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The Merciad, May 8, 2003

The Merciad, May 8, 2003

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The Merciad, May 8, 2003
The Merciad, May 8, 2003

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929
Voli 76
No. 22
Mercyhurs^College.S0l^438th*S#Efie
1*^16546
May&
2003
News
Breakdown of
Mercy
hurst students'intended fields
of
study
Page
2
am&jr
oour«« « Mudy]
T
ti
w
ft
I
Opinion
4
But I
Could
h
BeWrong' is right aboutstudent
involvement
oncampus.
Page
3
A&E
*X2'
Storms intotheaters.
Page
6
Features
Nevin
Welte
dives formussels in Delawareriver all summer.
Page
4.
Sports
Men's lacrosse teamplays
Kimestone
inthe Final
Four.
Page 8
.
Manchel namednew men's
basket-
ball coach.
Page
8
Bulleting
Board
May 8
-
Career
Services:
Seniors What to Dowith Career Services
Before
You
Leave! Seminar
in Main 206
rom
 3:30-4:30
p.m.
May 8
- Hidden
in
Plain
Sight:
Viewing and
discussion on the most recent documentary on
U.S.
policy in
Latin America in
Main 207 at
7:30
p.ITL
a.
May 8
-
Lecture
Series: "A View fromWashington"
in the PAC
 from
 8-10
p.m.
May 9
-
Spring Formal
May
10
-
Spring
FestMay
10
-
On-Campus Car Wash in themaintenance parking lot
 from
 10
a.m.
to 4
p.m.
May 10
-
Spring Vintage Fashion Show
forPromotion
in the Taylor
Little
Theatre at 7
p.m.May
14
-
'Rabbit^Proof
Fence*
 film
n the PACat 8
p.m.May
15
-
'Synaptic
Conondrum'
a
studentproduced
movie in the Walker Recital
Hal
I at 8
un.
Index
News
...1
News
2
Opinion
3
Features
4
Features
...»
5
A & E.
6
Sports
7
Sports
* 8
Roth to pursue new challenges
Dr.Roth
appointed President of Notre
Dame College
of
Ohio
By Kelly Rose
Duttine
News editorOn July 1, Dr. Andrew Roth willbecome the
13*
president of NotreDame College of
Ohio—a
collegethat is very much like Mercyhurst,
even down to the
beauty of
he
cam-
pus.
Roth said he is leaving Mer-cyhurst for an excellent opportuni-ty to be president at Notre DameCollege and for the challenge thatbeing president of a school willpresent for him.Dr. Roth feels that Notre DameCollege of
Ohio
has similarities toMercyhurst College.
"It is a
lot likeMercyhurst 25 or 30 years ago,"said Roth.
.Roth
feels that NotreDame College has a lot of
room
togrow and expand. "They recentlyincreased from 600 to 1,200 full-time students," said Roth, whoseplan for
the
college includes build-ing board relations, working with
fundraising
and
building
enrollmenteven more at the small college.The. past
president,
Dr. Anne
D em
-ing, is retiring after being presidentof the college since 1997. Rothhopes
mat he
will
be able to til I
Dem-
ing's
footprints, as she did an ex-cellent job as president, especiallywith board relations, according toRoth.
\
f
:
^Notre Dame
College
is also
anoth-
er Catholic
school,
like
Mercyhurst.The college is located in South Eu-
clid,
near
Cleveland,
and was
found-ed by the Sisters of Notre Dame.
•r
Roth said that
picking
another Cath-olic school was very important inhis job search and decision to pe-ruse a career as president. "Catho-lic schools are important becauseof
the
values that they live by andthe
values
they
help
students
to
dis-
cover," Roth stated.Roth looks forward to buildingenrollment at Notre Dame College."The college just became co-ed in
2001,"
saidRoth.Previously, "Lit-
tle Notre
Dame" had
been an all
girlsschool.Roth feels
like his experience with
Mercyhurst College
will help him at
Notre Dame College. "At Mercy-hurst, we have a very strong ad-missions department," said Roth.Roth feels
priv i leged to
have workedwith such a strong department atMercyhurst. "I plan on working toimprove admissions
at
Notre DameCollege,"
he
added.All of Roth's experiences at Mer-cyhurst
College'will benefit his
newrole as president at Notre; DameCollege. Roth prides himself onbeing a good teacher about any-thing. Roth was a full-time facultymember long before becoming anadministrator in 1974 and still en-joys teaching. "It
will
always be
the highpoint
of
my
Mercyhurst ca-reer," said Roth.Other highpoints include building
the
admissions department and fi-nancial aid opportunities at Mercy-
Filephoto
Dr. Andrew Roth will soon become the 13th President of NotreDame College of Ohio.
