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The Merciad, Dec. 17, 2003

The Merciad, Dec. 17, 2003

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The Merciad, Dec. 17, 2003
The Merciad, Dec. 17, 2003

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06/28/2012

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THE;STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929Vd®77 No.10
The
Merciad
is also available
at
NEWS:
Students awarded forliving
out
the mission
ofMercyhurst
PAGE 3
FEATURES:
The Hamady
twinsare
twice
as nice.
PAGE 5
OPINION:
Does religion create
a
hive mentality?
PAGE 7
ARTS&
ENTERTAINMENT
Check out PostOffice's new album
4
JGfveJJpa4flr^
PAGE
8
SPORTS:
Men's basketball onfire
with
two
more
wins.!:
PAGE 12
Upcoming Campus Events
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 17
-
Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to
4
p.m. in theMSG Chambers, Student UnionFilm: "Metropolis",
2
p.m.'and
8
p.m.
in
the
PACTHURSDAY,DEC.|18
-
InterVarsity
(
hristian Fellowship,
8
p.m. in the MSG Chambers, StudentUnionFRIDAY, DEC.
19-
Last day of classes for students,Christmas vacation begins afterclassesTUESDAY, JAN. 6
-
SAC General Meeting,
9
p.m. in theMSG Chambers, Student Union
Index
News*
.*,...,...*..&.
...1
News,*.
»
*
2
News*
5
<j
3
Features
«*• 4
Features
»i»
*
Forum.....
•-•*
°
Opinion
'
A
&
£.....
i «
8
A & M
\-\
*
9
Sports I
«, "v p
Sports
£
'!
Sports
........12
. 38th$t Erie Pa. 116546December
¥7,
20
Christmas on Campusspreads cheertoall
Left
: M i ke
Foglio and An-nie DiBartolom-eo take a breakfrom
a busy
dayputting smileson children atChristmas onCampus.Below: Christ-
mas on
CampusStudent Direc-tor
Anne
Slegel
has
two helpersto welcome thearrival of Santa
Claus
to theUnion last Sat-urday.
New policymay affect
someHubs
on campus
By Holly
BumsContributing
write r
By:
Jonelle Davis
Contributing
writer
tographer
It is Christmas time and onceagain the spirit of giving is in theair. On Saturday Dec. 13 Mercy-hurst College
hosted Christmas
onCampus for
kids
rom
 1-4 p.m.Christmas on Campus
wel-
comed underprivileged childrenfrom neighborhood agencies tocome to Mercyhurst
and
celebrate
Christmas.
^^^** ^
For most of these children, thisevent
was
the
only
Christmas theywill have this year
/* ,'
According to Anne
Slegel, Stu-
dent Director of
Christmas
on
Cam-
pus,
students
decorated
the
Union
in
advance to
prepare for the
day,turning the Union into a magical
world.
After the preparation was
fin-
ished,
many other students joined
in
to welcome the
children
to
Mer-
cyhurst.After the children arrived, therowing,
football
and
lacrosse teamsplayed games to kick off
the
day.After
this,
the
children
were eachassigned a student buddy.'The buddies took the childrenaround the Union, doing every-thing
rom
 crafts to face painting.They were also given a chance to
shop
for
free gifts
for their parentsat Santa's shop.The day also included the ap-pearance of Disney Character'sprovided by Campus
Ministry,.areading
of
The
Night
Before
Christ-
mas,
and of course a visit fromSanta Claus
and
Mrs. Claus.Not only
were
the
children
hap-
I
py, but the students that helpedthem also got satisfaction out ofgiving back to the community.
According
to
Mercyhurst
student
Pam
Cichon, she participated as abuddy to help make a little kidsChristmas
better.
?"I
know that
I
always got excit-
ed
about Christmas
and
Santa
when
I
was
little.
I
can't imagine what itwould be like to not get to cele-brate Christmas with the gifts andgames and crafts that
I
used
to,"
said
Cichon.She went on to say that it wasreally fun being a buddy.
"My
lit-tle
girl
was so
excited
about every-
thing
She appreciated each craftor game that we played. I
It
wasgreat to watoh her face when shewould win a prize."Every
part
of
he
event
was
a
suc-
Contributing pholograptter
cess, but the amount of work
ft
took putting the program togeth-er
was
enormous. 1According to Anne Siegel, she]spent months preparing each
as
pect of
the
event.
