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The Merciad, March 24, 2004

The Merciad, March 24, 2004

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The Merciad, March 24, 2004
The Merciad, March 24, 2004

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE SINCE
1929
The
Merciad
is also
available
at
merciadmercyhurstedu
NEWS:
Laker
Inn is
now
compliant
 from
 pasthealth departmentviolations.
PAGE
3
FEATURES:
Senior Art
Exhibition I
opened Saturday,
!
March
20.^-The
'}.
senior theses
will be
in
the Cummings
ArtGallery until April 9.
PAGE
4
OPINION:
Why we
still love
Play-Doh.
PAGE
6
_
ARTS& I
ENTERTAINMENT
Against
Me's
newest
album "The
Eternal
Cowboy** is released
PAGE
8
SPORTS;
• •
-13
Women's lacrosse
wins
in
front
of homecrowd.
PAGE
11
Upcoming Campus
Events
Film: The Weather UndergroundMary
D'
Angelo Performing
ArtsCenterWednesday, March
24,
at 2
and
8
p.m.Lecture:
Dr.
John Hedley
BrookeWalker
Recital Hall
Thursday,
March 25,8
p.m.Special
Event:
Academic CelebrationSunday,
March 28
- Wednesday,
March 31
See specific
times and locations on
Mercyhurst College Website.Games NightStudent UnionSaturday,
March 27,4
p.m.
Real
World's
Ruthie rocks 'Hurst
By Michelle Ellia
Contributing
writer"Be who
you
are
because
you
arewho you
are,"
said
Ruthie
AlcaideThursday night Ruthie, most
known
for
her
appearance
on
MTV's
hit
show
The Real
World,
spoke
to Mer-cyhurst
Students
last Thursday
in
theWalker
Recital
Hall.
'
In
her lecture,
Ruthie
spoke
of
herexperience with a variety of issuesthat impact our day-to-day society.
The issues
included
cultural
diversi-ty,alcoholism,and sexuality.Ruthie's
lecture was
the
inal
nstall-ment
of
this year's MSG Lectureseries.
j.
According
to
Jason Staley, MSG
Vice
President, the
MSG
lecture se-ries strives
to
provide Mercyhurststudents
with
an opportunity
to learn
things that can't necessarily
be
taughtin
the
classroom.Born in Jacksonville, Fla., Ruthiemoved to Hawaii when she was
a
child, where she grew up
in
fostercare. Ruthie then attended the Uni-versity of Hawaii, where she decid-ed
to
challenge herself and studyabroad
in New
Jersey.
The
study abroad experience gave
Ruthie
insight
into difFerent
views and
aspects
ofracism.
She
explained that
while growing up in
Hawaii
there
wasprejudice against whites and blackssimply because they were the minor-ity,
as
she went on
to
explain that in
New
Jersey
she was in
the minority.Ruthie learned
that
although peo-ple may deny that they hold preju-dice, they are
simply
unaware they
have
it,
simply
because
everyone has
it
t
V i
S
Ruthie stated that prejudice is
a
characteristic that
has
been embed-ded in our society.
As
a
society we
categorize
everything.She
went
on
to
say that we catego-rize things
by
color, by brand,
by
make.
We
use the method of cate-gorization for everything whether it
is
merchandise
in
a store or people.Ruthie added
say
that although
peo-
ple
are
different;
we are
fundamen-tally
the
same.
With
an analogy,
Ruthie
comparedthe diversity
of
people
to
music.Music comes in all different stylesand genres and
is
made
up
of
dif-
ferent lyrics and beats, but in
the
end
it is
still
music. People
also come
indifferent
shapes
and colors
and
are
made
from different cells,
but in
the
end we are all
people.Along with diversity, Ruthie alsobriefly touched
on
sexuality.
She
talked
about
her first experiencesthat
led
to her self-realization thatshe
was
gay. She explained that whilegrowing
up in
Hawaii, homosexuali-ty was looked
upon as
a disease, andwas not
a
lifestyle that was widelyacceptedWhen Ruthie first began to learnof her homosexuality she becamedepressed and confused because
of
her feelings. Afraid of
what
her familyand friends would think, Ruthiestayed
in
the closet.
After
transferring to New Jersey,Ruthie felt more comfortable withhersexuality.After coming
out to
herfriends, Ruthie gained
the
courageand
self-confidence to tell
her fami-
£
I
When
Ruthie came out to
her fam-ily, she expressed her fear but wasglad
to tell
that her family acceptedher
for
who she
was.
Last but notleast, Ruthie expressed that
she
doesn't preach her homosexuality,
she just
hopes that world can becomeaccepting
of who
people really
are.
Ruthie also addressed an issue thatremains close
to hen
alcoholism.
For
those of us
who watched Real WorldHawaii, the image
of
that
 first
 epi-sode
remains
clear
in
our minds.Ruthie, her
eyes
rolling back intoher head, was rushed away to thehospital for alcohol poisoning. These
were real
life images.Ruthie discussed that her troubleswith alcohol began
in
college. Ruthieexplained
that binge
drinking was
a
problem while
she was
in college.