hurst. Roth feels that he has been
able to
work with
a
lot of high qual-ity people while at Mercyhurst,which has made
his
job easier.
.Another
highpoint of
his
Mercy-hurst career was founding thewomen's soccer team in
1986
andtaking them to
a
NCAA champion-ship.Dr. Roth said that he had no ideaor input about who will be takingover his position after
July
1.
Roih
would
like to
leave
the
Mer-cyhurst community with a chal-lenge
to
remember
the college
mot-
to,
Carpe Diem. "I believe that allsuccessful people live by this mot-to and that Mercyhurst was builton this feeling," said Roth. "We
always stress lessons
of service
and
community
to our
students,
but one
of the values of a Mercyhurst edu-cation is
learning to be
positive andunderstanding Carpe Diem," add-ed Roth.
j> | 1^Mercyhurst
College thanks Dr.Roth for his 29 years of service tothe Mercyhurst community andwishes him well as President ofNotre Dame College.
Tuition will increase to $23,394,
<?
6.71
percent rise
Special to The MerciadBeginning September of
2003,
stu-dents will see the cost for one yearat Mercyhurst College rise from
$21,924
to $23,394, an increase of6.71 percent.Despite the increased cost, Mer-cyhurst remains one of the lowestpriced private colleges
in the
regionand, last year rewarded
15 million
dollars
in
financial aid
to 92
percentof
its
students. This year, they ex-pect that number to climb to
17
million, according to Dr. AndrewRoth, vice president of academicaffairs. Some students also receivestate and federal aid, includingloans.
•A
:
Costs for the 2003-2004 academ-ic year include $15,780 for tuition,$6,414 for room and board and
$
1,200
in
fees.
The room
and boardcharge includes an annual $45 ca-ble fee per individual housing
unit,
a provision that was requested andapproved by the student govern-ment. Until recently, students mademonthly payments directly to thecable company, so the annual feerepresents a saving to them notedJane Kelsey, vice president of fi-nance and treasurer.The increases are necessary tocover financial aid to students, sal-aries and benefits for faculty andstaff and costs associated with ad-ditional housing
to
support the college's growing enrollment," saidKelsey.
t
*
Meanwhile,
a
comparison of Mer-cyhurst's top private competitorsshows costs at the Erie college arelower than others with the excep-tion of Grove City College. Forthe2002-2003 academic year, the av-erage annual cost among the 16peer institutions was
$23,920
withMercyhurst at $21,924.* Ohio
Jody
Mello/Mefaad
photographer
Tuition on Mercyhurst's campus will Increase to
$23,394
for next
year,
a6.71 percent increase
from
the 2002-2003 tuition.
Northern represented the high endat
$29,115
and Grove City, the low
end
at $13,402.'"Being one of the lower priced
colleges in the
region, coupled with
an aggressive
financial
aid
program,Mercyhurst College offers its stu-dents and their families
a
great val-
ue,"
said Roth. In effect, we offera high quality private education atnet prices competitive with stateinstitution charges."Meanwhile, charges increased4.88 percent at Mercyhurst North-east for the 2003-2004 academicyear, from $14,619 to $15,333.Not all students agree with Roththat Mercyhurst
is
offering a greatvalue. Many students are upsetwith the increased tuition for yetanother year.
A
quick survey of several Mercy-hurst
College students
indicated
that
students are not pleased with theincrease.Sophomore Thera Gaston feelsthat students should see a benefitfrom such
a
tuition increase. Fresh-men
Erio Valyko
worries that manystudents won't consider MercyhurstCollege with a high tuition. "Wepay enough to go here
a I
ready, andfor some people, that
6.71
percentincrease may just stop them fromeven considering this school,' saidValyko.
f
"If there is an increase, I better
see an
immediate benefit"
said
Gas-ton.Sophomore Joe Jerome also does
r
not support such an increase. "Asit
is,
not everyone can afford
to
payto go to Mercyhurst," said Jerome.I don't see why
It
needs to be in-
creased .** 1
Junior Kate Adams feels that theamount of individual scholarshipsfor students should also increasewith tuition.