Still,
she
felt it Was worth thework.
This
event was importantbecause people often miss
thej
most important aspect of Christ-
mas,
which is giving."
$
Siegel also went
on
to say that]faculty advisors Cass
Shimek an
iPenny Hanes,
along with
AssistanStudent Director Kelly Rose
Dut-J
tine and a helpful committee ofvolunteers,
played
crucial rules Inorganizing the event.The Mission committee of
Mer-
cyhurst College is hard
at
work,
in
an
attempt to finalize
a
Controversial
Issues
Statement, regarding
the
pub
lication
of controversial ssues n
cam-
pus publications.
The
purpose
of
the
ControversialIssues Statement is to affirm whoMercyhurst
is
and
how
we
respectour
Catholic/Mercy
mission and
tra-dition,
according to
the
draft
docu-
ment shown
to
The
Merdadstaff.
It also
is
meant to show how we
treasure
the creative tension which
is
a necessary
part
of he
college
en-
vironment"The statement
once
inalized,
 willbe disseminated
to
all
student dubs,organizations, faculty members,coaches,
and
administrators.From there,
it will
be
used
to guidetheir activities
and the
products
oftheir efforts. All members of thecollege community
will
be
called
to
assess their
activities
using
the
standards established
in
the
Controver-
sial
Issues Statement according to th<draft policy..
If
a
club
or organization
has
con-
cerns
about a project
dr
restrictions
| placed upon
them,
the
draft policy
calls
for
them
to
be
invited
to bringtheir concerns
to the
Appeals
Com-
mittee of
the
Student Communica-tions Review
Board.
This
is a
sub-committee of
he
Trustees'
Studenl
Life Committee.If, for any reason, the AppealsCommittee cannot resolve
the
issue
a
full meeting
of
he
Student
Com-
munications Review
Board will
be
held
to address the controversy anddetermine
a
course of
action, accord-
ing
to
the
draft
policy.
However,
if
a dub
or organization
does not seek
the opinion
of
he
Re-
view
Board
and
produces
a
publica-
tion that goes
against
the
standards
set
by
he
Controversial
Issues Statement,
the
draft policy calls for thataction
to
be
reviewed
by the AppealsCommittee.The irstoffense would be a
warn-
ing.
A
second
offense may result inthe termination of
he
organization,according to the
draft
policy.Cathy Anderson, Associate
Vice
President of Student Development
and
Mary Daly, Senior
Assistant
tc
the
President for
Board Relations
and
Special
Events
would
not comment
at this
time. I
The
trustees' Mission Committee
will meet
Jan.
6 to discuss the policy
and
possible
action.
DressToKill
By
Amanda
Orendorf
Contributing writer
The fashion merchandising de-partment
at
Mercyhurst
College
put
on its first fashion show
Dec.
12
inthe Walker Recital
Hall.
The
fash-
Ion show's theme,
"Dress
to
Kill,
Not Drink to
Kill,"
was
Intended
tohelp raise alcohol awareness oncampus.
"Drinking
responsibly
is
a
nation-
al problem and
a
recent event thathappened within the fashion de-partment was the catalyst for thisevent," stated Lindsay
Rider,
Co-
Chairman
of the fashion show.
The
fashion
show
was
funded
bya grant given by President William
P.
Garvey,
the
student
government,and also by student fundraising.The money that
we
raised will
goto a day for alcohol awareness oncampus
In
February and also
will
go
back into
the
school,"
stated
Rid-
er,
y
Dress to
Kill
raised about $1,000for Mercyhurst
College
and
alcoholawareness.The fashion show consisted offour
sets that included
formal,
rockand
roll,
contemporary, and T-shirts.,
In
between each set was astudent speaker
talking
about theirown personal experiences
with
al-
cohol.
The student speakers talkedabout
alcoholism
and
their friend'sdeath and Injuries that occurred asa direct result of drinking. $The
models included some
of the
fashion merchandising
majors alongwith some male athletes on cam-
pus.
The athletes
included Mike
Marshall, Mike Cahoon, Brian
Smith,
Terrance Patrick, Jared Ad-
ams,
Brian Bartlet,
Joe
Jerome, and
PWWdPQNSJVS/jovv
on
page
J J
Anna
Quorrtoro/ConlitbuUng photographer
Junior Joe Jerome makes
hit
modeling debut for
a
good cause.