She
assumed that everyone who drank
Katie McAdams/Photo
editor
The
site
of
the new
Picnic Park, the senior class gift.
Seniors
plan
to
makepermanent mark
By
Jonelle Davis
Contribul
Index
News
.1
National
News
»
2
News
31
Features
4
Features
5
Opinion
6
Opinion
'
A&E.
8
A&E.
9
|
10
11
Sports,
Sports.Sports.
12Every year
the
senior
class
at Mer-cyhurst
College
presents
a
gift
to
theschool.
The
gift
is
presented with
the
over-
all
purpose to leave
a
piece of that
class
behind when the
seniors leave
and
begin
their
lives
in
the real
world.
This year the senior class will
be
building
a
picnic
park area betweenthe apartment buildings located
at
3907/3909 Briggs Ave.
and
3908/
3910 Lewis
Ave.The area
is
currently used for
rec-
reational purposes,
but with a
make-over students will
be able
to
have
the
use
of a pavilion and other new fea-tures.
I
In order to have
a
senior gift,
the
senior
class
had
to
form a commit-tee of students willing to put timeand dedication in
to
raising moneyfor
the
gift.
This
year the committee is madeup of six seniors including RachelConfer, Anna Guerriero,
Josh
Hack,
Franc esc
a Ravasio, Justin Shouse,
and
Lisa
Foery.
<P
According
to
Josh
Hack,
a mem-ber of
the
senior giftcommittee,thecommittee wanted
to make
sure that
the
gift would
be
something
that
stu-dents, faculty, and
alumni
could
uti-
lize.
I
£j.
"Just by
location, when they redothat area,
it will
be a
fun
hang-
out
place right
in the
middle
of
campus. It can be used for every-
thing
from
a chill
spot
to
reunions."
Please
see
Gift
on
Page
3.
Ruthie from MTV's the Real World Hawaii spoke to students abouthomosexuality, race
and alcohol.
was an
alcoholic.When Ruthie turned
21,
she ex-
plained
that she
felt
as if she were on
top of the world. The lure of clubsand alcohol took a hold of her andshe felt invincible.
When
she joined
the
Real World castin
1998,
Ruthie's drinking
habits
be-
gan
to spiral
out of control,
so much
that her roommates kicked her outof the house.
:This is
when Ruthie began
to
seekcounseling.
She
explained
that she
hastaken back control
of
her life.
She
learned
to
do this by setting limitswhich include moderation and respon-sibility.
: She
stressed it
is
acceptable to goout and
have
fun, as long
as
we areresponsible
and set
limits
for
our-
selves.On a final note, Ruthie concludedher lecture with
this
statement:
"Be
safe, have fun, and step out
of
yourcomfort zone. Take advantage
of
your
college
experience!
As
collegestudents we have
an
extraordinaryopportunity
to
make the best out
of
our lives."Ruthie was able
to give students
a
first hand account
on the
importanceof not
only being ourselves but
alsoon being responsible. Her account wasnot only interesting
it
was inspirational
to all who
attended.
Enrollment
is
up
for
class
of 2008
By Lindsay Clark
Contributing writerThe number
of
applications
for
admissions to Mercyhurst College
is
rising, according
to
Robin Engel, Di-rector of Admissions. The big ques-tion is what does that mean
for
theMercyhurst
community?
• '&
Last year, Mercyhurst College ac-cepted
1,900
students and
has alreadyaccepted
2,000
for
next year.
The
college's
goal
for freshman is far lower-
700
- about
35
percent to
37
per-cent of those actually accepted.Engel explained that if more than
700
students choose to attend Mer-
cyhurst,
the
school then takes the
first
700
money deposits that come into
the school
The dance department
can
only takea limited number
ol
students. Otherdepartments do not have that prob-lem,
Engel
explained.
Instead of im-
iting
the number of
students that can
be accepted
into a
department,
Mer-|cyhurst
will
expand
that
departmentby hiring more
staff,
gaining moreresources, technology and materials
to increase the
department
to
providefor the increase
in students into
thatdepartment,
Engel
said.In a recent survey by the
National
 Association
for
College Admission
I
Counseling,
it was
found that
76
per-
cent
of colleges surveyed receivedmore applications
in
2003
than
in
2002.
Engel thinks this is due to
a
national increase
in
the number
of
students that want
to
attend collegenow, because
the
number
of
highschool
gn ds has
increased
as well
asthe number
of
perspective
college
students.However,
he also
feels
that
there
is
more of an increase
in
the
western
FOe
photo
Robin
Engel,
Director
of
Admissions
UnitedStates,
more
thanOhio,Penn-sylvania,
and
New York where
the
numbers
have
not increased
as
dras-
tically,
f I *
He thinks the increase in applica-tions
to
Mercyhurst is due to other)factors -
the school is
becoming
bet-
ter known, and
is
more competitive
now than
ever.