"I
think that
most other
university and college tuitions doincrease annually, but normally notat such high of
a
rate. While Mer-cyhurst is a highly accreditedschool, the cost of tuition coulddeter many potential students andcause many others to transfer to
less expensive
schools.
I
don't
think
such
a
high tuition is necessary un-less the money will go towards im-proving such things as the libraryor housing, but even then, it
is
hardfor many to pay that much for aneducation.
11
Adams said.
Some information provided
hv
Kelly Rose Duttine.
 
PAGE
2
THEMERCIADMAY
8,2002
NEWS
To
contact:
U.S.
found possible Iraqibiological-weapon lab
By Jessica Guynn, Warren P.
Strobel
and
Tom
Infield
W
Knight Ridder Newspapers
^
WASHINGTON
_
The American-led coalitionin Iraq has discovered what it believes is
a
mo-bile biological-weapons laboratory, but is stilltrying to determine whether it was ever actual-ly used to make germ weapons.The truck-mounted facility is of the type de-scribed by Secretary of State Colin Powell in aFebruary speech
at the
United
Nations in
whichthe United States sought to show definitivelythat Saddam Hussein possessed weapons ofmass destruction.
fwi
American defense
and
intelligence officials
said
Tuesday that this may or not be the
"smoking
gun" that the coalition has been seeking to
jus-
tify
the war with Iraq.Six weeks after the first American air raidson Baghdad on March
20,
no proven biologi-
cal,
chemical or radiological weapon has yetturned up. The United States has come underincreasing pressure,, at home and abroad, toproduce evidence of the weapons' existence,^
Bush rewarding war allieswhile punishing critics
By Ron HutchesonKnight Ridder NewspapersWASHINGTON _ It's payback time at theWhite House, and countries around the worldare reaping the benefits or paying the price fortheir stand on the war with Iraq.The retribution fits Bush's longstanding pat-tern of rewarding friends and punishing ene-
mies,
but critics say it is adding to the alreadysubstantial
anti-American
sentiment abroad.
In the
latest example of tit-for-tat foreign pol-icy, Bush signed a free trade deal with war allySingapore Tuesday, while a similar agreementwith war opponent Chile has stalled.This week's White House guest list is a rollcall of war
allies.
On Wednesday, Bush
will
wel-come
Spanish'PrimeMmister
Jose
Maria
Aznarto the Oval Office. On Thursday, he meets
with
the foreign ministers from Bulgaria, Estonia,Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slov-
enia
_
allies
all.
He also will make time
for SheikHamad bin Khalifa
Al
Thani of Qatar,
which
hosted the U.S. military command
during
thewar, and Danish Prime Minister Anders FoghRasmussen, who also endorsed the war.War opponents shouldn't expect invitationsanytime soon.
Graham launches bid, blastsBush on national security
By Steven
Thomma
Knight Ridder NewspapersMIAMI LAKES, Fla. Sen. Bob Graham ofFlorida launched a campaign for the presiden-cy Tuesday, hoping his status as a politicalcolossus in the state that again could make orbreak a presidential election
wi 11
propel him tothe Democratic nomination and the WhiteHouse.Graham opened his campaign with a stingingattack on President Bush's greatest strength,his stewardship of the country's national secu-rity. He also promised to invigorate the mori-bund economy, protect the environment andpreserve Medicare and Social Security.
"We
must become one America again,"
he
toldabout 500 cheering supporters at a sun-drenched
rally in a
suburban town that
his
family
helped
develop*
|
I**An
America that looks to the dawn and
the
spring, an America whose sights are
higher,
never lower, whose aspirations are
greater,
never lesser.
"That
is why I am today declaring that I am acandidate for president."With his wife of
44
years at his side and
sur-1
rounded by children and grandchildren, Gra-ham became the ninth candidate seeking theDemocratic presidential nomination.
U.S
Sen.
