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The Merciad, Jan. 19, 2005

The Merciad, Jan. 19, 2005

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The Merciad, Jan. 19, 2005
The Merciad, Jan. 19, 2005

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER
OF
MERCYHURST COLLEGE SINCE 1929
Res Lifeworks
for
students
By Jason EndressContributing writerWhile there have been rumors thatfemale students will
not be
placed
in
basement apartments
in
the future, thisis essentially unfounded.
nf
As mentioned
in
last week's article,there
is
not, nor
will
there be
any
policyprohibiting females from living
in
a loca-tion of their choice, basements includedcollege officials said.
Housing,
as
students
are well
aware,
is
determined by a
lottery.
While
this
doesmean that choices can become limited,students have
as
much
choice
as possiblegiven the circumstances.During selection, students
are
madeaware that they have chosen
a
base-ment apartment,
and if
students wishto change their decision,
or
move laterin the year, every consideration
is
givento them.
"1
think the college
is
more commit-ted
to
making
the
campus safe ratherthan prohibiting living
in
basementapartments," said Laura Zirkle, Directorof Residence Life.Zirkle pointed
out
that
the
HousingDepartment will move students
if
theyare unsatisfied with their living arrange-ment, but
added,
"sometimes
they haveto make
a
choice," meaning that
adif-
ferent
apartment could very well
be in
a
bad
location.As many
are
aware, the most identifi-able safety issue
is the
accessibility
of
student housing; propped doors
are
oneof the major threats
to
student
safety*
,
"Far
more
of a
threat
I
think,
thananything else," said Zirkle. To counterthis risk
as
well
as
others, Police
and
Safety foot patrols have been increased
recently
and the
campus
is
constantlyre-examining the lighting system.The camera system
is
monitored regu-larly by
Police
and Safety, and
as
Zirklenoted, Maintenance has been especiallyquick
to fix
broken doors
and
otherproblems.Both Residence Life
and
Police
and
Safety are always looking
for
"new
and
effective
ways
to
address
the issues." saidZirkle. The campus' reaction
to
attacksand problems is based foremost on
the
speedy dissemination
of
information.
Please
see
Res Life on
Page
2.
With
ethiCS
(McQufflen
[namedinterimpresident
By
Jon ell
e DavisNews editor
File
photo
Dr. McQuillen
Katie
McAdams/Pholo
editor
factured
under human rights.
Mercyhurst Bookstore works
to prevent
human
right
violations
By Jen Helbig
Features
editor^
When
you
go
to
a
hockey game, there'snothing else like being
a
Mercyhurst fanand letting everyone know
it
Even though
you are
surrounded
by
ice,
you
keep toasty warm. Maybe
it is
all
of the
warm bodies jumping
and
cheering around you,
but
maybe
all of
the warm clothing you ate wearing
has
something
to
do with it
as
well.
You are
decked out
in
a new greenzip-up hoodie and
a
pair
of
grey sweatpantsthat
you
bought from
the
bookstorewith your last paycheck.
You
probablydropped
the 60 or so
dollars
on
yournew outfit without even glancing
at the
tag
to
see where it
was
manufactured.In
fact;
the only
time
you
might look
at
the
tag will
be in
a
few
weeks
when yougo
to
toss it into
the
washing machine.However, what
if you
checked
and
found that your garment was manufac-tured
in
Guatemala, Honduras, Mexicoor China?What
if
there
was a
tag on
it
that said,"Made
in
slavery?"Luckily,
no
Mercyhurst bookstorecustomer will ever need
to
worryabout checking
the
tags again, becauserecently
the
administration, along withDan Cullen,
the
bookstore generalmanager, agreed
to
sign Mercyhurst
on
as
a
member college
in the
Fair LaborAssociation,
or
FLA
for
short.As
a
member
of the
FLA,
the
book-
store
can
live
up to the
Mercyhurst
|
mission statement
in
guaranteeing that"the
values
of
truth, individual integrity,human dignity, mercy,
and
justice,"
are
upheld through its actions.Sometimes students would like
to
hide
in
Mercyworld
and
pretend thateveryone
in the
larger world
is
treatedequally
and
fairly; however, this
is not
always the case. As illustrated in the lastweek, Mercyhurst will
do
whatever
it
can
to
avoid being associated with
any
human rights abuses.To start, education
is a
key
for
every-one
to
understand
the
problem
of
human abuse. Sweatshop
is
appliedas
a
blanket term
and is
frequentlymisused.