With the recent increase in appli-
cants has also come a
higher standardfor acceptance
since years in the
pastHigher
grade point averages
and
SAT
scores
are
now
expected.
The aver-age
SAT
score among applicants
is
currently around
1098,
increasingnearly
20 points
over
last year's
aver-age
of
1080, and the average gradepoint average
is
now
3.5.
Due to this increase in workload,the admissions office has
added
astaff person,
it
does more
of
theirwork via computers, such
as
withtheir automated applications,
and
works much
harder,
putting
in
more
I
hours.
Continued on Page
3.
i
 
PAGE
2
THEMERCIAD
MARCH
24,2004
To
contact:
EWS
Nations,businesses, volunteers battle
AIDS
inAfrica
By Marilynn Marchione
Milwaukee Journal SentinelKAMPALA, Uganda - Goatsand chickens
scatter
as a
dirt
bikepings down ruttedroads,pastbanana
trees
and sugarcane, toa village deep in the Africanbush.
Its
driver
is
delivering
some
of
the world's most advanced drugsto people in mud-and-thatchhuts.Once a week he visitsthem, making
sure
they
are
fol-lowing the complicated pillschedule.
[i;
He brings something just asprecious
as
the medicine
in
his
backpack.
He brings hope that Africa'shorrific
AIDS
epidemic can beturned
back.
Every day on the continent,
6,000
people die because theydon't get
drugs
that make AIDSsurvivable elsewhere.
Bu
that
is
changing.An unprecedented amount ofmoney and
effort
is flowing into
Africa
as
powerfulpeople,busi-
nesses
and
nations try to end thiscalamity.President Bush is promisingbillions; Microsoft's
Bill Gates
is
giving millions;
ormer
 PresidentClinton
is
negotiating cheaperdrugs; and the World HealthOrganization is aiming to get
them to
3
million people by the
end
of
2005.
INews of the epidemic in Afri-ca dominated a recent U.S.
AIDS
conference normally de-voted to domestic concerns.Africa also is doing more tohelp
itself.
South Africa'sgovern-ment just pledged to get drugsto all who need
them —
a
stun-
ning
reversal by leaders
who
foryears had denied that a virus,
HIV
even
causes
the
disease.
KRT
School children near Entebbe, Uganda, take part in anHIV prevention class.
As
a result
of
all these efforts,limited quantities of
life-savingAIDS
drugs are slowly becom-ing more available across thecontinent in what amounts
to
thebiggest
public
health experimentin history. The drugs must betaken
exactly
as
prescribed—no
sharing,
splitting
or
selling
doses
-
or
resistance
can
develop
in as
little as two weeks.
If-that
hap-pens, new viral strains will]emerge, making things worse.
Ye the
dirt bike program andother pilot projects show success
is
possible.
AIDS
originated
in
Africa andhas long had its worst impactthere.
§jf
Nearly 30 million
Africans
|have
HIV
- the population ofWisconsin, New
York
and Mas-sachusetts combined. Infectionrates are as high as
40
percent
in
some African countries. Near-
ly 20
million Africans
have
diedofAIDS,
and
more than
11
mil-lion children have lost one orboth parents
to
it.But Africa and its problemsseemed remote,
and
it
was
hard
to see how
to solve them. There'sno
vaccine
to
defeat AIDS, andno cure, only expensive drugsthat
must
be taken for
a
lifetime.
However,
a
new attitude seems
to
have taken
hold:
Do
what
we
can
in Africa because
we
no long-er
can
do
nothing.In all of Africa, 4.4 millioncritically need
AIDS
drugs butfewer than 100,000 get them
now.
There
are three main ways:from an employer, from medi-cal studies like the dirt bike
project,
or
by paying
$25
to $30a month for
the
cheapest gener-ic drugs available, sold fromtreatment centers
like this
one.
Now
a
fourth way
is
emerging- programs that
give
the drugsto the public for free or with asmall co-pay. The
humanitariangroup Doctors
Without Bordersis doing this in scattered sitesaround
die
continent,
and the
Bill&
Melinda
Gates Foundation
and
the
Merck
Foundation havedonated
$50
million
each
to
ex-pand a program
in
Botswana.But these are limited efforts.Doctors Without Borders hasabout
6,000
people
in
treatment;
the
Merck-Gates
program aims
to
treat 100,000,
al in one
coun-try.
}
KRT
CDC
worker Polycarp Omaset, right,
brings AIDS drugs
for Christine Athieno
to
her
Ugan-
dan village. Athieno is raising six
children,
two of her
own
and four
rom
 her brother andhis
wife
who
died
of
AIDS.
