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The Merciad, Feb. 18, 2004

The Merciad, Feb. 18, 2004

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The Merciad, Feb. 18, 2004
The Merciad, Feb. 18, 2004

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929VoL7
The
Merciad
is also available atmercia&mercyhurstedu
NEWS:
Guerriero wins
EricBarr
Award
forPhoneathon work.
PAGE
3
FEATURES:
Steven
Porter runningfor
Congress in the
3rd CongressionalDistrict ofPennsylva-nia.
PAGE
4
OPINION:
Madam
Malarky
and the drunkenquery.
PAGE
6
ARTS&
ENTERTAINMENT
Kevin De
vine, leadsinger ofThe
Miracleof
86,
releases a
new album.
PAGE
8
SPORTS:
Women's hockeyremains perfect inCHA.
I
PAGE
12
Upcoming
Campus Events
Film: Monty Python and theHoly
Grail |
Mary D'Angelo Performing ArtsCenterWednesday,
Feb.
18,
at 2
and 8p.m.Mercyhurst Jazz
EnsambleMary
D'Angelo Performing ArtsCenter 1Thursday,
Feb.
19,7:30
p.m.
Food
for
FinalsStudent UnionSunday,
Feb.
22,9
p.m.
M
en's
club hockey
gameMercyhurst
Ice Center
Saturday,
Feb.
21
at
7
p.m.
Last home game
of the season
Index
News
A
1
National News
2
News
fe
y 3
Features
4
Features
5
Opinion
..-• 6
Opinion.
'
A&E.
8
A&E.
;,.
9
|
,
10
11
faculty.
MSG
By Kelly
Rose DuttineNews
editorThe debate over semesters
vs.
tri-
mesters is really
heating up
the
coldwinter
days
on
campus
lately.Last
week,
TheMerctodiL-ponedtimt
the Presidential
Task
Force had vot-
ed
on
a
plan
to introduce a
four-cred-
it semester system as
the best option
for
the academic calendar
at
Mercy-hurst
The
Presidential Task Force
was
setup to investigate options for a newacademic calendar when the recentMiddle States report suggested thatMercyhurst switch from
trimesters
tosemesters.Many different faculty membersand different academic departmentson campus have diverse opinionsabout the
possible
change.Associate Professor of the Mathe-matics and Computer Systems de-
partment, Dr.
Charles Redmond, fa-vors the four-by-four semester sys-tem.
"I
see the four-by-four system as
an
answer
to
problems we have withthe current system, because
it
offersefficiency anddepth,"said Redmond"Efficiency is the hallmark of the
four-by-four."
Redmond would
like
the opportunity
to
get
more in
depth
.with
his
classes
during the term andthe extra time with a four-by-foursemester system would
give him
andother professors that chance.Redmond believes that the four-by-four
system
would
be more
efficientfor faculty members because theywould
be
teaching three classes whilestill having two terms, instead ofteaching four classes,
like
on
a
typi-
cal
semester system. Redmond
said
that it is not that faculty does notwant
to
teach
more
classes.
'Teaching
six classes [each year]
Students
and
facultymembers
may'
soonexperience
a
change
inthe aca-
demic
cal-
endar.
The Arche-
ology
De-
partment
has con-
cerns aboutswitching
tosemesters.
instead of eight provides more op-portunity
to
stay professional
and
beactive within
our
own disciplines, andthen we can bring that excitement
into the
classroom,"
said
Redmond.
"That's
easier to do when you areonly teaching six courses."Other departments and professorsfeel differently from
Dr.
RedmondAccording to Dr. David Living-ston, President of the Faculty Sen-ate,one department
that has
alreadyhas concerns about the proposed| change is the Archeology
Depart-
mentThe department did not wish tocomment on a possible switch tofour-credit semesters at this time
because the issue is still very
contro-versial and nothing has been final-izedAnother department
that
may pre-fer
to
keep trimesters
is
the EnglishDepartmentdue,in
part,
to their ex-tensive number of core classes. As-sistant Professor Dr. Brian Reedsaid that
some
of
the
faculty of the
English
department are not
100
per-cent behind semesters,
but
that there
are many things
to consider. "Switch-ing to semesters would
be a
challengefor
us as well as
other departments,"
said
Reed
"There are many things
toconsider."Reed himself
is
not opposed
to
theidea of semesters, but feels that itwould
be
a challenge.
|i .Mercyhurst
Student Government
also
responded
to last week's
articleby pasting
this
message on
it's screen
|name, HurstMSG: "For everyone
that
read
TheMerctetdand
is
now con-cerned about the semester
system...CALM
DOWN! People getso fired
up.