Bob Graham (D-FL) officially de-clares his
bid
for
the
Democratic nomina-tion for president In the 2004 election onTuesday, May 6,2003.Patty Berberich surveys
the
damage
to
herhome in Leavenworth County, Kansas,after
severe
weather
and
tornadoes
hit
thearea Monday, May 5, 2003.
Kansas governor surveysareas devastated by tornado
By Stan Finger
Kn
ight Ridder NewspapersFRANKLIN^ Kan. _ Gov. Kathleen Sebeliussurveyed tornado-ravaged areas of Kansas byair and on foot Monday,
offering
victims solaceand promising to expedite her request to haveseven counties declared disaster areas by thefederal government.Standing next to the foundation of a housethat had blown
away'the
day before, Sebeliussaid she wanted to tell the residents "how verysorry I am" for "a very significant loss of
life."
"That is
a
tragedy that
will be
difficult to arisefrom," she said.Seven people died in Kansas and about 50more were injured by several tornadoes thatstruck more than a half-dozen counties. Sebe-lius has declared seven counties state disaster
areas,
and said Monday that she would workwith Missouri officials to make
a
joint plea forfederal disaster
relief.
President Bush promised quick action duringa trip Monday to Little
Rock,
Ark.
World at
risk
if China doesn'tcurb SARS, officials wars.
By Michael
Dorgan
Knight Ridder NewspapersBEIJING _ Successful efforts to combat theSARS virus in other countries will be
under-
mined if China cannot quickly curb the spreadof the epidemic, a World Health Organizationofficial warned Tuesday."If we don't
fix
it in China, it will never befixed anywhere," said Peter Cordingley, spokes-man for the
WHO's
Western
Pacific
region."China could re-seed the world."
Cordingley's
warning came as a counterpointto the hopeful downward trend in recent daysof new SARS infections in several formerpotspots. Vietnam has been declared the firstnation to rid itself of the
virus,
and the numbersof new cases in Hong Kong, Singapore andToronto have sharply declined.
1
rhat has been incrediblyencouraging,"Cord-ingley said in a telephone interview from the
WHO's
regional headquarters in Manila. "Butin the back of everyone's mind is a forebodingthat China could wreck it for everybody."New cases of SARS
have
not declined in Chi-na, the world's most populousnation,with
1.3
billion people.
Missing
Baghdad
art
l
hampered by ties to
Saddam
By Maureen FanKnight Ridder
Newspapers
*
BAGHDAD
_With about
a
week
to
go before
he leaves
Baghdad,
the
chief investigator of loot-ing at the National Museum of Antiquities onSunday released a list of
3
8 missing items, in-cluding a
5,000-year-old
Sacred
Vase
of Warcaand
a
4,000-year-old statue
 from
he Old Baby-lonian period.And
as
hundreds of museum workers returnedSaturday and Sunday for
a $20
emergency pay-ment to tide them over until their salaries re-sume, investigators said the probe has beenhampered by suspicions that the museum's
top
leaders had ties to the regime of
Sdddam
Hus-sein.
•>
J
The issues at the museum echo similar con-cerns about corruption throughout the country,
as
new political leaders,
interim
government or-|ficials
and others
talk
of "De-Baa hificat
ion"
and
how to repair a patronage system that has
been
totally loyal to Saddam for decades.The museum's administrative offices have]been stripped bare, a scene of
"absolute
wan-ton destruction,** officials said."Every single office, the door is kicked in.Every single office, the desk is turned
over.
Every single office, display cases are smashed,papers are strewn everywhere, videotape is
1
pulled out," said Bogdanos, who is a
New
YorkCity prosecutor and a student of classical an-tiquities.
"Most
of the anger was manifested
in
the administrative offices and not in the muse-um."
Police and Safety Log
4/4/03
3940 Lewis Ave.Liquor Law Violation.Underage drinking on campus
ft
3908 Lewis Ave.Liquor
Law
Violation.Underage drinking, party oncampus.3828 Lewis Ave.Theft.Unknown person alleged tohave entered
apartment,
stealing
CDs,
1
money, ID and
keys.!
4/5/03
H i
rt Academic CenterPranks.Student left sexual voice mailmessage to faculty member.