To
go beyond
that,
many arelooking to
Bush
and
the
GlobalFund to Fight AIDS, TB andMalaria - an international fundcreated by private and publicdonors that's affiliated with the
United
Nations, heavily financedby
the
United States, and head-ed by health secretary Thomp-son.The deaths
hit
hardest on the
11
million African children havelost
one or
both parents to AIDS.Other diseases or causes haveorphaned another
23
million.Already, 12 percent
of
all Afri-
can
children are orphans. Many
will
be orphaned again
when
thepeople who stepped in
to
takecare of them die of AIDS, too.Many of these orphaned chil-dren
also have
HTV.The
very
notion of family hasbeen reshaped by AIDS, whichhas claimed much of Africa's
middle-generation and
left the| young
artO
the old
to
take
carer
of each other. It's not uncom-mon to see one person raisingsix or seven children, the re-mains of several different fam-ilies.
"There
is
no
 fixed
 outer
limit
to the
concept of extended fam-ily," the latest UNICEF reporton the situation says. "Familiesare splitting and reforming indifferent ways in response to
more
stressful circumstances."
In
the worst cases, there is nofamily, and orphans
live
on thestreets.These children fall
into
prosti-tution, street
crime
and
child
la-bor
Their descent often beginsbefore the parents die, as thechildren drop out of school tonurse sick parents and do dan-gerous and desperate
things
formoney
as
the family becomesprogressively poorer.
"There's this
major debate go-
ing
on about what to do aboutthe orphans," said Diana Au-bourg, special assistant to thepresident of the Pan African
Children's
Fund.
In
a
sheet-metal-roofed schoolwith window screens that looklike chicken wire, children
are
learning the
ABCs of AIDS
pre-vention. "Say no to sex untilmarriage!"
they
shout,
prodded
by
their teachers.
5]
i*
Actually, these students at
Nkumba
Primary School nearEntebbe, Uganda,
are
only learn-
ing the
"A," for abstinence. Sec-ondary
schools
advance in thealphabet
to
"B,"
which stands forbe faithful to your partner ifyou're having
sex.
Some also
teach
"C,"
but condom
is
a
wordthat many
don't
think
should beuttered
in
school.
The
epidemic
in Africa
has al-
ways
been
largely
spread throughsex between
men
and women,unlike
in
the United States whereit began, and
irst
 spread,
among
gaymea
A
variety
of reasons have con-tributed
to its
explosive growthin Africa, including the sheerlength of
time
the disease hasexisted there.
"Intergenerational
sex," as it is euphemisticallycalled,
is
an enormous problemthat victimizes
many
children.
So
are harmful
beliefs,
like the myth
that having sex
with
a virgin
will
cure a man of AIDS. And it iscommon for African men towork
far
away
 from
heir fami-
lies
for
long
stretches
and
havesex with prostitutes or otherwomen.
Condoms
aren't widely
accepted.
Measures
to
prevent a disease
that
is
primarily spread throughsex
will always
be
controversialbecause of attitudes, beliefs andcultural
taboos
around
sex
itself,
health
experts say."This is a disease that is 100percent preventable
and
yet wehaven't
really
treated
i
that wayfrom the beginning of
the
epi-demic," Gerberding said.Now, "the genie is out of thebottle with
this
disease,"
she
said.
And without a
vaccine or
a
cure,"prevention
is the
only choice wehave,"
Palestinians vow revenge for Hamas founder death
By
Michael Matza
and Soraya
Sarhaddi NelsonKnight Ridder Newspapers
GAZA
CITY,
Gaza
- Palestin-ian militants promised cata-strophic
revenge
on Monday for
the
Israeli
assassination of SheikAhmed Yassin,
the
wheelchair-bound founder of
the
extremistIslamic group
Hamas
who
waskilled at dawn as he returned
home
from morning prayers.Hundreds of thousands ofPalestinians _
equal
to
the pop-ulation of Gaza City _ turned
out
for Yassin's
noon funeral, anoutpouring so great
that
the
tra-ditional paying of respects to
Yassin's
family, which ordinarilywould occur
at
his home, wastransferred
to
a large,
walled
soc-cer stadium."If Sharon thinks he killedHamas by killing Yassin, he'swrong," said Khaled Kafarna,
41, a
Hamas
fighter who claimed
to be
on
Israel's
wanted
list.
"Heplanted the seeds for 1,000Sheik Yassins."
In
Israel, police battled spon-taneous
Arab
anger and bracedfor attempted suicide attacks.Crossings
to
the
West Bank
andGaza
Strip
were sealed and
se-
curity was stepped up at busstops,
malls
and other gatheringplaces.The
US
Embassy
in Te
Avivurged Americans in Gaza to
leave "as soon
as
they
can
safely
do so."
Americans
in
Israel
wereurged to
avoid public places
and
large crowds. "The killing of
Ahmed Yassin
has dramatically
escalated
tensions," the statement
said,
warning that "some Hamas
leaders have alleged that theUnited
States
implicitly support-ed the killing of Sheikh Yassinand have vowed revenge."
US
officials in
Washington said
they had no warning of the as-sassination. After
irst
 decliningto criticize Israel's actions, the
White
House
said
it
was
"deeply
troubled"
by
Yassin's
killing.