Student government willtake everyone's opinions and concerns
into
account, but since
the change
toa semester system
will
not occurun-til a few
years...when
every currentstudent
here
is already
graduated..weare
taking
the
process very slowly and
very
delicately.
Trust us....it
isn't thepressing issue that you think it
is!"
However, the change
in
academic
Re
photo
calendars could happen
as soon
asFall
2005,
affecting more than
half
of the students currently on cam-
pus
and all incoming freshmen. Jun-
iors
and
seniors will
defiantly be un-affected by the change, unless it isnecessary for them
to come
back toMercyhurst for additional classes tofinish their degree, or if they planon attending Graduate School atMercyhurst.
MSG
President David Del Vecchioalso
said,
"Student Government is
in the
process of educating ourselveson all
the issues regarding the
calen-
dar,
before
we
can effectively present
the
calendar
issue to
the
students and
seek student input"
This
spring, the Presidential
Task
Force
will have
a formal recommen-dation to make to the Board ofTrustees in the form of a proposal.
Until
then, students with consider-
ations
should talk
to
their
MSG
rep-resentative or voice their opinionsto
MSG
at
the
weekly meetings onMondays at 8:30 p.m. in MSGChambers.
MSG diversity lecture raises controversy
By
Jenny
Alien
Contributing writer
Sports.Sports,Sports.
12
There was clapping and cheering,but
also
some uncomfortable faceson Thursday, Feb. 12, in the Mary
D'Angelo
Performing
Arts
Center
as
Dr. Michael Eric Dyson took the
stage to
send a message of diversity
to the students at
Mercyhurst and thecommunity of Erie.
£Though
the crowd was sparse,
thosewho
did attend could
find a
message
to any
race, ethnic group, or person.Dyson commanded the stage
and
subject of diversity from a highlyintellectual standpointDyson began
his lecture
saying,
"if
we are going to tell the truth aboutdiversity we must do
it."
He thenproceeded
to give his take
on
the
is-
sues dealing
with diversity and affir-mative action.Diversity, according
to
Dyson,
is a
problem dealing
with "the narrow
rig-id definition
of
what
it
means to bean American,
to be
a citizen of theworld."
He
said,
"I'm
talking
aboutdiversity
across the
border and aboutour
biases and
bigotry.""I'm not creating a problem, I'm
trying to
revealone,"he continued."I'm just here to point these thingsout to you.The things Dyson pointed out in-cluded
the
terror
in America
that
is-
sues of race have given rise to aswell as the diversity problems inthings such as racial profiling andaffirmative action.In a staggering statistic related tothe
idea
of
racial profiling Dyson toldl
the audience,
"I
spoke in a prisonjyesterday that was
95%
black. Doyou think that
95%
of crimes arecommitted by black people?"
j
He continued by saying, "If wewould get free
of
this racial profil-ing we would
see that we are all
thesame.Dyson's next
topic
and the co-fo-cus of
his
lecture was affirmativeaction. He did not limit he lectureto problems of African Americansalone, though, he mentioned affir-mative action with those who areolder, with women, with differentethnic groups, and young people."Affirmative
action is
about givingsomeone a chance
who deserves
it,"
Dyson
said.
"We
should
love our
brothers and sisters regardless oftheir
color."
y'.'It's
about confronting
real
differ-ence and how America
deals
withthat difference," Dyson said
of
di-|versity and affirmative action.
These topics are not ones
that stu-dents of Mercyhurst are used todealing with and Dyson presentedthem in a very direct manner thatbrought a sense of
reality to the
sit-
uation. The
students who
attendedwere very receptive
to his
messagethough.Ricardo Aguirre was one student]
there who
thought Dyson
did a greatjob
speaking. Although
he said
the
lecture
may
have
been
unsettling
forsome,
"It
was a real treat for me atleast"
$ *
"I was one of the very few whowas able
to
see him before," Agu-irre, who
had seen Dyson
on televi-
sion
and read
his
works, saidAguirre agreed with
Dyson's
beliefsand approaches
but
said,
"With
thesituation
we are in at
Mercyhurst we
are not ready
for
a
speaker like that"
Dr.
Michael Eric Dyson speaks
to a
sparse crowd
at
Mercyhurst
on
Thursday.
His
lecture
was
sponsored
by MSG.
He
added,
"It made
people
aware oftilings they woulc I
not normally think
about."
Another student attending
the
lec-
ture
was Jessie Verbic.
She
enjoyedDyson's lecture and thought
he
wasvery energetic
about
the
topic at
hand
"l
thought
he had a lotxtf good things
to
say," she mentioned.
"1
thought it
was really cool
how
he
put
hip
hop
into
everything."