4/6/03
3828 W Lewis
Ave.
Weapons
Violation.Edged weapons
confiscated,
subject removed andterminated from school.
4/13/03
*
4010 Lewis Ave.Disorderly Conduct.Intoxicated students refused toleave the
building
for an activefire alarm.
4/14/03
1
Old MainCriminal
mischief.
Student damaged elevatordoor.Baldwin
Hall
Criminal
Mischief.
Unknown person threw awater balloon at window andbroke it.
15/1
Baldwin HallHarassment bycommunication/threats.Student harassed by phone
call
*
r
and
e-mail
messages withthreats.
4/7/03
3826 Briggs Ave.
Drug
Violation.Drug search and confiscation.3829
Briggs
Ave.Theft.
I ||
Bike stolen from basement.
4/20/03
D'Angelo
Performing ArtsCenterHarassment bycommunication.Unknown person left obscenemessage on answeringmachine.
4/25/Oi
3828 Lewis Ave.Theft.
;
Two loads of laundry taken.
4Z26/Q1
3830 Lewis Ave.
f
Criminal
mischief.
Damage done to the building.
4/27/03
Rest
room of PerformingArts Center
I
Criminal
mischief.
An unknown ripped soapdispenser and toilet paperdispenser from wall.
4/30/03
Lower Level Lot No. 2Criminal
mischief.-
An unknown person trashed agolf cart parked on ramp.
4/307031
D'Angelo Performing ArtsCenteri*Theft.-;An unknown person stole 6rugs from the entrance.
4/30/03
3810 Briggs Ave.Harassment bycommunicationHarassing phone calls.
Mercyhurst sponsors
seminar on green building design
Special
to The Merciad
Ever wonder what makes abuilding "green?"Well, area ar-chitects, contractors, municipaland code officials, and zoningofficers, planners and supervi-sors will get the chance to learnthe answer to that question, and
some
innovative ways to achievean environmentally
friendly
building during an upcomingseminar sponsored by Mercy-hurst Green, the Department ofEnvironmental Protection, thePennsylvania Governor's GreenBuilding Council, and the U.S.Department
oflEnergy
StateEnergy Program. On Wednes-day, May 28, and Thursday,May 29, Mercyhurst will hostthe seminar, during which ateam of experts will provide anintroduction to the principles ofgreen building and
sustainable
site design, construction* reno-vation, and maintenance prac-
tices.
Those attending will beprovided with an overview ofgreen buildings, including anoverview of the LEEDTM(Leadership in Energy and En-vironmental Design) standardsfor green buildings, proven andcost-effective green buildingtechnologies and alternativebuilding materials, and the ways
in
which administrative and reg-ulatory barriers to green designand construction can be over-come. In addition, there will beanswers about the process ofplanning new
green
buildings andrenovating old buildings
withgreen principles and technologies
in mind. Case studies will dem-onstrate the cost effectivenessof green design, making it clearthat
"going
green" is becomingnot only the right thing to do,but the smart thing as well.Onday two of the seminar, partici-pants will engage in the processof designing a green building,using the proposed academicbuilding at Mercyhurst NorthEast as a model for envisioninga green building.
major
course of study
Student
Monitor publishes nationally syndicatedresearch studies of the college student market.survey
1,200
full-time
undergraduates at
four-ye«
and universities were interviewed.For thisr colleges
BusinessEducation
Visual
and performing artsBiologyHealth professionsCommunicationsComputer scienceEngineeringPsychologyLiberal artsPolitical scienceEnglishCriminal justiceSocial
sciences/history
EconomicsChemistryPhilosophyInternational relationsUndeclared
'
'>.
|i2l
gfj
5,
 
2
IN
i
8
!
I*
2|
31
li
All numbers are a percentage value
 
MAY
8,2003
THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
t
Getting involved
Livmgjthe
7b
contact:
PINION
dream, facing reality
/f &
not
just
for
over-achievers
anymore
Mercyhurst College is
small.I would hope that by thispoint in the year that we have
al 1
come to accept this fact.If you haven't, I'm
sure
there is a lovely
twelve-step
program available, just contact
the YMC
A.