Yassin's
assassination leaves
a
temporary leadership vacuumfor
Israel's
most deadly adver-sary, but whether
the
attack
will
benefit Israel was hotly debated.Israeli Interior Minister Avra-
ham Poraz
chastised Prime Min-ister
Ariel
Sharon for "starting avery problematic cycle."But others supported the de-cision to kill Yassin, saying itwould prove
to
Hamas
that
ter-
ror doesn't work. "If you giveterrorists immunity and if theycan get what they want, it en-sures terrorism forever," saidDan Schueftan, a senior fellowat the University of Haifa's Na-tional
Security
Research Center.Yassin
was the
most prominentPalestinian leader killed
by
Isra-el in three-and-a-half years offighting, and his assassinationseemed certain
to
fuel the eye-
for-an-eye struggle
of bombingsand assassinations. Some mourn-ers suggested Hamas' next
tar-
get should
be
Sharon.Volleys of crude
al Qassam
rockets were fired against
Israel
throughout
the
day and Israeliarmored vehicles moved intonorthern Gaza late Monday tostop the attacks.Across the Lebanese border,Hezbollah militants pledged toratchet up their
attacks
againstIsrael, exchanging
 fire
 Mondaynight with the Israeli military,which sent aircraft into southernLebanon to hit what it called"Hezbollah targets."
jw
"Sharon has signed Israel's
KRT
Palestinians
Una
the streets
for
the
funeral of Hamasleader Sheikh Ahmed Yassin during his funeral In Gaza
Strip,
Monday, March 22.
death certificate," warned one
Gaza
mourner,
Abu
Mahmoud,
46. He
said
his 19-year-old sonhad
been
killed in a confronta-tion
with Israeli
troops.
Several
Cabinet
members said
the
decision
to
target Yassin
had
been made months
ago,
but
Is-
raeli media widely
eported
 Mon-day that
the
strike
had been
ap-
proved during a security Cabi-net meeting after the March
14
twin suicide attacks at the Ash-dod seaport, which killed 10.The decision
was
apparentlyfar from unanimous.
k
6r
Mars oncehad shallow
seas,
scientists say
WASHINGTON -
A
Mars
rover has confirmed that a shal-low sea of rippling saltwater once
 flowed
 slowly over at leastone
place
on
the
surface of
the
red planet.The historic discovery by
the
little
robotic explorer Opportu-nity significantly
increases
the
chances that life
may have existedon another world
besides
Earth,
NASA scientists said
TViesday.
"We
think Opportunity
is
parked
on
what
was
once
the
shore-line of a salty sea on Mars," said Steve Squyres, lead scientistfor
the
rover project.
"This
was
a habitable environment," he
declared.
The latest
evidence
was
found
in
a
rock
outcrop, nick-named
"Last
Chance," on
the rim
of a small crater where Op-portunity landed
two
months
ago.
The
rock
was
composed
of
irregular, tilted layers of sandy sediments, called "cross-beds,"which
are
formed only
by
ripples
in
moving
water."These are sedimentary structures
just like
we see on Earthalong
a
beach or
creek,"
said
Dave
Rubin, an independent
ex-
pert
a the US
Geological
Survey
in
Santa
Cruz,
Calif.,
who wasasked
to
review the
NASA
scientists' findings.John Grotzinger, a member of the rover team from the Mas-sachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge,Mass.,said
the
Martian
sea
must have been
at
least
two
inches
deep, possi-
bly
much
deeper,
and
lowed
t the
rate of about one
mile
perhour.Just
three weeks
ago,
rover scientists announced that
Oppor-
tunity had found evidence that a rock called
E
Capitan had
once
been soaked with
water.
A
that
time, however,
they could
not
tell
whether the water had been
sitting
on
the
surface of theplanet
for some
time,
or
was
merely moisture percolating throughunderground
rocks
and soil.
"Is the
difference between water
in a
well
and water you
can
swim
in"
said Squyres,
a
planetaryscientist from
Cornell
University
in
Ithaca, N.Y.
The
new evidence
settles that
question, but
still does
not
showhow
deep
or
wide the
sea was,
how long
i
lasted,
and whether
such bodies
of water existed elsewhere onMars.The scientistshope Opportunity, its twin,
Spirit,
which
is
working
on
the otherside of the
planet,
and future
Mars missions will provide
someanswers.Opportunity
is
already moving to
a
larger,
deeper
crater,
namedEndurance, where the team hopes
to
get
a
look at
10
or more
layers
of ancient sediments, instead
of
just
the
one
i has
exam-ined
so
far.
The
scientists
acknowledged that
the
presence
of a
sea doesnot prove
that life
ever
arose
on Mars. But they pointed
i
>ut thatsedimentary
rocks
can contain traces
of
past
biological
activity."These rocks are good at preserving evidence of
microbial
life,"
Squyres
said.
AMn/bprwldedbvKKT
v
 
MARCH
24,2004THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
How to land
a
perfectsummer internship
ByKateBaumann
Contributing
writer
,su
You want an internship this
**** *~ ive no idea
where
seniorajjfeadby Old
Main
!