Please see Dyson on Page 3.
\
1
i
 
PAGE
2
THEMERCIAD
FEBRUARY
18,2004
>
To
EWS
Mexico City's 'Zona Rosa' is gay, lesbian district
By Laurence
Iliff
The
Dallas
Morning NewsMEXICO CITY - Amid thejumble of restaurants, discos andknickknack shops
in
the capital'stouristy Zona Rosa neighbor-hood, one small coffee shopstands out Two large rainbowflags frame a sign with the leg-end, in English, "BGay,
BProud."
An open window revealsbrightly colored sofas and metalbar stools inhabited by mostlyyoung,
same-sex
couples. Theyhold hands, drink coffee andoccasionally kiss.This open expression of theirsexuality
is
not limited to
the
in-terior of the nation's first cafedevoted explicitly o Mexico's gaypopulation.
.All
over the Zona Rosa,
in
theheart of machoMexico,youngmen
walk
arm-in-arm,
check
outpassers-by and congregate onstreet corners. Men greet eachother with a peck on the cheekin McDonalds. Lesbian couples,though fewer
in
number,
nuzzleeach other as they lounge againststorefronts."Part of what we are
doing
here
is
showing people that we
have
nothing to hide,
we
are
notdoing anything wrong,"
said
Ger-ardo Espinosa, the
22-year-oldco-owner
of the BGay cafe."This generation is unlike theothers. We watch
Will
&
Grace.'We see gay characters on"Friends.'
We're
on the
Internet,
and we absorb a
lot from
othercultures."Espinosa
sees
the Zona Rosaquickly turning into a "gay vil-lage" full of fashion boutiques,restaurants and cafes, as in theCastro district in San Franciscoor Dallas' Oak Lawn.For
now, the
area
is the
centerof
a
gay
community
that has
r
grQwn,in recent yearja}ong
withularity of American culture andglobal debate on
issues
such assame-sex marriage and gaypriests, analysts and activists said.The trend comes
on
the 25thanniversary of the nation's firstgay march, in Mexico City, wherethe City Council
is
considering a
same-sex
civil union law.It would extend some
ights
 ofmarriage to
same-sex
unions andmight pass this
year.
A
similarmeasure failed by one vote lastyear.One key element changingMexican social attitudes
is
ade-mographic shift comparable to
the
baby boomer phenomenonin the United
States
after WorldWar
II,
analysts said.Mexico's demographic bubble
of
globalized youth is coming of
age. A
third of the nation's
100
million people are
15
to
35
yearsof age. And 20 million willmove
into
that
age
group withina decade.But not everyone is crazyabout young men cuddling alongthe network of walkways indowntown's
Zona Rosa _
a Bo-hemian and
chic
enclave
in
de-cades pastIts name, "Pink Zone,"
re-
ferred to the tranquillity andglamour of an artist colony
when it
was
established 50 years
ago.
Streets are named afterEuropean cities such as Liver-pool and Prague. Now,
some
say,
its
two dozen square blocks arebecoming
more ofa
"Red Zone,"with shops selling sexually orient-ed videos, condoms and otherparaphernalia."These people bring a lot ofprostitution," said Victor Man-uel Freyre, 53, who has soldhandicrafts in the zone for 40years. A gay bar dedicated toyoung people,
El
Cabaretito,moved next door to his shopthree years
ago.
"They block thedoor,
and you catftsaY anything
.
to them because then
it
s
dis-
-•-•
b|
I-,
-
crimination.
The
gays
used
to
bemore discreet."Some business groups go
fur-
ther, saying the young men,some
of
whom they describe asprovocatively dressed, aredriv-
ing
families
and
ourists
rom
theZona Rosa.Paulo Juarez, an official
in
theZona Rosa tourism office, saidthere have been complaintsabout the show of affectionamong same-sex couples. Allhave come from Mexican tour-ists visiting from conservativecities such as Guadalajara, hesaid. None has come from thesteady stream of foreign visitors,he addedStill, Mexico remains a heavilyRoman Catholic nation wherethe clergy campaign against con-dom
use and
sex education.Pres-ident
Vicente
Fox belongs
to
theconservative National ActionParty and called one of his op-ponents in the 2000 election"mariquita," meaning "sissy."Gay youths are sometimes phys-ically assaulted by parents orclassmates.The backlash against gay visi-bility has already begun, saidpollster Maria
de las
Heras. Whilethe vast majority say that every-one has the right to his or her
sexual
orientation, she
said,
mostdon't want
to
see physical affec-tion among
gays
and lesbians inpublic, and only a
fiftl i
supportsame-sex marriage. "The visi-bility of homosexual men in amacho society like Mexico makesother
men feel
more vulnerable,and that makes their reactionsmore drastic," de
las
Heras
said."The level of homophobia weare seeing
is
intense." *In contrast, older gays andthose from Mexico's more con-servative countryside say theyfind the brashness of the capi-tal's gay young people refresh-ing-
***•
-
y ^*
'
"My generation was much
Enrollments
risdin
U.S.
colleges
By
Maryanne GeorgeKnight ladder Newspapers
Students enrolled in collegehit a record high of
15
millionlast fall, and that number
is
ex-pected to increase
10
percentin the next decade, according
to
a national study released
Feb.11.
