11
I
SI
*m^
;
*«^%-
^
S
<&.
A-
'w
!«*'
1\\
\
.V
Sandra Long, from left, StephanieShumway, Jake Fullwood and LyndseySchroeder, shown April 20, 2003, inCollege Station, Texas, have all receivedjob offers before graduation from theTexas
A&M
Center for Retailing Studies.
Center is one of the
few
in
U.S.
preparing students torun stores
By Maria HalkiasThe Dallas Morning NewsCOLLEGE STATION, Texas - Why wouldanyone get a college degree to work in a store,only to log long hours for low pay?In a few weeks, the Livingston, Texas, na-tive, who covered her college costs working atThe Gap, will be among students graduatingfrom the university's Mays Business School.
About 25
of hem
will
receive
a rare
diploma
- a
Certificate
in
Retailing. *Retailers say the A&M students are amongthe most prepared graduates entering retail ca-reers,having completed a program
that's evolved
over 20 years into one of
the
best - if not thebest - retail schools among only a handful inthe nation.
|
"We don't recruit at any other college cam-
pus,"
said Kevin Puller, director of recruitingfor the Dallas-based Container Store.
H
don'tknow what they put in
the
water here, but theseseniors are gracious,
confident,
aggressive andwell-trained consistently year after year."The center's concentration in the discipline,from both academic and real-world perspec-tives, makes its graduates sought-after recruitsfor retailers' management tracks. But the un-certain economy has slowed even their job
us
year, along
with this
year's
1.3
m i I
lion other spring college graduates.
Ilraq
war coverage spursinterest in enlistment
By Edward
ColimoreKnight
Ridder Newspapers
PHILADELPHIA -
The media's coverage ofthe war in Iraq produced powerful images ofAmerica's military successes - and some greatrecruiting commercials.Twenty-four
hours a
day, seven days
a
week.
The
quick victory - and unforgettable pic-tures of the troops and Iraqis
toppling a
statueof Saddam Hussein - are helping recruiters fillthe ranks with more qualified soldiers.Across the country, recruiting stations aregetting more visits and more phone calls, andthe services'
Web sites
are receiving
more
hits.The military's conduct of
the
war
**was
oneof
the
reasons I decided
to
join," Randi Bar-nett,
anil
8-year-old
Levittown, Pa., residentand former
Neshaminy
High School student,said during
a
recent visit
to an Army
recruitingstation in Levittown."I want to help out.... I'm also looking it asa
career.'*?
Army
Capt.
Tony Barnett, commander of theNorth Philadelphia Recruiting Company
and no
relation to
the
recruit,
said
he
anticipated moretraffic. His company oversees recruiting inparts of
the
city and suburbs.
"I
think more people are interested becauseof our success, because of the positive im-pression they got from the embedded report-ers and the fact that we had so few casual-
ties,"
he said.
U.S. troops guard the National MuseumThursday,
April
17,2003, In Baghdad, Iraq.U.S. Success in
Iraq
results
In
more recrut-
ing.
Alumni
make
a difference
Alumni
donations
vault
6i
percent
in
2001
-2002
Jody Mello/Merciad
photographer
Gracious alumni donations to
Mercy
hurst
College
helped to
build
the
Hlrt
AcademicCenter. Mercyhurst has seen a
61
percent increase in donations, when the nationaltrend fell over 13 percent.
*
Special to
The Merciad
Fundraisers in higher educa-tion
have
heard
the refrain
moretimes than they care to count:"Sorry, not this year."A listless economy and risingunemployment are not condu-cive to securing charitable con-tributions, according
to a
recent
Council
for Aid to Educationstudy which shows a substan-tial decline in alumni giving in2001-02 for the first time in
15
years.Although the
decline
for col-lege overall giving was a slight1.2 percent, hardest hit was
alumni
donations, historically thecornerstone of private support,which fell
13.6
percent,
the
firstdrop since the
mid-1970s
and
those declines were five
percentor less.At Mercyhurst, the scenariofor alumni giving is markedly
different,
said Gary Bukowski,CFRE
'73,
vice
president of in-stitutional advancement. Mer-cyhurst alumni gave at unprec-edented levels that caused a 61percent growth rate. In addi-tion,
alumni
participation
has
in-creased three
percent,
a key
sta-
tistic in the
U.S.
News and WorldReport's annual rankings
of col-leges. Mercyhurst College wasranked
12
th
for
L i beral Arts
Col-leges in the North for 2002, upfrom its
2001
raking of
15*
anda
19
th
ranking in the year 2000.