 
PAGE
2
THEMERCIADDECEMBER 17,2003
National
&
International
News
7b
Capturing
Saddam Hussein was found in the
of*
farmhouse and arrested
a
shot being
fired:
|Time:Saturday, Dec. 13,8
p.m.
local time f
cation
Red
i
Dawn":
U.S.
specialforces moved into the area
*•
# »;
hours after Iraqi tipTHWing
place:
"Spider
hoie"underground,
about 2 m
(6.6 ft.)deep,
with ventilation
pipe;
hole
i
camouflaged with
bricks,
dirtResult Saddam offered
noresistance,
he is talkative
and
F;
two
other people aHa
arrested;
weapons and more than$750,000 cash confiscated | ^_____^_
Soira:AFI» Aft
CNN.
NRT photo earvtoe
OepNc:
Jul*
Schtfbt.
Morton
Lfhrm
eSOOS
Council
wants
Saddam
tried
by
Iraqi
tribunal
By Maureen
Fan
Knight Ridd
er
Newspapers
BAGHDAD, Iraq—Contro-
versy over
how to
prosecuteSaddam Hussein intensifiedMonday as President Bush said
the
United States would workwith Iraq
to
develop a
way to
try
him,
while members of Iraq's ^Governing Council insisted that
4
the
former dictator would be Jtried in public
by
ah
already-cre-
ated all-Iraqi
war
crimes
tribu-
nal as early as
March.
While some council memberswant to see Saddam put to
death,
U.N.
Secretary-General KofiAnnan opposed
any
proceedingsthat had
the
death penalty as
an
option.
And
Iraq's neighborsdamored
for
their own
proceed-
ings against
he
captured former
dictator.
'i
Z
"He has to be tried
by
the
tri-
bunal we set up a few days
ago,"
said Mowaffak al
Rubaie,
a
Brit-
ish-trained physician who
was
one
of
four Governing Councilmembers who met Saddam
for
about
30 to 40
minutes earlySunday
morning.
f
The trial will be public
and
tele-
vised
and
Saddam could face
the
death
penalty,
Rubaie
said.
They were
big
crimes he
did,
from mass graves
to
killing
cler-
ics
to gassing the
Kurds.
Thereare enough crimes
to
hang
him
many housands
of
imes,"
saidcouncil member Mohsen Abdul
Hameed,
the secretary general
of he
Iraqi Islamic
Party.
"But
the
court will
be
fair.
We
will give
him
lawyers and it will be
public.
It will definitely
be
televised."
Human rights groups have
ex-
pressed concern that the Iraqislack
he
technical ability
o
 pros-
ecute Saddam fairly
on
their
own.
Legislation
to
create
the
war-crimes tribunal
was ap-
proved last week
by the Gov-
erning Council only after a
pro-
vision was inserted allowing
for
international
advisers,
yet t
was
unclear whether council
mem~
bersjntendfcd
to
bring feintergfnational
expf&ts.
T?
9
S J?"We will work with the Iraqis
to
develop
a
way o
try
him
and
that will stand up to
intemation-
al
scrutiny,"
President Bush said
in
Washington.
The
Iraqis need
to
be
involved.
They were
the
ones who were
brutalized...
M
They need to be very much
in-
volved in the
process."
1
m
Although the
U.S.-backed
coa-
lition authority
has
suspended
the
death penalty in
Iraq,
it could
be;
brought back after sovereignty
is
restored July
1,
promptingAnnan
to
object.
'1
The U.N.
does
not
support
a
death
penalty.
In all the courtswe have set
up, (U.N.
officials)have not included a death
pen-
alty,"
Annan said Monday at
the
United
Nations.
"And so
as sec-
retary-general,
and the
U.N.asan
organization,
I am
not
goingto now urn around and
support
:
,j
a
death
penalty."A
senior State Departmentofficial said Monday that it was"clearly for the Iraqis to
decide"
if
the death penalty should
be
Imposed on
Saddam.
"He
victimized their entire
population,
so
whatever
punish-
ment hey deem
applies,
we will
be
satisfied,"
said
the
official,
who
spoke
on
condition
of
a
no-
>j
nymity.The
official said
the
UnitedStates also reserved
the
ight
o
prosecute Saddam
or
 crimescommitted against
Americans. ||Two of
Iraq's neighbors
de-
manded Monday hat Saddam
be
tried for
war
crimes against heir
countries.