-
;'•••:-i\
But in
Michigan, a strugglingeconomy
may
be causing somestudents to rethink their collegeplans, say officials at MichiganState University and the Uni-versity of Michigan.Across the country, applica-tions
have
been increasing for
the
last four
years
at
the nearly600 colleges that were sur-veyed for the study by theNational Association
of
CollegeAdmission Counseling, based inAlexandria,
Va
Preliminary
data at
U-M
showapplications for this fall aredown
18
percent overall anddown
23
percent among
mi-
norities.
At MSU
applicationsto date are down 15 percentfor both groups.
A U.S
Supreme Court deci-sion
in
June striking down U-M's point-based system that
gave minorities
a
boost
may
bepartly responsible for the lowernumbers, school officials say. U-
M has
changed
is
application torequire multiple essays, teacherrecommendations and otherdata, making more
work
for stu-dents.
At
MSU
students
are
now en-couraged to write anessay.
It
willbecome mandatory
in the fall
of2005.MSU is also becoming
more
competitive, discouragingsome students from applying, said
MSU
admissions director
Pam
Home.But an unemployment
ate
nMichigan
of
7.2 percent, com-pared with 57 percent national-
ly
and a fear
of layoffs
may
alsobe factors."There is a lot of concernabout
cost,"
Home
said 'Tuitionwent up about 10 percent lastfall at
MSU
and the economy
has
not bounced
back
in Michi-gan like the rest of the nation.More students and families areconsidering community collegesfor the
 first
wo years and thentransferring to
MSU"
Parents who invested their
col-
lege
savings
in
the stock marketare also not seeing the growththey
expected,
she
said.
Tuition,
room
and board
at
MSU
for the
2003-04
academic year for in-state undergraduate students
is
about
$11,000.At U-M, where in-state un-dergraduate tuition,
room
andboard is about
$
14,600, admis-
sions
director Ted Spencer saidhe
is
hearing stones from par-ents who are nervous aboutcommitting to send their chil-dren to U-M because of thesoft economy.
"We
are
hearing parents talk-ing about sending their students
to a
less-expensive
school andseeing how things work outeconomically," Spencer said.
"Even
people with
white-collar
jobs are feeling threatened.
There
is
anxiety
out mere
in themarketplace." At Wayne StateUniversity, where many stu-dents commute
to
campus
andcan
live
at home, applicationsfor the
fall
are up
30
percentoverall and
47
percent for
mi-
norities, according
to Jack
Kay,
WSU
associate provost for
as-
sessment and retention.The opening
of
wo
residence
halls
and stepped-up recruiting
I urograms at
area high schoolsand in the Latino communityhave helped boost the num-bers, according
to Kay
Fallujah's
mayor questioned by
U.S.
troops
By Tom
LasseterKnight Ridder NewspapersFALLUJAH, Iraq - Machine-gun-toting Iraqi men swarmedthe downtown streets of FalIu-jah on Monday
as
reports circu-lated that
U.S.
forces had de-tained Mayor Raad Hussein forquestioning about an assault onthe
local police
station on Satur-day."If those questions lead to hisinnocence,
then
I suspect he willbe released," said Gen. Mark
Kim
mitt in Baghdad. "If those
questions
lead coalition forces tosuspect
he
may
somehow havebeen involved in the
loss of
lifeof
25
Iraqi police service mem-
bers inside
the town ofFallujah,
I
would suspect we're going tobe holding him for quite sometime."Continuing confusion overwho launched
Saturday's
attackand who
is in
control of the
city
offer a foretaste of the messyjob that
U.S
troops
will
face inhanding over authority to Iraqisecurity forces.Iraqi guards outside the may-
or's
office said Hussein was ar-rested by
U.S
soldiers late Sat-urday night and remains in cus-tody.
Many
residents, includingthe guards, said Hussein was stillthe mayor, despite reports thathe'd resigned a few
days
earlier.Hussein
was
the town's inter-im mayor, having
come
to pow-er
when
his
U.S.-backed prede-cessor resigned
last
Novemberafter his office was ransackedand set on
 fire.