"Our alumni
have risen
to a
lev-
el
of giving never
experienced inthe
college's history," Bulkows-
ki
said.
"Mother
Borgia
Egan
would be proud of how thealumni body has stepped to theplate. Last year we received 49gifts from alumni that rangedfrom $1000 to $163,000, thelargest to date in that range.Mercyhurst students, facultyand administration appreciatedthe growing number of alumnidonations which add to educa-tion and the mission of Mercy-
hurst
College
and make the
edu-cation of many students possi-
ble.
V
S
St.f Joseph^ Universityaffirms offer to Santorum
By James M.
O'Neill
Knight Ridder NewspapersSt. Joseph's University trust-ees
Friday
reaffirmed
an
in vita-tion
to
embattled Sen.
Rick
San-torum to speak at commence-ment next month, despite oppo-sition from faculty and a rare
campus*protest
by students.About
125
students, along withseveral priests and faculty, pro-tested
silently on campus
Friday,holding signs that said "Not atmy graduation" and "SenatorSantorum
does not
represent thebest in us," as the trustees^ex-ecutive committee discussed
the
invitation
issued
back
in
Jan-uary and
an
honorary
degree
theschool plans to
bestow
on thesenator.Santorum, the third-rankingRepublican
in the
Senate, engen-dered controversy last weekwhen he equated gay sex withpolygamy, incest and
adultery
and called homosexuality anti-thetical to a healthy, stable, tra-ditional family."Santorum is Catholic, and hiscontroversial
comments seemed
to follow
Catholic
teaching. Thechurch teaches that gays shouldbe treated with respect, but that
homosexual acts are
"intrinsical-ly disordered" and morallywrong. In his controversial re-marks, Santorum said, "I haveno problem with homosexuali-ty. I have a problem with ho-mosexual
acts."!
Still, the protesters at
Si.
Jo-seph's,a Catholic institution,said
Santorum's
comments of-fended.
"He
does not seem torepresent
the values
of our uni-versity," said unior
Kera
Walter.
Many students at the JesuitUniversity
said class
discussionis routinely woven with lessonsabout the importance of socialjustice and of making the cam-
pus
welcoming
to all
people, nomatter their ethnicity or sexualorientation. They said San-
torum
*s comments did not re-flect that call
to
openness.Senior Guy Palumbo said that
while a
college
campus is meant
to foster an open exchange ofconflicting viewpoints, com-mencement is different. "Hav-ing an extremist
 from
he left orthe right speak and politicizecommencement is inappropri-
ate,"
he said.The Rev. H. Cornell Bradley,a Jesuit and campus minister,stood in solidarity with the stu-dents. "Graduation is
a
celebra-tion for
the
students,
and to have
a controversial speaker inter-feres with that," he said. "Theattention would be taken awayfrom
the
students' achieve-ment."St. Joseph's spokesman Jo-seph
Lunardi
emerged
 from
hetrustees' two-hour meeting, ac-knowledging the controversy
but saying the
trustees
chose not
to rescind
Santorum's
invita-tion.Lunardi said the trusteesthought they should
remain
con-sistent with the school's com-mitment to openness. "We'retrying to send a message that all
views
are
welcome
here, regard-
less
of heir popularity," Lunardisaid."This many not be a popularpath, but if
we
stand for toler-ance, we can't be intolerant ofanyone, and
we hope all involved
will keep
that*
in mind."The trustees
also
suggested in astatement that an academic
fo-
rum, rather than commence-ment, is the more appropriatesetting for public-policy debate.Santorum spokeswoman EricaClayton Wright said that San-torum was on a
^private
sched-
ule"
for the weekend, and thatshe could not comment on theSt. Joseph's decision.Top administrators at St. Jo-seph's generated a list of possi-ble graduation speakers earlierthis year, and
a
director of stu-dent life then polled some stu-dents about the
list.
An
Irish ten-or outpolled Santorum, but
when the
singer
was
unavailablefor the May
18
graduation, theinvitation
was
offered
to the
sen-ator.
Santorum*s
invitation generat-ed opposition even before hiscomments about gays. Earlierthis
semester^some
faculty ex-pressed their displeasure, argu-ing that
Santorum's
support forcapital punishment and for theIraq war clashed with Catholicteaching and Pope John
Paul II
sstatements on both issues.
 
MAY
1, 2003
THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
1
OPINION
Remembering j college High fidelity sinks
to new
low
without
the!