Their chances
of try-
ing him in an international
ven-
tie
arsslim
 
however,grver+thatttfSU:Nrcourtsin The
Hague,Netherlands,
have
no urisdic-
tion.
-
£
J.
In Kuwait the prime
minister,;
)tasked his nation's
op
awyers
to
"go
after"
Saddam,
said WaleedAbdul-Latif al
Nusif,
the
editor
of
the dally newspaper
al Qa-
bas.
Saddam invaded Kuwait
n
1990,
an act hat precipitated
the
first
U.S.-led
Persian Gulf
War.
What court the Arab countryplans to
ile
ts case in was
un-
clear,
although
the
charges
prob-
ably would be criminal ratherthan
civil,
Nusif
said.
Iran also is pursuing a
crimi-
nal
complaint against Saddam
forhis
1980-88
war
against that
country,
government spokesmanAbdollah Ramazanzadeh saidduring
a
weekly briefing in
Te-hran.
Saddam used chemicalweapons during that
war,
whichended in a draw and claimed atleast 300,000 Iranian
lives.
"We want the crimes
of
Iraq'sdictator to
be
examined in a
com-
petent International court and
for
him to be put on
trial,"
Ramaza-
nzadeh
said.
The
Foreign
Min-
istry has taken some measureson this Issue and has collectedthe necessary
documents."
Enlistmentsjgrowing
despiteslipping support
for war
By Patrick
S.
PembertonKnight Ridder NewspapersLisa Fay doesn't agree with thewar n
Iraq,
but
she's oining
theArmyanyway.
A4-year
stint,
the Oceano teen
said,
will allow her to receive the,']training she needs to become amental health
specialist,
whichcould lead to a career in social
services.
When
he
enters
the
Army next
spring,
Jason Scaroni will alreadyhave
a
degree in computer
sci-
ence from Cal
Poly.
But he wouldlike
the
Army o
pay off his
stu-
dent
bans.
The
Army will
pay up to
$65,000 in school
loans.
Scaronihas around
$30,000.!•
p
"So
that will take care
of allof
my loan
debt,"
said the
San
Luis Obispo residentEven though support
for
mili-
tary nvolvement In I raq
is
wan-
ing (the country is now evenly
split,
according to several pollsconducted last
month), all
branches
of the
service
are
meeting their enlistment
quotas.
P Things have been going
very,
very
well,"
said Douglas
Smith,
a spokesman for the Army
Re-
cruiting Command in
Georgia.
"\AfeVemade our recruiting
mis-
sion for he
year."
Last
month,
the Army's goalwas to recruit
6,400
new enlist-ees nationwide. It
signed
up6,594.In San
Luis Obispo
County,
more than 100 people have
en-
listed in the Army this
year—
morethan twicethe numberthatjoined the year
before,
said
Sgt
Tom
Cromer.
:County recruitment numberswere
not
available for
he Navy,
Air Force
or Marines,
and localrecruiters from those branches
all
deferred questions to
out-of-
area
spokespersons. But
nation-
ally,
none
of
he three branchesappear to be impacted
by
slip-
ping support or
he war.
Critics
say
the war n Iraq hasbeen
too costly, has
resulted Infurther instability
in
the MiddleEast and—worst of all—hasresulted in the deaths
of
morethan 430
U.S.
troops as this
sto-
ry goes to
press.;
The
possibility
of
encounter-
ing danger
has
sparked questionsfrom potential recruits
and
their
parents,
Cromer
said.
But
the
odds
of
getting killed in Iraq
are
slim,
he
said.
"It's concerning
to a lot of
^
people, of
course,"
Cromersaid.
"But I don't see a
big
impact
as
far as enlistm
ents."
To help keep he military
sup-
plied with
troops,
the
federalgovernment has increased
ex-
penses
for
recruiters as well
as
boosted incentives o
oin.
The Army,
which
has
targetedcollege students and
college-
bound high
schoolers,
startedexperimenting with 15-monthterms
of
service
to
appeal
to
those reluctant
to
commit o
the
previous minimum commitment
of
wo
years.
| s
Meanwhile,
the
G.I.
bill will
pay
more money for schooling
(upto
$50,000) once a soldier
fin-
ishes
a
stint And those
who
al-
ready have graduated from
col-
lege can have
up to
$65,000
re-
paid by the
service.
In addition
to that,
some
re-
cruits receive cash bonuses of
up to
$20,000 (depending
on
factors ike prior education
andassignment),
and many will
re-
ceive training that could makethem more marketable in
civil-
ian
life.