Please see Bookstore on Page
3.
'Hurst celebrates
the
lifeof Martin Luther King
Jr.
By
Zoe
ContesContributing writer
Katie McAdams/Pnolo editor
The breakdancers
In
the
PAC
celebrated Martin Luther
King
Jr.
Mercyhurst College students
are
encouraged
to
pay tribute
to the
legacyof
Dr.
Martin Luther King
Jr
by
par-
ticipating
in
activities
Sunday, Jan,
16,through Thursday, Jan.
20.
The celebration
gives
students
and
fac-ulty alike
a
chance
to
honor
King's
lifeand
accomplishments
not
only duringthe national
holiday,
but
also
throughoutthe week.The celebration began Sunday,
Jan.
15,
at the
Performing Arts Centerwhere many gathered
to
listen
to an
Interdenominational Gospel Concertperformed
by the
Martin Luther KingHoliday Choir.
The
event, which
was
organized
by
Diversity
101,
received
a
turnout the club was pleased with.On Monday,
Jan 17, Rev.
MartinLuther King
Jr.
Day was
observed
as
a national holiday. While
all
over
the
nation people paid tribute, Mercyhurststudents, faculty and administration didthe same.For many,
the day
began with
a
breakfast served
in
the Mercy HeritageRoom that
was
held in honor
of
MartinLuther
King
Jr. Diversity
101
sponsoredthe event where students, faculty
and|
administration were among around
75
people who attended.
Please see 'Hurst on Page
3.
On Friday,
Jan.
14 the
Mercyhurst Col-lege Board
of
Trustees announced thatDr. Michael
J.
McQuillen, former VicePresident of Aca-demic Affairs anddean, would takethe position
of
interim presidentof
the
college,once Dr. William
R Garvey
retireson
Feb. 23.
When asked
to
discuss his future
"""""
35
presidency, McQuillen first said he washonored
to
accept the position.
"I
am
honored that the board and MercyhurstCommunity has chosen me and hope
I
do
not
disappoint
9
'
"I
am
gratified
by the
support
I
havereceived from
the
community
and
willdedicate myself
to
working with themto ensure that Mercyhurst continues
its
growth toward
a
recognized college,"said McQuillen.When asked about his
goals
during hisinterim presidency McQuillen stated,"My goal is
to try and
help
the
collegefocused
upon
our
primary mission
by
giving quality education
to
studentsand creating
a
wonderful atmospherethat prepares
for
a bright future.
I
willprepare
for the
incoming long-termpresident
so
that they will
be
able
to
come
and
lead Mercyhurst
to the
nextlevel."
5 »
McQuillen
also hopes
to remain teach-ing
at
Mercyhurst but
is
dedicated fullyto his new
position.
"I hope
to
(continue teaching),
but
convinced myself that
in the
first
few
months
in
office
I
must focus
on the
presidency,
and in the
fall
I can
teachone course," said McQuillen.According
to a
press release obtainedfrom
the
Mercyhurst College Website,Marlene Mosco, chair
of the
Board
of
Trustees, feels that
Dr.
McQuillen
is
perfect
for
the position.
"Dr.
McQuillen epitomizes the words,
'scholar
and gentleman,'" said Mosco."He
was
attractive
to the
boardbecause
of his
background
as a
seniorfaculty member with extensive senioradministrative experience.
He is
wellrespected
by the
faculty,
administration,
staff and student
body,
and
his
appoint-ment should create
an
almost seamlesstransition
in
leadership
at the
college,"said Mosco.