 Unlike the pre-vious mayor, Hussein had thesupport of many of the area's
tribal
sheiks.Kimmitt said investigatorssus-pect the attackers on Saturdayhad inside help, including thecutting of phone lines so thepolice
couldn
t
call for backup.
There also may have been
a falsereport called in just before theattack to pull out some of thepolice force and make the sta-tion easier
to
overtake, he said.A convoy carrying Gen JohnAbizaid, the commander of
al
American forces in the Middle
East,
was attacked near the po-
lice
station
in
Fallujah on Thurs-day.
KRT
Luis botello
Carbojal
and
his boyfriend,
Abraham
Licona Bocardo
hang
out
with
friends
along
the
pedestrian
walkways of
the
Zona
Rosa, Mexico City, Mexico
more
reserved;
we
had
to hide,"said Carlos Abraham Slim,
38,
aphotographer from the nearbycity of Puebla whose
ar
exposi-tion hangs from the
walls
of theBGay cafe. The images, using a19th century process that leavesthem bluish, are semi-erotic.
"This
is
a place where you reallyfeel free," he said.
Others
agreed."In the last
 five
 years, there isa
reer
 gay
climate
here," said
Al-
berto Ibarra,
23,
a university stu-dent drinking a soda with fourfriends in the BGay cafe. Butoutside the Zona Rosa, he said,"There is still a lot of discrimi-nation despite
the
changes."
His
friend, Guadalupe Mosco,
22
also
a university
student,
saidlesbians have
i
easier than gaymen.
"I
think
i is
easier
to be
awoman. Before
we
were lookeddown upon, but things are be-ginning
to
change."The explosion
of
gay youngpeople
in the
Zor&'Rosa
is in
parta byproduct of the free market.Tito Vasconcelos, a 52-year-old "torch singer" and pioneerin Mexico's gay movement, saidhe realized five years ago thatgay youths had nowhere to go,
as
adult-oriented bars
proliferat-ed in the dark basements of theZona Rosa. So he opened ElCabaretito, which initially of-fered theatrical skits. Gay youngpeople flocked to the club andstayed
in
nearby coffee shops orhung out on the streets. A com-peting
club down
the
block,
Celo,also
caters
to gay youths.Vasconcelos
has
five business-
es,
including a soda fountain forgay kids
who are not
old enough
"18"
to enter
a bar.
A charitablefoundation offers an accreditedhigh school program for teenag-ers who are being harassed atschool.Rather than rejecting gayyouths as troublesome, he said,business owners in the ZonaRosa should embrace them."On the surface, it
doesn'tllike theyhave
a
lot of
 pur-chasing power, because theyonly buy
a
few drinks," Vascon-
celos
said,
referring
to
soda andalcohol alike. "But they comeevery
single
day."
Further, he said, the ZonaRosa has
always
been a gather-ing
spot
for gay Mexicans, evenif they were less visible in thepast.
"I
was a fantastical place
.
and
gay people
are
part
of
heZona Rosa and
is
history,"Vas-concelos said.The transformation of thezone from artsy neighborhood
to
commercial district came with
the
opening
of
the
city's subwaysystem
in
the late 1960s, whichbrought the Mexico City massesdowntown,
he
saidArchitect and history buffEdgar
Tavares
Lopez said theZona Rosa has always been aplace to see extravagantlydressed people; a place whereeverybody somehow fits in.Through the years it drew so-called "hippies" or "punks"; now
it's
"goths" and gays;
*
VJUl
Military investigating whetherguerrillas knew of general's convoy
By Hannah
Allam
Knight Ridder NewspapersBAGHDAD,
Iraq -
The U.S.-
led coalitionls trying'to
deter-mine whether a security breachmay have led to a grenade at-tack
Feb.
12 on
a military con-voy that
was
carrying Gen. JohnAbizaid, the commander of allAmerican forces in the MiddleEast, and another top
U.S
gen-eral.Abizaid and Gen. CharlesSwannack escaped unharmedafter guerrillas
ired
ocket-pro-pelled grenades and other weap-ons at their convoy from
roof-
tops in Fallujah, about
30
mileswest of Baghdad, military offi-cials
said.
A
spokesman said itwas too early to
tell
whether the
assailants
attacked
the
convoy asa target
of
opportunity or wheth-er they had been tipped off that
,
,
••
,-
the two generals were
in it I
"Whether we can directly
link
this attack
to
any
foreknowledge
that General Abizaid and Gen-
eral
Swannack were
going
to
bethere is a leap that we are notgoing
to
make
at
this
time," saidBrig. Gen. Mark Kimmitt,spokesman for the
US
militaryin Iraq.Kimmitt said an investigationwas under
way to
ind
 out wheth-er insurgents knew in advanceof the generals' afternoon visitto an Iraqi civil defense corps
compound.