Remember:
denial
is
a disease.So anyway, Mercyhurst issmall and Erie is boring.*
Tj
Tinseltown is expensive, so
is
the
mall
and there is only somany times that one can walkaround
the
peninsula for enter-tainment
What is a
poor,
bored collegestudent to do?
£
Drink,
it would seem. At leastfrom a casual glance of someFriday night activities here oncampus.
*
However, that river of BudLight will not
 flow
 eternally, sowhat do you do then?Would you believe that thereis stuff
to
do on campus?I'm serious.
jr
Don't look at me that way.If I have to listen to onemore students whining abouthow there
is
nothing to do inErie on a Friday night exceptstay in and watch "America'sMost Talented
Kid,"
I
will notbe responsible for
my
actions.So, here's some advice forthose of
us who
will be return-
But I
Could
Be
Wrong
Jaime
Rinne
ing to
Mercyworld
next year:get involved.Seek out organizations thatinterest you. There are
many
clubs on campus that wouldappreciate your membershipand involvement.There are even clubs that ca-ter to certain majors, such asthe Anthropology or Psycholo-gy club, but all students areusually welcome.There are organizations thatsupport certain causes, such asPax Christi or SPAN (Studentsfor the Protection and Aware-ness of Nature).Don't be afraid
to
join, espe-cially if you consider yourselfyour apartment's resident ac-tivist or environmentalist.Who knows, you might evenget to go skydiving.
\
Don't have enough time
on
your,
hands to be a full-timemember?You can still show your sup-port for your organization ofchoice by attending theirevents.
Even
though
I am
not
a
mem-
ber,
there
have been
many timesI have enjoyed cookies andjuice
at the
Rotaract
blood drive
or attended a Diversity
101
dance.If nothing else, these eventsserve as a way of getting youaway from MTV's "Sorority/Fraternity Life" and out
and
about on a Friday night.Many departments sponsortheir own events, such as bookdiscussions or lecture series.What better way to ingratiateyourself to a
professor
than toshow up at an event that
youwill receive
absolutely
no
credit
for?
! M?P
i
Who knows, you might ac-tually learn something as well.So please, get out there anddo something next year.
Campus
involvement
is a great
supplement
to that
education wepay so much for.It looks great on a resume.
It looks
even better on
a
grad-uate school application.Best of all, you learn without
even
realizing
that you are
learn-ing.
Witty
remarks
are window-dressing
'A
witty
saying proves
nothing."
j •*&
—Voltaire
n
Remember that.
L
Hell, remember
that
especial-
5
ly
when you read this column.
i<
Quotations, maxims, prov-
b
erbs;these things are only as
fimeaningful
as the arguments
^
that back them up.
,> ••*.
L*;All too often we will take
I
something as truth simply be-
Ljcause
it is well
said,
o We live in
a nation full of peo-
/ple
who condense theiraware-
n
ness
of
politics
to David Let-
.jterman's
monologue, their phi-
losophies
to a bumper
sticker,
t
It is easier to define a belief
o
in terms of a snappy phraserithan it is to bother
understand-
oing
all of the "how's" and"why's" of the matter. JIt is really a symptom of ourcollective ignorance as a soci-ety.So few people bother to un-derstand important
issues in any
depth that
the
only way
we
canrelate to each other is to fire
off
jokes and sling slogans.Just listen to the average op-ponents of George
W.'Bush.
^Pay
attention
to how much
theyreference actual policy as op-posed
to
making fun of
he
wayhe speaks.
M
ention Dan
Quay I
e.
Most people will tell
you
thathe is an idiot, but can they citeany evidence besides a mis-spelling of potato?
c
Discuss Bill Clinton and try
f?to
get past the sex.You won't get far.
We
live on
a
college campus.
You
would
think that the
gen-
eral
population would have atleast a vague understanding ofwhat is going on. but we
don't...not
as a whole, any-
Quotation Marks
Josh West
People
are
just getting lazy.How many people do
you
think open this page of
The
Merciad
every week but havenever gotten beyond
The
Good,
The Bad
and
The Ugly?
It is just plain easier
to
read
a
list of bullet points or skimheadlines than it is to dive intoa whole article of words, wordsand more words.Check out national coverageof the war.
*
As readers and viewers, we
like
headlines
and
graphics.