I
In the
press
release, Mosco
also
addedthat
"Dr.
McQuillen understands
the
Mercyhurst culture and the board found
his college
record
of
experience in bothteaching
and
administration,
as
well
as
his personal qualities,
to
be compelling asour leadership choice
for
this transitionperiod
at
the
college "
McQuillen will begin
his
presidencyat
the
beginning
of
spring term
on
March
7.
He will continue
to act as
presidentuntil
the
board selects
the
next perma-nent
president,
which will take approxi-mately
12
to
18
months.
Please see McQuillen Page
2.
QJ
Ol
News
Is there too much lead
in the
water you're drinking?
Students
test water fountains aroundcampus.
Page
2
Mercyhurst
e-mail
capac-ity was originally
set too
high.Fixing the problem may affectyour account
Page
3
Opinon
•Thoughts on President
Garvey's
pending retirement
and
his
newlynamed temporary
replacement..
Page
6
Arts
&
Entertainment
•Ani
DiPranco
releases
her new
album "Knuckle Down." For the firsttime DiFranco
is
collaborating withother artists.
Page
8
Features
Try the
Anime
club
for
some
cultur-
ally unique
fun.
It's
a great way
to
meet creative students.
Page
5
Sports
I
Men's volleyball sweeps a pair fromvisiting Clarke University
to
open
up
MVA
play.
I
T |B
i
Page
10
IndexNews..
£....2
News
3
Features............
4
Features
...5
Opinion
»
6
I
Opinion
....»,.
7
I *...|.8....y..I...u
9
L lo
A&EI
A&E
SportsSports
Sports
1112
AI
 
PAGE
2THE
MERCIAD
January 19,
2005
To
contact
EWS^
Too much lead
in
Mercyhurst
drinking water?
Students test water fountains around campus and results show high levels
By
Joshua
Wilwohl
Layout assistantDr. Thomas
Spudich's
chem-istry of life classes thought itwas going to be just
another
experimentThey were to fill a glass withwater from the many drinkingfountains found throughout cam-pus and measure the amounts oflead within each cup.The results, however, wereshocking."There is a large fluctuation(of lead) between the buildingson campus that are suppliedwith water by fountains/* saidSpudich. Large indeed.The results of the study placedOld Main's first floor west waterfountain at .04 points per billion(ppb) as compared to Zurn's firstfloor fountain at
6.12
ppb.Now, before eyes widen at thedifference, according to the En-vironmental Protection Agency's(EPA) guidelines for drinking
water,
a
concentration of lead
be-
low
15
ppb is considered safe.Spudich, though, said that doesnot
matter.
"Zurn is roughly 10 timeshigher than others (drinkingfountains) around
campus,"
Spudich said.
c<
We
need to beConcerned with this because oflead
pipes,"
Spudich said that the pipespumping water to fountainsaround campus could containdormant water that is pulling inlead as it
sits,
eventually dispers-ing the contaminated water tothe fountains.
Zurn's
second and third floors,though a bit lower from the firstat
2.45
ppb and 4.05 ppb, respec-tively, are still high, compared toother campus locations.Spudich's chemistry of lifeclasses sampled 44 water foun-tains ranging from Old Main tothe Hirt Building
-
with Baldwin
Hall's
basement floor landingthe safest spot to drink wateron campus at .02 ppb, followedby the west fountain on the firstfloor of Old
Main at .04
ppb,
andthen
Zurn's
third floor refrigera-tor at .13 ppb.The Athletic Center's rightfountain comes in
at
a mediocrenumber of 1.55 ppb and thelibrary's third floor at 1.13 ppb.But, Zurn's floors rank as the alltime high.Even though there is a large
difference
between the amountsof lead found within the water,according to Spudich one wouldhave to consume gallons of wa-ter to become sick or to noticeany symptoms of illness."It is not hazardous to yourhealth per se," said Spudich."It's hard to predict unsafe,since everyone's safety level isdifferent"
-,
VEven though these numbersmay be below EPA standards,some students are still concerned.Freshman Lindsey Smith is upsetwith the results of the test andfeels that something should bedone.