He added that Amer-ican troops returned fire andunsuccessfully pursued the at-
ta<
kers. Kimmitt said troopssearched a mosque that wasthought
to
be harboring
the
men,but made no arrests.In the past, U.S. officials inIraq and Washington have saidthat
some
Iraqis working for theAmerican military and the civil-
ian
administration may be spiesfor
the
insurgents.Meanwhile, coalition spokes-men had no comments on re-ports that Grand Ayatollah All
al
Husseini
al
Sistani, a reclusivecleric whose rulings are consid-ered law by most of Iraq's Shi-ite Muslim majority, repeated hisinsistence on direct elections ina meeting
Feb. 12
with
the
lead-er of a United Nations delega-
tion that's
in
Iraq
to study wheth-er such
polls
are
feasible by thissummer.
OS SI 1
Sistani
s
insistence on selectinga new Iraqi government throughdirect elections
ather
han
a cau-cus system proposed
by
the
Unit-
ed States has slowed prepara-tions to return control of thecountry to Iraqis
by
June 30.Fallujah is an anti-Americanhotbed in the so-called SunniTriangle area, which
is
home tomany diehard supporters ofousted Iraqi leader Saddam Hus-sein. After the attack, Abizaidand
Swannack,
the
commanderof the 82nd Airborne Division,canceled plans
to
walk into thecity and returned to a militarybase
Instead
Winter
Term Laker-InnLunchSpecials
Monday
|
^^ ^^^^
Bagel Sandwich Cheeseburger8 oz. Fruit
Cup
Curly French Fries
Wednes
Si
20
oz.
FountainDrink
20 oz.
FountainDrink
y
ling Salad
20
oz.
FountainDrink
Thursday
ITaco
Salad
20
oz.
FountainDrink
Friday
Wrap2 Cookies20
oz.
FountainDrink
Saturday
Combination SubSmall French
Fries20
oz.
FountainDrink
Students
:
Don't Forget to
6RAB
Your "Lunch
on
the
Runl
 
FEBRUARY
18,2004THE
MERCIADPAGE 3
Katie
McAdams/Photo
Editor
Senior Anna Guerriero is awared the Eric Barr award by Steve Zinram, director of theannualfund.She raised more than
$7,267
for Mercyhurst.
Another*
successful phonathon
Ambassador Anna Guerriero wins Eric Barr award
ByJonelle
DavisContributing writerSince 1980, Mercyhurst Col-lege
has held
a
yearly
phonathonin order to raise money for theschoolThe phonathon focuses onraising money for unrestrictedgifts to the annual fund, which
is money that had no
restrictionsfor
its
use. This year, the moneyraised will help provide studentfinancial aid, support the OldMain renovation, and help the
college in achieving the $300,000Alden
Challenge. $The phonathon
ran from
Jan.
18
until Feb.
5,
and
according
toSteve Zinram, director of theAnnual Fund, the results werenot disappointing. More than$90,000 was raised $ I
Students organizations
indud-
ing Ambassadors, MercyhurstStudent Government,
cheer-1
leading and dance teams, menand women's hockey,
men
andwomen's volleyball, men andwomen's lacrosse, men
and
women's
soccer,
men
and wom-
en's
golf,
rowing, softhall, wres-tling, baseball,
ield
 hockey, andthe football team
all
participat-ed
in
the phonathon.
These
groups compete againsteach other to see who can raisethe most money.
The top
fourorganizations receive a cashprize,
and the top individual
win-ner receives the Eric Barr schol-arship along with
a
cash prize.The top group receives $300,second place receives$200,third place receives $100, andfourth place receives $50.This year, the Ambassadorstook home
 first
 place this yearwith a total amount of $28,842in donations. The cheerleadersand dance team took secondplace with a total of $6,782 indonations. The men's hockeyteam took third place with
a
to-
tal
of
$5,885 in
donations, whilethe rowing team took fourthplace with a total of
$4,605
indonations.Although
not all
the participat-ing groups could receive
a
cashprize, they
all still
contributed tothe total amount of donations.
The
rest of the donationsraised
are
as follows: women'shockey, $4,495; women's la-crosse, $3,760; softball, $1,625;men and
women's-rfsoccer,
$1,605; wrestling, $1,449; men'svolleyball$1,445;MercyhurstStudent Government, $1,375;
men
and women's
golf
$1,185;women's volleyball, $1,165; foot-ball, $1,045; men's lacrosse,$1,010,field hockey,
$505;
andbaseball,
$465.