*what
ifs
YIt's
better to regret
something
you did than
something
you
didn
't
do.
"
Red
Hot
Chill Peppers
Quotation Marks
Josh
West
Show
me
somebody with noregrets and
IM1
show yousomebody who's really figuredout this whole life thing.But
let's
be
realistic.Everybody
has
regrets. Mostof
us
have plenty of
them.
*
It doesn't mean that you'vewasted your life away livingin a bubble; it just meansyou're human.Forget about trying to makeup for your past balks andscrew-ups.
^
Coming to terms with thefact that you never stood upto the fourth
grade.bully,
orchased down your firstunrequited love, are mattersthat you should deal with atyour next
A
A
meeting
or
with
the certified assistance of abest selling self-help book.In the meantime, we canfocus on the present.Falling into a rut is easy to
do.
especially around here./With so much nonsense tooccupy our time, it's nosurprise that so many of usend up looking back on ourcollege careers at Mercyhurstand wondering where the hellit all went.
When
you
look back
on
yourcollege experience, are yougoing
to be
satisfied?
.'What
will your collegememories be?Some us of will remember
an
epic
adventure, packed fullof
stories
that
will make
us
itch
with
anticipation of the daywhen our kids are old enoughfor
us
to tell 'em all about it
Others will recall
a
hunt
haze:a pathetic and depressing blurof classes, television and AIM.Most
will
be somewhere in'between. (College is packed full ofobligations.Most of us have schedulesthat hold
us
responsible for far
more
than just academics, be itpractice, work or whatever.All of that responsibility canbe a downright drag on what
are
supposed
to be the
best
and
wildest years of our lives.
Blow it all
off?
gp
That
might
be
a good idea onoccasion, but it's probably notin your best interest to make ita
habit.
One of the prerequisites forhaving a blast at college isactually staying
in
college.
Keeping your crap
together iskey unless you really want tocut loose and
go
romp about inthe real world.
Lots
of
people
say
that
collegeis a waste of their time, butrarely do you see them justpack up and get the hell out.So unless you decide to roll
out
of
here without
ever lookingback, that leaves you right
where
you
started:
Mercyhurst.College is what you make ofit, wherever you are.Plenty will spend four yearshere, bitching that they never
had the
great times
they alwaysexpected.Fun and adventure generallyhang out right under our nosesand are
 ripe
or the picking by
anyone
willing
to cut
loose
andgo for it.Sure, throwing
yourself
outthere is risky sometimes.Whether you're going after
the
cutie
in the
corner,
throwinga party or jumping into thatGator idling next to themaintenance shed, there isalways the looming possibilityof
getting
burned.The thing to remember is"Who cares?"
1
Looking back,
isn't
it truethat your worst of mishapshave made the best of stories?
In
retrospect you mightdecide that
i
wasn't
in
the bestof taste to pour cafeteria soupall over your buddy, but damn- how funny
was
thatl
Nobody sits around drinkingbeers with their
 friends
alking
about
the
time
that they
almost
drove up to Canada instead ofgoing to class.Nobody wants to hear about
the time you
thought
about
streaking across the footballfield.Live your life in such a waythat people need to see it to
believe
it.Go the extra mile. Redefineyour limits.Have a blast and make noapologies for itGet silly. Get in a fight. Getthat girl
that always
caught your
eye.:.;
IIP
Now get going.
LETTERS
TOTHEJEDITOR:
Because I was involved inthe
decision
to
have
a
pre-film
announcement concerning[the movie screening at thePAC]
'Secretary,'
I
would liketo explain
why
this
announce-ment was made.Student attendance at theGuelcher
Film Series
has
been,
until recently, quite low.It is the outside community,many of us senior citizens,who have been the main sup-port of
this
series through theyears.
We are a
generation
that
was
brought
up
in
a
time
when
theblatant sexual openness of
to-
day's films was unacceptable.We are certainly matureenough to handle such open-ness, we just find that suchopenness is often of no artisticor redeeming value.|Shock value, perhaps, but intoo many films, often of no ar-tistic value.It was to this audience thatthe announcement was direct-ed.
r
I might add
that
to
equate
thefilms that have been presented
in the
past
to
being "cooking
in
JCosovo with
subtitles" displaysa high degree of sophomoresophistry.Some of
the
films, like theRussian
 films,
 have
been
poi-gnant; some like the Iranianfilms,
bitter-sweet;
like
'GazaStrip,' shocking and eye-opening; the Chinese orphanstory, heart-warming; and theartistry of the Japanese car-toon, awesome!Perhaps an appreciation ofthese films is where true ma-turity lies.