4i
on your
way.
J
Many
Mercyhuist students will-
be interning this summer, mostlikely
in
their home towns.
But it
seems
that
inding
 out how to
goabout getting
an internship
some-
times holds students
up.
•**?
]Fear
not,
ifs a
simple, painlessprocess that will be no where
. near.as
brain wracking
as it may
v
tf
irstappear.
X
Frank Rizzone, who's beenworking
in
the Career Services
office for
over
10
years,
gave
full
details
of the process.
?
First,
it's
in your best interest
to
attend a Co-Op/Inforrnation-
al
Session. This
is
where the
ap-
plication process is explained andinformative papers
are
distribut-
ed,
along with other helpful start-
ers.
Check the listings of datesand times
for
the meetings
in
thesecond floor hallway of OldMain or
call
extension
2426.
In this meeting, you will re-ceive an application form inwhich
you must
ill
 out and
haveapproved
by
your academic ad-visor and the chair of your de-partment. Once this
is
accom-plished, bring the form to Ca-reer Services. They will then
make the
.resume
for
you. whichmay just be one of the bestthings Mercyhurst
has to
offer.
'from
that day on, your re-sume
is in the
files of
the
officej for
good.
This makes your fu-
ture resumes
that much simplerbecause even after
you've
grad-
uated you can come back to
Mer-cyhurst The office can
look
youup
and
can easily update youralready stored resume foryears.
At
this point, the staff in
Old
Main
204 will
point you in theright direction. Hundreds of in-ternships are
listed in
their hallunder each major. If you don'tfind something that interests youthere, inform someone in theoffice and they'll lead you to
pages
and
pages
of other com-panies they have had studentswork with before.
One
thing
Rizzone wants
anyprospective intern to avoid istrying
to
ind
 an internship with-out making
sure his
office
hasn't]
dealt with that particular com-pany before.This is just a benefit for youand makes the process
that
mucheasier
in the long
run.
"We
don't want the studentswasting theirtime.
Check in
with
us to
see if we've ever been as-sociated with them before you
go
knocking on doors," said Riz-zone.
A
question that most collegestudents
want to know
is,
'Will I
be paid? Roughly
50 to 60
per-cent of the internships are onsalary.
If you know
you
want
to
be
paid,
make sure to
only applyto ones that fit that criteria.
The
average salary
is
between
six
and
eight dollars
an
hour,
de-pending
on
your major. Moreimportantly,
all
internships canbe used for credits. Career Ser-
vices helps
all students
to
set-upcollege credit for internships.Once you've applied
and
beenaccepted
into
your internship,your employer
registers
you af-ter
its
final approval from yourdepartment Within the
irst
wo
weeks of
the
job,
you'll list goals
with
your on-sight supervisor inwhich
you
get graded
on by
thatsupervisor and by someone inthe Career
Services
office.Landing an internship
on
your
own
is practically
a
full time
job,
but with a
little
help for CareerServices you can easily be onyour way
to
an exciting experi-ence
in
the real
world.
Enrollment is up for new students at the
'Hurst
Continued from Page 1.
The Ambassadors Club hasbeen expanded
for next year
dueto the increase in the number oftours
they
will be giving per year.
Engel
explained that freshmanhousing does not appear
to be
aproblem because Mercyhurstaverages about 16 percent offreshman that do not return tothe college due to family prob-lems, money issues, unhappinesswith the school or because theyflunked out. This drops thenumber of students that contin-ue
on
and need further housingneeds. However,
he
also notedthat as far as upperclassmenhousinggoes,there
will be a
fewmore apartment complexes that
will
be purchased by Mercyhurstfor next year to help with anyhousing problems the collegemight encounter.
Datfrig's
hottest trend: hooking
ByJennifer
Knight Ridder Newspapers
This
year,
George
WashingtonUniversity junior Sarah Wilsonwas ecstatic to
come home
overwinter break. That's when thematriarchs of her house; Mom,Grandma
Anna
and Aunt Beat-rice would
comer her to
ask thequestion they
always
asked.
Aunt
Bea would
get
a devioustwinkle in her eye, she would
purse
her
lips
and
then
ask withher smokers rasp, "Sarah dear,have you met any nice youngmen at
GW?"
In times
past,
Sarah would sigh
and say with a
disappointing tone,
"I have
a
lot of guy
friends." But
this
winter break
was
different."Well, its funny
you
should ask.The truth
is,
I've been hangingout
with this
guy Trevor
a lot inthe
past few weeks."Response: Confused looks,cocked heads; the women ex-changed glances."Hanging out?" Grandma
Anna
asked."Yeah, you know, we
do
stufftogether.""Stuff?"they asked
in
unison.
"Is
Trevor your boyfriend?
Are
you
going
steady?"
w'\
Sighing exasperatedly Sarahrolled her eyes and said finally,
"We've
hooked up
a
few times."Puzzled, they twitched ner-vously.