We
like charts and lists. We wantthe hard news equivalent ofreading the cover of a book
and
then
glancing at the
picturesinside.Of the newspapers on cam-pus, the one least touched is,by far,
The New York Times,
because the
Times
never greetsthe readers with a front pagethat is made up of blurb- filledmargins and a three-quarter-page photo
spread!
instead, you get the typicalmedia consumer's worst fear:wall-to-wall text.There is information and tons
of
it.
'
:
;
f
That intimidates people these
days.>
But forget about that for asecond. This is about howmuch we understand and
how
quickly we are willing to
buy
into what someone else is say-
ing.
The media knows how sus-ceptible we are to their tech-niques and tricks. Everythingfrom advertising to campaign-ing will live
or die by how well
it is presented to the generalpublic* i
*
It is rare that we
find
an idea
floating
around in its purestform.Most of
us
never
see the
orig-inal, unadulterated state ofideas. What we see is the endproduct of countless brain-storming sessions, revisions,and think tanks.We see the spin.
The tobacco
companies
lie
toyou.Then the anti-smoking orga-nizations
lie to
you.Politicians
lie to
you.Then their opponents lie toyou.Then your favorite late nighthost sums it all up in a waythat will make you laugh and
you are able to
pretend
that
youhave an informed and wellthought out position when youtalk to your friends the nextday.Most of
us
play this game. Itmakes us feel comfortable.
We
can sit
at the dinner
table
and
talk
about the
world,
while
somewhere in the back of ourminds is the nagging thought,"Does anybody here have
anyidea
what they are talkingabout?"
4$
'I
Probably not, but as long aseveryone is equally unin-formed, there is plenty of
rue
1for conversation.*
*
Conversation like this is agreat help in perpetuating anelaborate illusion of under-standing.The illusion isn't enough.
We
need to strive toward theheart of
issues
and ideas rath-er than regurgitating nonsensethat sounds nice.
?
There are two things I hate:Mary Kate and Ashley Olsonmovies and sell-outs.The former speaks for
itself,
the latter, well, I may have be-come.
Wait)
Strike that.As a senior, I have two op-tions: career or prolong the ca-reer (and more importantly thefear of not getting the one Iwant) by attending grad schoolin the field I want to have mycareer in.Again, the latter option fitsme. I applied and got acceptedto two schools: one here, inErie, for a fall-ride and a sti-pend.The other
is
in sunny Califor-nia, Chapman Film School, atthe cost of the stuff debts arebuilt with:$60,000.
f IpS
That's
a
six, followed
by
four
zeros—including living
expens-
es.
One teacher said "You onlylive once" when I told her of
my
options. As soon as Ivoiced the price tag, her tunechanged.
| f
$60,000.That's a small home. A
for-
eign car.
The only
number
in the
worldthat is keeping my dream ofbeing
a
filmmaker
on
hold.
Does that make me a
sell-out?That's right, boys and girls.This
columnist,
who
has
advo-cated going with the gut asmuch as he has lamented the
And Another
Thing...
PhilPirrello
notion of
regret,
is taking thesafe bet. The smart way, themore affordable way."Take a loan!" my one friendgleefully muses, half seriously.I want to. iI desperately want to throwyears of cautious penny-pinch-ing to the wind, give double-finger
to
Erie
 from
he windowseat of a JetBlue, create anoth-er low-interest rate friendshipwith PHEAA and see, as thesongsays,if "it never
rains
insouthern California."Instead, like another songsays,
I
am facing my "quarter-life crisis'* with my safety netin tact, finally starting to
getused to the
fact that
I have
timeon my side, that it is muchhealthier in
the long run to have
a Masters in something thenbasking under the sunshinewith
a
U-Haul
and debt in tow."What price tag are you gon-na put on your dream?" "Howmany
4
noV
is your dreamworth?"
\
I
All of these Tony Robbins-sounding lines came from afriend, the only
 friend
 who
hasever made me listen to suchcliched-sounding
maxims with
the level of analysis and rela-tivity they deserve.For college grads, decisions
like
school
or
ob,
home or
TheDream, seem dire and apoca-lyptic no matter what the out-come.But they really aren't. In thegrand scheme of things, all ofus still have to ask someone tomarry them, decide where toand how to raise a family ormourn a loss.