Dr.
Robert
T.
Guelcher,
M.D.
In the past several weeks, anumber of people
have
voiceddisapproval over
the
views
ex-
pressed
on
The
Merciad's
Opinion Page.This
is a
good
sign
I
means
people are reading the news-paper.
.,i
need to point
out,
howev-er, the difference between"news" and "opinion."
jl
News, as practiced by thenewspaper, is the attempt topresent information of valueand/or interest to our readers.Every effort
is'
made to in-
. ,.
f
.f'.v.--».
»
sure that the
* information is
dft
factual, relevant and present-ed in an objective
manner,
§
Opinion
is
something totally
different.
The articles on these pages
are
written
to
express
one
per-
son's
viewpoint—
a
subjectiveview of life on and off cam-
pus.
.'
We
make
the
pages
availableto students, faculty and staff
so
they
may
air
their
concerns,which
sometimes take
a
decid-edly unflattering look at
our
school and which sometimesmake others upset.Such views, as noted, arethose exclusively of the writer,and do not reflect the views of
the
newspaper's staffor
the
col
-lege.We
all
have opinions, andmost times, our opinions con-flict with others.Case
in
point:
Opinion editorPhil
Pirrello's
comments
in
the
March
20
issue of
The
Merciad
regarding the cautionary an-nouncement prior
to
the show-ing of a movie at the PAC.In his editorial, Mr. Pirrelloreflected his belief that collegestudents should have enoughmaturity
not to
be instructed asto what may or may not be of-fensive.
As
it
turns
out
the announce-ment was made for the benefitof
those
non-students in atten-dance
who may
have found
t
h
film
a bit
"rough"
for general
consumption.|
For that segment of the audi-ence, the announcement wasappropriate.
1
Mr. Pirrello wasexpressing the students' per-spective.
$;
He was voicing his opinionthat too often on campus, weeattempt to "shelter"
our stur
dents from certain informa-tion. This is exactly what our
Opinion pages
are
designed
to
do - give one person's opin-ion.Now, the PAC was perfect-ly within its right - and mayeven have felt obligated - toprovide the "cautionary an-nouncement" for audiencemembers.Conversely,
Mr
Pirrello
and
other students attending the
film
have the
 right
o
feel
of-fended
by the
announcement.In presenting the situationon our Opinion pages, we
were
not
attempting
to
explain
what happened,
that would
be
"news.*'
t
,
>||E
M
We presented how one ofthe attendees felt (that would
be
"opinion").
Opinions
are
meant
to
 rile
hespirit and get people interest-ed in voicing their own opin-ions.
§J
As such, our Opinion pagesseem to have done just that.
iDr.
Richard Welch,
advisor
to The
Merciad
Editor's
Note;
Due to
the
increase in student editorials appearing in thesepages,
1
would like to reiterate
that
any
opinion expressed via
a
letter to the editor is the sole
property
of its authors). |
These
letters
do
not reflect the views
of
The Merciad
Mm,
Mercyhurst, et al.
\
Also
any
and all opinions expressed on these pages are neither right nor
wrong--they
are opinions
and
should
be
taken as such. Thank you
and keep
the rants coming.
Have
college's
bar-lit encounters cheapened
romance?
Liquor has been a social lu-bricant
for
years.
K
So,
judging,by
the Weeklywalk of shames by many ahung over undergrad, onewould think that the issues of
love
and
romance
and
"commit-ment*'
would not be met with
heads held low
and
wearing lastnight's
outfit.
When
did
romance
become acommodity?When did the act of flirtingbecome a stratagem, a parryand joust between the sexes
that results into
one
of
wo
triv-
ial,
but nonetheless practical,things:
a
shoot-down
or a
hook-
up?
m
3P
Maybe it is spring fever, orthe last few weeks of collegeand the last three terms of
re-
grets adding up, but I feel a
sense
of
trite
desperation
in
theair;
a
desire to
find
someone to
have
and
discard
at
will just for
the
sake
of
having someone that
can
be
discarded at will.Everyonegripes,
either
in
ex-cessively long away messagesor drunken cell phone calls,about being alone or wantingsomeone to
make
breakfast forin the morning.Nothing worse then a lonelyapartment to come home to?But these persons who lookfor love, or gripe about lostchances for it, are the peoplewho forget that the best friendor
cuddle
buddy
they
complain
And Another Thing
Phi]
Pirrello
to are most likely more than
suitable
to
fill that
empty
spacein bed.So shut up.It's cynical and it's coarse,but it's true.;: |Romance, that tuning forkthat goes off in your chestwhen infatuation settles in, is,for the most
part,
a
pipe
dreamon college campuses.It ranks up there with suchcollegiate
truisms
as
"girls
lovethe
jerk"
and/or "mixed
drinksmake the lusting go longer."I've had the sweet and the
sour,
and as
'Vanilla
Sky'
says:
"The
sweet is never as sweetwithout the
sour."