All that
can
be
appealing,
es-
pecially when the economy is stillrecovering from a 2001
reces-
sion that put
two
million peopleout
of work."Basically,
the military is mylast resort
in
life,"
said Jamie
Gooch, 25,
of Atascadero.
Gooch,
who has a wife and
3-
year-old
daughter,
said he cantfind stable
work, he
said,
and
he
cannot afford
to
go to
school.
So
he'll
get
training
in
aircraftrepair in
the Army.
H "Right
now if8
so tight withmoney—with all
the
bills
and
stuff
— the
Army
is
basically
The
economy made significantgains in
the
third quarter
of
his
year,
but
economists
say job
growth is still
slow.
And many high school
gradu-
ates
are
weary
of
having
to
spend years paying
off
loan
debts.
J&According to the
U.S.
Depart-
ment
of Edu
cation,
64 percent
of
students have
to
take
out
loans
for
college.
The
averagedebt upon graduation
is
roughly
$17,000 n £
While
the
Army will
pay
Sea
-
roni's loan
debts,
he also will
re-
ceive a $20,000 signing bonusand training as
a
linguist
r
He's hoping to learn
Arabic.
no
Vll
Saddam's
capture
willnotmean more
forces
available to find bin
Laden
By Juan
O.
TamayoKnight Ridder NewspapersSaddam Hussein's capture
is
unlikely
to
prompt
U.S.
officials
to
intensify their search
for
Osa-
ma bin
Laden
in
Afghanistan,
|terror experts said
Sunday.
V The CIA and Pentagon
are
un-
likely
to
return
to
Afghanistanthe scores
of U.S.
commandosand intelligence agents that
had
been seeking bin Laden beforethey were shifted to Iraq
to
crackdown on Iraqi
rebels,
fThat mission remains moreimportant than turning up
the
heat
on bin
Laden,
who
theybelieve to be all
but
isolated in aremote comer
of Afghanistan,the
analysts
said.
Nearly half
the U.S.
intelli-
gence and commando agents
who
had been in Afghanistanand neighboring Pakistan werereassigned to Iraq starting lastsummer after the resistance
be-
gan
intensifying.
The
redeploy-
ment raised complaints n
Wash-
ington that President Bush
was
easing
{he
pressures on bin
Lad-
en.
Many
of the new
arrivals
in
Iraq wound
up
in Task Force
121,
an elite
orce
 of CIA
ana-
lysts and
linguists,
Army Green
Beret,
Delta Force
and
NavySEAL commandos
and CIA
paramilitary units created
in
October
o
track down and
cap-
ture
or
kill Saddam
and
resis-
tance
eaders.
3?
"Clearly,
the resources
devot-
ed to bin Laden were
diluted,
but
I don't expect a switch back toAfghanistan ust because of
he
capture
of
Saddam,
said
Can-
nistraro.
§He and other analysts arguedthat the manhunts
or
 Saddamand bin Laden
are
quite
differ-
ent and
therefore require
differ-
ent
types
of resources.The
search
for
Saddam requiredmore
of
a military than an
intel-
ligence operation because
he was
hiding out in a country occupied
by
more than 130,000
U.S.
troops and had little
support,
saidStanley
Bedlington, a
formersenior analyst In
the
CIA's
Coun-
terterrorist
Center.
This one was a more
specifi-
cally military operation because
it
Involved regular Infantry alongwith
the CIA and (the
Penta-
gon's) Defense Intelligence
Agency,"
Bedlington
said.
The hunt
for
bin
Laden,
on
the
other
hand,
is more
of
an
intel-
ligence operation because he
is
widely believed to be hiding
out
In
the
mountains along the
re-
mote Afghan-Pakistani
border,
with help from Muslim radicals
and
local tribal
leaders."
"Moreover,
Osama is
neutral-ized,
so there's
no
rush to
get
him,"
Dunnigan
added.
"Moreurgent attention must be paid
to
bin Laden followers outside
Af-
ghanistan
and
Pakistan who
are
actively planning
operations."
Fall Term Laker-Inn
Lunch
Specials
Monday ___
Bagel Sandwich Cheeseburger
8 oz.
Fruit
Cup
Curly French Fries
20 oz.
Fountain
Drink
20 oz.
FountainDrink
Wednesday
Sizzling Salad
20 oz.