1
This year's individual whoraised
trie most
money was AnnaGuerriero. According to SteveZinram, Guerriero has partici-pated in the Phonathon
for
four
termined
to be the winner. In
2001,
Guerriero raised $620,with a
total of 24
pledges.In 2002, she raised $1,030,with a total of 27 pledges. In
2003,
she raised $4,055, with atotal of
78
pledges. This year,however, she topped them allwith $7,267, and a total of 98pledges.According to Zinram, the stu-
dents
that participate
in
the Pho-nathon use it as a way to giveback to Mercyhurst. He alsoadded that helping to build theendowment
is
what begins therelationship the students havewith the college. They get achance to understand the pro-cess of supporting the college
and
that every donation, no
mat-
ter what the size, counts.Zinram
has run
the phonathon
for the past
six years,
and he
seesthe
overall
effect the
process
hason
the
students who participate.He discussed one particularformer student, Jeff
Gold,
whoactually called from Canada to
make
a pledge
to the
Phonathon.Jeff remembered
his
experience
with
the phonathon and that ev-ery donation counts.Overall, Zinram feels that thephonathon benefits
Mercyhurst
in many ways,
and
he
looks
for-
ward
to
keeping
the
annual pro-gram running with future im-provements which will allow
more
donations.years,
and
this
year,
she
was
de-
Student Tech Expo to be held at Gannon
The first ever
NW
StudentTech Expo, hosted by the Tech-nology Council of NorthwestPa. is more than a computerevent. It is more than a show-
case
for the latest hardware andsoftware solutions. It encompass-es
all
areas of technological de-velopment and will focus on ef-forts promoting the use of tech-nology as well as demonstratewhat technology
can
and
is
do-
ing
for our region.
£
The Technology Council ofNorthwest Pa.
is
a trade associa-tion promoting the
development,
growth, and recognition of the
iiiiiiiiii
technology community in the
eight-county
Northwest region.The affiliates of the Technolo-gy Councilare:Crawford AreaPeer Professionals, Erie Net-work Users Group,
Erie
Tech-nology Management Associa-tion,and
Young Erie
Profession-
als.
 
This exciting and interactive
one-day
event
is
a great oppor-tunity for students
in
the regionto explore cutting edge innova-tions, network with leading com-
panies
and organizations withinthe Tech Council and its affili-ates' membership, as
well
as sign-up
for
a chance
to win
some fan-
tastic
gifts and prizes.The expo will be held at the
Waldron
Center,
Yehl
Ballroomat Gannon University on Thurs-day, March
18
from
10
a.m. to4 p.m. Admission is free andopen to students
of
all majors.For additional information or
to
register for this event, please
 orcontact Erica Jackson, BrainGain Manager, at (814) 451-
1172
Information provided byMaureen Nebel
To
contact:
NEWS
Dyson lecture controversial
Continued from page 1.
However,
Verbic
was disap-pointed with the attendance forthe lecture which
was
not nearlyas large as it was for the
irst
n-stallment of the
series
earlier thisyear.
"This
guy
is
huge
and
our
jschool did not take him as
huge,"she said.
"I
was really embarrassed atour school," she added because
of
the minimal attendance.The
majority
of the people at-tending
the
speech were people
from
the community of
Erie
andseveral students from Mercy-hurst. There was also a lack offaculty and administration
at
theevent"If our faculty and administra-
tors
are not supporting this then
what
are our students supposedto think?" Verbic said.Regardless
of
who was there,Dyson spoke as though
each
seatin the audience was
illed
 and
hetried
to
make everyone in atten-dance think about the topic ofdiversity and what it had to dowith theirlife.
P
Dyson
is
a renowned speaker
and
has shared his messages with
colleges across the
country. Hisstudies and research have fo-cused on topics such as race,religion, popular culture and con-temporary
crises
within the Af-rican-American community.
He has also
written six books
and is
a frequent media com-mentator as
well
as being a pop-ular speaker. His books include,"Holler if You Hear Me:Searching for Tupac
Shakur",
"Reflecting Black: African-
American
Cultural Criticism","Between God and GangstaRap: Bearing Witness to BlackCulture", "RaceRules:Navigat-ing the Color Line", and bookson the lives of Malcolm
X
andMartin Luther
King
Jr. also.
Many
of
his
books are collec-tions of essays which include avariety of topics and people.Some things Dyson has written
IMPORTANT WORK STUDYPAYROLL INFORMATION
In an effort to address the concerns of students, changes
have been
implemented regarding
the current pay
date
sched-
ule. The pay
date
of February 20 will include two pay peri-ods: January
15
thru January
28 and
January
29
thru Febru-ary
11.