-;"What
do you mean you've
N
hooked
up?"
Sarah let her
head
fall
into
hercrossed arms on
the
table.
No,
it's
not like "meeting
up,"
which is the best response 70-
year-old
Josephine Taylor couldcome up with when she wasasked what she thought "hook-
ing
up"
meant.
!^"I
know young people
use
this
term when
they are
talking about
being with someone romantical-ly.
1 just
think that I'm
too
old tounderstand
I
he details," Taylorsaid
Most college
students are at aloss for words when asked todefine
this
recent phenomenonof mating. But the bottom line
is
hooking
up has
replaced
dat-
ing-
Why?
The necessity of attend-ing college today has most
18-
year-olds
completely relocatingand living independently, usual-
ly
away
 from
 home,
for
at leastfour years.
Perhaps a
product ofliving away from parents duringthese
early stages
of adulthoodhas caused romantic relation-ships to change drastically aswell.
I
There seems to be
no generalconsensus on what hooking upactually is, although there issome consistency.When Wilson was asked
to
giveher idea
of
what "hooking up"means,
even she
could only
pro-
vide a vague, loose frame: "Ithink
there are
different degreesof hooking
up,
the
most
excep-
tional
one
being when you pick
up a guy at a bar and you arewasted and
go
home with thatperson.
It
varies,because then
it's
also hooking up
if
you do itconsistently
with the
same per-son that you know pretty well,
but
you have
no
established ex-
clusive
relationship."Hooking
up is
definitely based
on a
scale,"
Wilson
said.OK, this tells us when hook-ing up occurs, but when twopeople are involved
in
the act,they aren't just
talking
ordanc-
ing are
they?
"It's getting
together on a sex-ual level without commitment,or without labels.
This can range
from
making out to
having sex,"Wilson
says.
To Eugene Valos, a sophomoreat the University of Rhode Is-land, "it's something you can't
show
on network TV."The young person's dating
game
has
changed so
much sinceJosephine Taylor and GrandmaAnna were a part of it. Fiftyyears ago
most
of hese women
did not
go
to
college, and
if
theydid,
it was
never
in such
a co-edenvironment
and the
now-com-mon occurrence of a
room
fullof unsupervised 19-year-old
girls
literally
living
next door tofive guys was unlikely.
The
formalities of
going steady
and
having
an established rela-tionship prior to any physicalrelationship
have
been replacedby the
vague concepts
of "hang-ing out" and "seeing each oth-
er.
1
»
"I tried to explain that Trevor
and I had
been hanging
out,
that
this
meant we were interested inbeing more than just friends,"Wilson said. "The confusioncame when my grandmothercouldn't understand how twopeople could kiss and be inter-ested in each
other,
and spend alot
of
time alone with each oth-er, without having any sort ofstatus."At a table tucked away in thepopular
pints-and-burger
hang-
put
Lindy's, longtime friendsTodd Rubin,
Carly
Green andAmanda Bowers discuss the top-
ic
"It's kind of
sad, but
it's so
typ-
ical for a relationship to buildonly after two people havehooked up consistently for awhile," Bowers
said
with
a
wist-ful
sense
of pessimism.Green disagreed: "I thinkhooking up with someone first
is
such
a
better
idea
than draw-ing
lines
and
deciding you want]to date them
right away.
You
can
get a sense of the
person
in their
kiss.
How
can you
tell
if a rela-tionship has potential if there isno chemistry on
a
physical lev-
el?"
i
?Today's levels
of courtship aremarked by ambiguity with no
real
distinction
in
the word "dat-ing."
i
""Dating' can mean anythingfrom having casual sex to totalexclusivity," Bowers said. "Iwouldn't
say my
current
"hook-
up buddy' and
I
are dating be-cause we don't really ever goanywhere....
We
talk;
we
watchmovies;
we hook
up."
7b
contact:
EWS
Laker Inn Violation Update:
Laker is now fully compliant with Health Department
By Marc To
th
Contributing writerBack in October, the LakerInn restaurant received non-critical violations in three sec-tions of an inspection by theErie County Department ofHealth. [Getting those violations cor-rected was started right away.When asked how serious theviolations were, General Man-ger
Ted
Foesset said,
"We
takeeverything seriously"Since October2003,the Lak-er Inn has been fully compli-ant in carrying out the five cor-rections ordered by the ErieCounty Department
of
Health.The initial inspection showedthat the Laker Inn needed to
refinish
or replace cuttingboards, which had become toodeeply grooved. Because bac-teria
can grow
in these grooves,the cutting
boards were
replacedto avoid contamination.In other cases, there werecleaning issues that had to beaddressed. Vents and ovenhoods
in
the kitchen had accu-mulated dust and grease, andthe ceiling
tiles
had also accu-mulated
dust
and grease
to
thepoint where it was possible itcould fall
from
the ceiling.In order to ensure that thisproblem was taken
care of
andprevent recurrences, a privatecompany
has
been contracted'to clean the vents, hoods, andintakes once a year. Whenasked if these yearly cleaningswould be enough, Foessetre-sponded positively, saying, "Insome cases that [the grease]takes several years to buildup."In some cases the problems
KawMcAdafns/PtKXoecJrtrx
The Laker
Inn
corrected
Its
Health Violations
right
away.
that were cited were simple
is-
sues that would only take a dayto resolve.