FountainDrink
Thursday
"fTaco Salad
20 oz.
FountainDrink
Friday
Wrap
2
Cookies
20 oz.
FountainDrink
I:
Saturday
Combination
Sub
Small FrenchFries
20 oz.
FountainDrink
Students:
Don't Forget
to
CRAB Your "Lunch
on the
RunT
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DECEMBER
17,2003THEMEROAD
PAGE 3
Mercvhurst students live the mission
To
contact newsmerciad@
mercyhurst.
edu
NEWS
By Jennifer
Allen
Contributing writerStudents from both Mercv-hurst campuses were recognizedfor living the mission of Mercy-
hurst
College on Wednesday,December
10,
in
connection with
the'founding
of the Sisters ofMercy Foundation on Dec. 12,
1831.
There were one hundred-sixty students were honored fortheir efforts at a reception heldin the Mercy Heritage Room.The mission of
Mercvhurst
College that these students havelived so well states,
".
.
.Inspired
by the Sisters of Mercy, the col-lege holds in highest esteem thequalities of excellence, compas-sion, creativity, and service toothers."In the third year for
"Living
the Mission" Sister KathleenMarie Leap, Director of theMercy Institute, Sister Geraldi-neRosinski,Director ofCam-pus Ministry, and Sister
Michele
Marie Schroeck, Director ofService Learning, welcomed stu-dents to the reception and pre-sented them with certificates tohonor their work.Sister
Geraldine
Rosinski
said
of the faculty recognizing stu-dents for their compassion, ser-vice, and volunteer work,
This
is a way for us to perpetuate themission of the Sisters of Mer-cy."She felt that it
was
great forthese students to be recognizedfor their achievements as well.One student honored for liv-ing the mission of
the
Sisters ofMercy, was Nicole Craven, asophomore who was alsonomi-nated last year. She was nomi-nated this year for her servicelearning work at the Martin Luth-er King
Jr.
Center inErie.
"I
loved going to the Martin
Katw
McAdamvPhoto
ecWor
Living the Mission award winners enjoy the reception
In
their honor
In
the Mercy
Heri-
tage Room. From left to right are Sr.
Mlchele
Schroeck, Greg Wllczynskl,
Mike Miele
and Dan Stilson.
Police&
Safety
Daily
Crime
Log
November 16, 2003Warde Townhouse* #1Burglary: Gateway LaptopComputer stolen from table
in
apt.Investigated*
December 6, 20033907 Lewis Ave,Criminal
Mischief:
Unknown
pecson(s) damaged
a tree andbranch located in
die
court-yard,
Investigated.3829
Briggs
Aye.Criminal
Mischief:
Door han-dle found to be broken, unableto secure or lock the door, In-vestigatedDecember 7, 2003Baldwin
Hall I
%*
Theft: Theft of
debit
cardfrom student's room, Investi-gated.Baldwin Hall
| Larceny
Theft: Wallet stolenfrom purse in apt. #236, Inves-tigated.December
8,
2003
,3923
Lewis AveCollege Violations: Studenthad a pet dog in the apt,Investigated.Luther
King
Jr.
Center," Craven
said
"I think the kids taught memore than I taught them some-tunes."
|
Craven loved her experienceworking with the children at thecenter and said,
"It
makes mefeel very good that people thinkI amnice."Amy Mason, also a sopho-more, was
recognized
for herwork at the Martin Luther King
Jr.
Center as
well
"It felt greatto be nominated," she said.Mason said of the
initial
ex-perience, "It wasn't really whatI expected, and
it
took a coupleweeks for the kids to start warm-not
have
normally been exposed
A '
ingup.She later added, "It was fun;a learning experience that reallyopened up my eyes to a groupof people and kids that I would
to."
i
d
Katie Walker was another of
the
many recipients of the award.She is a junior communications
major
who was nominated
by
Dr.Melissa Gibson Hancox, for allof the work she has done withinthe communications departmentas well as for helping out withDr. Gibson's Freshman Year
Ini-
tiative class.Walker was very happy to bechosen for the award. She said,"I found being nominated
a
verylarge honor, it was nice to be rec-ognized by the faculty for all ofthe hard
work
and other thingsI have given to Mercyhurst."Sister Kathleen Marie Leap,who was in charge of the event,said, "It was good to have manymembers of the college commu-nity stop by to congratulate
the
students and to enjoy the re-freshments."The students honored at thereception received cards
with
aquote from the Constitution ofthe Sisters of Mercy of theAmericas
as
well. This
said,
"Wewitness to MERCY when wereverence the dignity of eachperson, create a spirit of hospi-tality and pursue integrity ofword and deed in our lives."The certificate also congratu-lated the students on beingnamed a Mercyhurst
College
stu-dent of "Living the Mission"and included the mission state-ment that so many students atMercyhurst College live everyday.November 17, 20033827/3829 Briggs Ave.