We have a college degree
andprecious life experiences thatwill
make us smile
 from
 behindwhatever cherry-wood
desk,
movie soundstage or class-room life finds us in.Giving in to what mommyand daddy
say you
should haveis
not
the same as doing whatyou want5 Going with
the
"cool"
idea
isnot necessarily better than thepractical one.And I don't know whatmakes anyone but me happy,or what anyone else feels theyshould do to ensure their re-spective happiness.All I know is that there arenow
three
things I hate:1) Olson Twin movies, 2)sell-outs and
3)
those that con-fuse themselves as sell-outswhen
all
they are doing is tak-ing the scenic tour down theroad less traveled.
Style goes vintage
Ready-to- Wear
MeganCvitkovic
Spring
is
finally
in the
air,
and
at last we are free to shop forshorts, skirts and sandals with-out having to worry about thepossibility ofsnow.But before you head out toyour favorite shop, consider
one
of he latest trends pickingup speed
this
year: vintage.Now, while most retailers arenot specialized enough to car-ry actual vintagepieces,popu-lar
styles
and trends of
the
pasthave had a great influence onspring seasonal assortments.Vintage silhouettes, colors,
patterns and designs can
be justas cool and authentic
looking
as the original, as long as youknow what to go for.The
1940s
and
1950s
are par-ticularly important decades, as
we
see much of society return-ing to the simple, toned downelegance of
a
country at war.Just as in the forties, WWIIhad an impact on fashion, es-pecially because of rationing.Gulf
War 11
has also led to adecrease
in
flashy appearancesby movie stars and the like.' But for
elegance,'fashion
isbeginning to look to ChristianDior's "New Look" of the1950s.
-f
W
*
The New Look was com-prised of either very full skirtswith fitted bodices
or.very
tight, tapered skirts.But if you aren't the skirt ordresstype,next time you slideinto those cute and comfycuffed Capri's, just rememberthey're not new.Other looks that go great forthis decade include: pointedshoes with kitty heels, narrowbelts and puff
cap
sleeves.For guys, the 1950s offersome great styles from thegreaser James Dean types to
the
preppy kids.Very dark rinsed denim isback in action. It can be pairedwith a plain white tee or plaidbutton down to achieve
that
vintage look.From the '60s,
We
are seeing
empire waistlines coming
back.
We
are also seeing the returnof mini skirts, short
a-line
dresses, very bright colors andpop-art images.|V The "Jackie O." look is alsohuge, with simple belted dress-
es,
small lace and bow detail-ing, shorter, boxy jackets andthe
bouffant
hair.The
1970s
inspired pieces in-
cluded:
halter necklines, jump-suits (denim!),
velour
and hotpants.The disco decade is alsobringing
back those
big,funkysunglasses and even costumejewelry.
But perhaps the
decade mak-ing the biggest splash thisspring is (gulp) the
80s.As scary as it might seem tolook back at what
we
all woreduring our childhood or teenyears, the
'80s
have impactedrecent fashion trends andstyles.Vintage pieces can add afresh look to your closet withunique and original items.Vintage is also a great sug-gestion for any important orspecial occasion (Senior Din-ner Dance!!) approaching inthe near future.
With
a vintage
ou I
fit,
you
canpretty much
be
assured that noone else will have your dress.
^MERCIAD
Kristin PurdyAdam DuShole
Kelly Rose
DuttineCourtney
N icholasPhil Pirrello
Mackenzie
Dexter
Judy
Mello
Emily Crofoot
Billy Elliott
Megan
Eble
Editor-in-ChiefManaging
Editor£
ecrofo81 (©mercyhurst.edu prod mereiad@mereyhurst.edu 
The Merciad
is the
student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst College. It ispublished throughout
the school
year,
with the exception
of
midterms week and
finals
week.
Our office
is in
the Hirt
Center,
room
LL114. Our telephone numberis 824-2376.
M f
The
Merciad
welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed and
names will be included with the
letters. Although
we will
not edit the
letters
forcontent,
we reserve the
right
to trim letters to
 fit.
 Letters
are due the
Thursdaybefore publication
and may not be
longer
than 300
words. Submit letters
to box
PH485.
;
$
?

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