A
revised schedule is available on the Laker Website.To effectively implement this change the following guide-lines
will
be
strictly
enforced:
Time sheets will be due in
Main
112 by
noon
on the
sched-
uled
submission date. There
will be
no exceptions.Time sheets submitted after
noon on
the scheduled due date,either by the student or the supervisor, will be paid on thefollowing scheduled payroll date.Students are encouraged
to erirpJliadirejCt
deposit,
and forms-.,.
Snbepicted.iip
in Room
112
Old ^ain,.
Sru#nts not
opdirect deposit
will be
required
to
pick up their checks on pay-day after 8:30 am.If you
have
any questions, please
call
Diane Rutkowski
@
2278. Thank you
for
your anticipated cooperation.
Reasons why young adults should vote
Chicago TribuneA smattering of politically pas-sionate young people and dispas-sionate numbers from surveysoffer these reasons for partici-pation, not just at polls but incampaigns too:Reason No. 1: National prior-ities. Older
voters are
projected
to
outnumber
voters
under age
30
by more than
2-to-l
on Tues-day. That means
the
generationgap in such matters as SocialSecurity might be underrepre-sented in the candidates whomvoters elect. Three out of fivepeople in their 20s, for exam-ple, said
in
a survey that SocialSecurity should be redesigned sothat workers could invest some
of
heir payroll taxes in the stockmarket.
Less
than
half
the babyboomers
and
only
one-fourth of
people
65
and older
feel the
sameway. Those data come from arecent study conducted by TheWashington
Post,
Kaiser FamilyFoundation and Harvard Uni-versity.Reason No. 2: If the nationgoes to war, the young are the
ones
fighting
it.
When
the
econ-omy takes a turn for the worse,they're
the ones
not gettingjobs.Reason No. 3 (a):
Simqne
Ward, executive director ofYoung Democrats of America,offers this tidbit gleaned fromcensus data: If
18-
to 24-year-old turnout had been just 0.3percent higher in Florida
in
2000,
Al
Gore probably would haveprevailed over George Bush.
1
Reason No. 3
(b):
For those
who
lean Republican,
a
slight
re-
vision of Reason
3
(a).on include
his essays
 from
 1989to
1993
on
igures
ike
MichaelJackson, Michael Jordan, andSpike Lee. These essays alsoaddress racism, sexism, film pol-itics and music.
His
second col-lection of essays
was
publishedin 1995 on topics such as the
O.J.
Simpson trial, the music ofMarian
Carey
and Vanessa Will-iams as well as a critique ofgangsta rap.The Mercyhurst Student Gov-ernment lecture
series
hasbrought many important speak-ers and topics to campus andDyson's speech was no excep-tion.
This year's series
began inthe fall with Notre Dame foot-ball player "Rudy" and will con-tinue with Ruthie from RealWorld Hawaii in the spring.Dyson was to be the diversitypart of the lecture for the year.
MSG was
unavailable for com-ments on the lecture but manymembers
were
in attendance in-cluding Verbic and Aguirre.
New ATMin Union
Mercyhurst College has en-tered
into a
new agreement with
PNC
Bank to provide
ATMs
on
the Erie
Campus.
An ATM
was installed in theLaker Inn and became opera-tional Thursday, February 12.An
ATM
already was in placein the lobby of the
Briggs
Ave-nue entrance to the Bookstore.
v
For the three-year
term
of theagreement,
PNC has
agreed not
to assess
a surcharge for
the
use
of
the ATMs, including the onein the Bookstore.
This is
true, even
if
you
do
not
have
an account
with
PNC.
P'ff
is
possible that your ownbank could charge
you a fee
forusing the
PNC
ATM.If you have any questions,please contact the Finance Of-fice at 824-2278.
Spring
]Break
Bookstore Hours
ThursFri.Sat.Sun,Mon.Tues.Wed.
Thurs
Fri.Sat.Sun.Mon.Feb.26
1
Feb. 27Feb. 28Feb.29March 1March 2March 3March 4March 5March 6March 7March 88:30 -4:308:30 -4:30ClosedClosed8:30
-4:30
8:30 -4:308:30 -4:308:30 -4:308:30 -4:30
8:00-1:00
Closed
7:30-10:00
T?
Interested inworking for|
The
Merciad?
Applications
will soon
be tak-en for Merciad staff positionsfor the 2004-2005 schoolyear. If you are interested,please contact Editor AdamDuShole at
EditorMerciad
©mercyhurst.edu.
iiiiiiii
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