In
one instance, the bagel ovenwas loaded with crumbs. In thisinstance
all
that was required wasa
simple
cleaning.The pop cupboard was stickyand needed to be cleaned, andthe problem was fixed almostimmediately. The managementof the Laker Inn also took stepsto ensure that this problemwould not repeat itself while therestaurant was under renovationduring December of
2003
whenthe tubing for the fountain ma-chines was run under the floorand into a store room, allowingfor easier, safer cleaning and
maintenance.
These renovations also in-creased the size of storage andfood preparation areas,
which
jmakes
it
much easier
for
theres-taurant's staff to ensure that ev-erything
is
clean arid in
its
prop-er place. Before these renova-tions the storage and food prep-aration areas had been far toosmall
for
the number of mealsthat were being producedThe Erie County Departmentof Health inspected the build-ing again after the renovationswere completed in early Janu-ary, and there were no prob-lems at that time.Foesset expressed a high re-gard for the Department ofHealth, noting that
its
purposeis to help
make
a business runsafely and smoothly.When asked how the safetyprocess is handled
on
a day-to-day basis,
Foesset
said,
"We
kindof inspect ourselves... it's anongoing process." He also ex-pressed that in order
to
be suc-cessful, a restaurant must ded-
icate
itself to cleanliness saying,
"You
really have to look at itevery day... that's the nature
of
this business."Foesset also expressed a firm
belief that
the Laker Inn wouldpass
inspection,
should one
hap-pen in the near future.
Gift
committeexolleicts
from
Con
tinuedfrom
page 1.
According
Hack,
the commit-tee started out with a goal to
raise more
money than
the
pre-
vious
senior
class.
"All of the seniors have anoption
to give
their housing
de-
posit, which
is
$250,
to the se-nior gift fund. There
is
about30 percent class participation indonations
to the
fun, which wehope
to
increase."The committee has managedto raise a total of $8,271 to
date.
Fundraising efforts in-
clude two
parties, including the
100 days
of graduation.It
is
not too late for
seniors
todonate to the senior giftfund. The committee
will
con-tinue
to
take donations and fund-
raise until
graduation.
There will also
be an informa-tional meeting for seniors
to
dis-
cuss
graduationissues,includingthe senior gift on Thursday, April1, at 8:30
pm
in
the
Walker
Re-
cital
Hall.
^
__l@B^Ki@CHMBe)Wt the gif^-Sd
nior Kate
Paone
said, "I thinkit's a real good idea especiallyduring the spring and summerjwhen everyone
wants to be out-j
side.
I
think
this
gift
is
good
be-
cause more people
will use it
andit will be more functional than!decorative which is always
a plus
on
this
campus.
I
haven't mademy donation
yet,
but
I definitely
plan to
in
the future."Senior
Adam
Lewis
also
addedhis input about the gift by say-ing,
"I gave to the
fund because
I think
 ft
s
important
to give
backto the institution that
I've
spent]four years
at.
I
think
it will
be
a
good place for future studentsto meet
at
because like
it
existson
this
campus."This year's gift
will
be the
fif-
teenth gift presented
to
Mercy-hurst from
the
senior
class.
Thefirst gift, the stained glass win-dow
in
the Mercy Heritage room,was given in
1989.
This
gift
be-
gan a
trend for
classes to
follow.
JPhe-rtearofWO created^he£fass
or"
1990
scholarship fund,the
class
of
1991 gave the clock
in the Carolyn Herrmann Stu-dent Union, the class of 1992gave the gazebo at the studentunion,
the class
of
1993 gave
thepiano
at the
student union, theclass of
1994
gave the class of
1994
scholarship fund and theclass of
1995
gave the stainedglass window
in the
MercyhurstStudent Government Chambers.The
class
of
1996 gave
librarybooks, the class of 1997 gave
the Munson Park
Plaza, the classof
1998 gave
an unrestricted gift
to
the annual fund, the
class
of'
1999 gave
the renovation
of
theGrotto bridge,
the class
of 2000gave the patio at the Student
I
nion, the class of
2001
gavethe Mercyhurst Rock at the en-trance, the class of
2002
gavethe Mercy Cross, and the classof
2003
gave the Alumni park.
Spring
has sprung.
Your
winter
coats
and bulkysweaters are in the way now. Bring
them to
ParisCleaners to
be
cleaned and we will
keep
them instorage thru the summer for
free.
You don't
haveto pay for the
cleaning
until next fall either.
*
?aris Cleaners
w
4025 Pine
Avenue
.
!2
5-2177
K
-i
..JUIHW

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