It's taken
me
three I
ong
years
of
bending
my
friends'
ears
and
watching the probability of agood thing implode to realizethat there is a routine to thesweet and the sour.Every
month,
for
some
every
week,
there is
a
new proximity
infatuation*
A new eye-candy to brag to
the
roommates about
or to
pinefor when stumbling for thelight switch at the LonelyApartment.Expectations are lowered
-
you've grown tired of peoplebeing
unable
to
meet
them.
Drinks
are
made
and inhibi-tions are, for one
brief,
un-customary instant, let loose.
The
broken
idealist becomesthe aspiring player, the jerkhopefully
some
girl will wantto take home. And that mo-ment of swapping
self
forfalseness is, sadly, becomingcommon practice.Fidelity as social
entertain-
ment,
this cannot be the fu-ture. Can
it?"I
don't
make
the
rain.
I just
have
the
best
umbrella,"
quot-
ing another Cameron Crowemovie.
Its
sad that
others
 find
t sadthat I once prided myself
on
being a pragmatic optimist
with romantic
sensibilities.Now, it seems those virtuesare nothing in the wake of
come-on
lines,
impressive lies
and
really cool sound systems
in cars bought by mommyand daddy. *
Materialism
equals attrac-tive,honesty
is a
faux
pas and
the only comfort is that the
nice
guy still finishes last.Whoever said "looking forlove in all the wrong places"obviously had a
bachelor's
degree.
The
big question: What happens now?
As graduation looms,
ambiguity
about
career settles
in
At a recent appointment, mydentist asked me what I wasplanning on doing after gradu-
ation
My response was: "Crawlinto my bed, hide under theblankets and sob."The big unknown of whatcomes after college life can bequite intimidating, but no col-lege student can ignore it; nomatter how many Springmaidcomforters we may try to hideunder.It's that time of year again,kiddos,
when there
is one
ques-tion
on
every
upper
classmen'smind: What happens
now?
What to do, what to do?For juniors and seniors, thisis the time of
the
year that webegin to ponder our respectivefutures.Do we plunge headlong into
the
job
market?!Do we stay, for a while, withthat summer job that has beenso faithful to us?Do we continue on to highereducation, graduate school orbeyond?
The
options
are
numerous
and
each has its own benefits, but
how do we
make this
decision?How
do we
know what
is
right
for us?
But I
Could
Be
Wrong
JaimeRinne
The search for
the
right post-
col
lege
option is similar, inmany ways, to the collegesearch that many of us em-barked on three or four years
ago.
Ask
mom or dad and
they will
be sure to have an opinion, so
will
the career services stair,your professors and anyoneelse that knows of your plight.
They
all
have
opinions,
because
they have all been there
them-
selves.However, it is important tokeep in mind that they madethe decision that was right forthem, not
you
Just like you had to choosethe
 right
 college, you will also
have
to
choose
the
post-collegepath that is
 right
or you.
Are
you
happy
with
the
sum-
mer job
that you have held forthe past four years?My advice is to rememberthat there is a difference be-tween being happy some-
where
and
being
comfortablethere,
but,
for
all I
know,
youmay be perfectly content towork your way up the ranksat Toys-R-Us.Are there openings in thefield that you have beenstudying for all of your col-lege life and you just can'twait to get started?
Then,
byall means, swan
dive
into that
job
pool!Do you love to learn andwant
to
study
a
more
special-ized aspect of your major?
Then graduate school
may be
what's right for you.It's
a
daunting
task,
I
know,
but remember that no choiceis permanent.
I
f
you
stay with that sum-
mer job,
but after awhile de-cide that you would ratherpursue your Masters degree,then do it.But most of all do whatmakes you happy.This is what college hasbeen teaching you to do forfour years: make your owndecisions.
Good luck
and I
hope
to see
you on the other side.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->