Larceny/Theft:
One pair ofhockey pants stolen
from
laun-dry area,'
Investigated.
December
%
20033925
Briggs
Ave.Medical Emergency:
III
Stu
dent, Investigated.
November 18, 20033924 Lewis Ave.Theft: Unknown person(s)took
a
student's
key
Investigat-ed.November 20,
2003-
McAuley
Hall
Theft:
Unknown person(s)
took jewelry, school books, andCD's from a student's room,Investigated.December
11,
2003
McAuleyHall |j
Theft Theft of
a
chair,
wal-let, money, and clothes from astudent's room, Investigated.December 12, 2003East DuvalSmoke Alarm: Studentburned food while cooking,Investigated.November 23, 200323 West Duval ftCollege Violations: Studenthad a pet cat
in
the
apt-,
Inves-
tigated.
5
December
15,
2003West Main DriveHarassment: Unknownperson(s) threw eggs at com-plainant and yelled racial re-marks, Investigated.
Fashion
shciw
raises awareness
BrC&tQUfiJ
*tllC-
IllOlCl
Continued from Page
L
According to junior AshleyBreen, "I really
enjoyed
the
show.The message was gpod overall.This event hit dose
to
home be-cause
my
sister's dose
friend waskilled by a drunk driver."The night was a great successwith an outcome of more than140 students. "We know thatdrinking occurs.
We
just want topromote
responsible
drinking.We want people to look afterone another and take advantageof the facilities on campus to besafe when drinking," stated Rid-er."The fashion show has beena success because of all the fash-ion majors, Dr. Garvey,
Kathy
Anderson, Student Government,and
Manlynn
Smith. Hopefullythis will be the first of
an
annual
event,"
said Rider.
Winter breaks spent
a
variety
of
way
Anna Guernero/Contributing photographer
TWo
Mercyhurst
students walk
the runway
for
a
good
causelast Friday.
Teacher evaluations often reflectattractiveness, study finds
By Gwenn MillerKnight Ridder NewspapersQuestion No. 1: On a scale ofone to
10,
how effective
was
yourprofessor?
|
Question No. 2: On a scale ofone to 10, how would you rateyour
professor's
looks?
\
Think the second question isoutrageous? Well, it is. It wouldnever appear on a
student evaluation
of a professor.But that doesn't mean
it's
nota factor as Pennsylvania StateUniversity students fill out Stu-dent Rating of Teaching Effec-tiveness forms this week.In a recent stud)
two
research-ers at the
I Jniversiry
of Texas atAustin concluded that more at-tractive professors outscoredtheir more homely peers onteaching evaluations.Daniel Hamermesh, professorof economics, and one his stu-dents, Amy Parker, asked stu-dents to look at photographs of]94 professors and rate theirlooks. They compared the rat-ings with average
student
evalu-ation scores
for
the courses thoseprofessors taught.The researchers found that theprofessors who rated high in thelooks category also were rated
bettei
teachers than less-Attrac-
tive
professors,
by
almost a point.According to an October
article
in the Chronicle
of
Higher Ed-ucation, that's a substantial
dif-
ference.Reviews of the study aremixed.Robert
Secor,
vice provost
for
academic
affairs
at Penn State,
said
the
university's
own
researchfound that the biggest indicator
of
student evaluations was howmuch they learned from thecourse.
"The
more the students feltthey learned, the higher thescores," Secor
said
It matters so much that entireWeb sites are devoted toevalu-atingprofessors.
 allowsstudents to rate teaching effec-tiveness and
professor's
looks
(depicted
by a chili pepper
it
they are deemed
"hot")-
1
Kimbedy
Rodgers, Penn Stateassistant professor of finance,was one professor whose nameappeared on the site. She saidreasonable people will reject In-
ternet-posted
evaluations.
"The
notion of correlating in-structor appearance with effec-tive teaching strikes me as non-sensical/' Rodgers
said.
As superficial
as
die
study (and
die
Web site) might sound, stu-dent evaluations can have seri-ous implications for faculty Ten-ure-track faculty at Penn Stateare ultimately judged in threecategories to get tenure —
re-
search, service and teaching. Inother words, student ratings
count
By Becky
Bellville
Knight Ridder NewspapersSpring break is a time for col-lege students to take off withfriends to exotic locales. Andsummer vacations often findthem at full-time jobs or intern-ships, or traveling overseas.Winter breaks, however, donot receive as much attention asother vacations. Students use thistime for overseas travel, stayingat home and anything in be-tween, and the length of winterbreaks varies from about twoweeks off to a luxurious fiveweeks.Many students spend this time,which
usually starts
about a weekbefore
Christmas
and lasts intoJanuary, with family and oldfriends."I love
my
winter breaks. I getto hang out
with
my
friends
nearhome and
my
family after
a
longdrought of not seeing them,which
is
a
huge
phis,"
said FrankYang, a sophomore at the Uni-versity of Michigan.Evan Ewers, a freshman atAmerican University in Washing-ton, D.C, is looking forward tohis first trip home since August"I'm from California, so it's areally long way,' Ewers said.
"I'll
have my car and I'll be able tosee my friends, (who) didn't getto go away to school, and myfamily."
J
^?
At Drexel University in Phila-
w
delphia, all breaks are aboutthree weeks long.
This
is
because
Drexel's
calendar operates year-round,
in
Quarters rather thanthe
t
radi (ion a I
semesters.
Eric
Flvnn, who is in his thirdyear at Drexel, has simple plansfor his winter break."Absolutely nothing,"
Flynn
said. "Just stay home and enjoy
it.
However, not everyone plansto stay home. Philip Dobbyn, di-rector of the Customer ContactCenter for the Internet travelservice Student-Universe, saidthat while students tend to gohome for winter breaks, manyalso go to warm
places
like Flor-ida and Cancun, Mexico."We try to go somewhere ev-ery winter break," said
David
Ellis,
another
freshman at Amer-ican, who plans to go on a Car-ibbean cruise
with
his family. "Mysister is in graduate school" sowe both have time off.Chris Allen, a freshman atMichigan State University, saidhe may go to California with hisfamily, but he also said thatspending a lot of time
with his
family was not necessarily posi-tive.!"I like to see them, but I lovecollege so much," Allen said."They get on my nerves fast"Some students will use vaca-tions to escape from their fami-
lies.
University of Michigan soph-omore Nathan Palstad plans to
•* f
Til*
go to the University of
Illinois
for a five-day conference orga-nized by the
group
InterVarsityChristian Fellowship."It is nice to go home andspend time with my family, butsince I wouldn't be working, two
weeks
is a
long time
to spend con-stantly with your family," Palstadsaid.During his last winter break,Michigan student Yang, who isfrom Massachusetts, went on aski trip to New Hampshire withfriends and plans to do
it
again.American
I
niversitypopho-
more Izzy
Bodian, whose par-ents recendy bought a house inNicaragua, plans to visit peopleat the Nicaraguan hotel whereshe interned last summer, shesaid.Bodian said
she
usually spendsher breaks in "really weird plac-
es,"
like
he i
high school springbreak trip to Pans.Dobbyn said students oftenspend part of their winter breaksin Europe, sometimes visitingfriends
who are
studying abroad."Students are spending timeseeing the sites and enjoying thelifestyle of places like London,Paris and Amsterdam," he said."They've probably done the
s
beers
on the beach' before, andwant
a
little
something different."However, he
said
winter breaks
still
tend
to be
more low-key thanOther breaks.
"With
springbreaks, the expectations are notto go home, but to go crazy."Summer trips are much long-er and overseas. Winter breakhas far fewer people traveling ingroups, versus summer andspring breaks where studentstravel together."Of course, there's always theold standby of using a break toearn money.
1
wers, the Ameri-can University
reshman,
 said heprobably would do clerical workfor his mother's import-exportwarehouse over his winter
break"It's
really easy and they pay
me,
so
I
don'tcomplain,"
he
said.
Information from Police and Safety
1.
Parking Lot
#2,
the underground
parking
ramp, the
rules
still apply even thoughstudents are on break
because
the
faculty still need
to
park there.
2.
The
parking
lot behind
the
Student
Union will
be
closed off because of a Christmasparty
on
Dec.
19,2003. 1

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