"My
high school had thewater fountains checked for leadevery year and put purifiers onthem to protect
us,"
she said. "Itis really dangerous for studentsand for the environment"Spudich agrees. "We shouldconsider placing filters (on thefountains) or check the pipesdepending on the use of thatwater fountain," he said.However, some students, suchas junior Chris VanHorn havefew concerns about water safety.
"They
wouldn't let us drink tapwater if it wasn't safe," saidVanHorn. "If it is not going tokill me tomorrow, I am going todrink it"Lead within the water maynot kill, but in some cases itmay cause severe sickness andlong term disability. Accordingto the
National
Safety Council,"Drinking water can
some-
Headaches aid memory lossWeakness
In
feetloss of appetiteNausea and vomitingHighbfoodpi
\
Sleeping difficultyWeight lossDecreasedsex drive•Confusion[SimonsConvulsionsParalysisLearrw^ difficultiesHyperactivity
Lead affects many areas of
the
human body.
times contribute to elevatedblood lead levels.The EPA has estimated thaton average up to 20 percent ofa child's total lead exposure canpotentially be attributed to lead-contaminated
water"
Initial
symptoms of such leadpoisoning are flu like and thenprogress to nausea, abdominalpain, weight loss and irritability.Spudich says the lead foundwithin
Mercyhurst's
water supplyis not high enough to producesuch effects after consumption,but he is taking no chances. Hesubmitted the water report to su-periors
chemistry director, Dr.Ronald Brown and Director ofAcademic Affairs, Dr. ThomasGamble
for further review."It (the report) is interestingand somewhat indicative of thethings that could be done to helpimproveZurn,"said Brown.When it comes down tochoosing where to grab a quickdrink of water, rethinking beforedrinking may be the best idea."I would not chooseZurn,"said Spudich, who is gettingwater from the refrigerator thatcontains a filter. "I would chooseOld
Main
 
he said.To see the full report, go to
and click on news.
Portraits of the sisters of Mercy have disappearrd
By Katie
McAdams
Photo editorby 3 feet," said Sr. Geri. Shereported the picture missing tocalled walking through the hallsof
Zurn
and noticed that anotherIt seems that Mercyhurst has acase of art theft on its hands.
Believe
it or
not,
since Septem-ber two portraits of Sisters ofMercy seem to have disappearedwithout
a
trace.
,.
... .The portraits, which hadbeen donated to the college, weretaken from the Student Unionand Zurn Hall.The first missing picture
was
anenlargement of
a
photograph onthe cover of Mercyhurst Maga-
zine,
containing Sister CarolynHermann, for whom the StudentUnion is named.The seventh president of Mer-cyhurst, Sr. Carolyn had herpicture taken with the first groupof men that attended Mercyhurstand it had been hanging in theUnion since the building's dedi-cation in 1990.Sr. Geraldine
Rosinski
was thefirst to notice that the picturewas missing."This enlargement of
a
picturewas not small, it was about 2 feet
Katie
McAdams/Pholo
editor
Many portraits like
this
are missing around campus.
Police and SafetyA week later, Sr. Geri then re-portrait was missingThis painting was of Sr. MaryCharles Weschler, a Sister ofMercy who is a member of theBoard of Trustees and still livesat the Motherhouse.The portrait had been paintedfor Sister Mary Charles as anaward from the Mercy Centerof Women in 1997 as one ofthe 12 people that they honorannually.
.
K
/
'
Jj
ifien, Sr. Mary Charles re-ceived her portrait as a gift fromher nieces and nephews; she de-cided to donate it to MercyhurstCollege, where she completedher undergraduate degree andeventually taught for more than30 years.The college then hung thepicture in front of the chemis-try department for Sister Mary
Charles'
love and passion of sci-
ence,
as she founded the scienceprogram at Mercyhurst and waschair of the departmentSister Geri asked around Zurnto see if anyone knew of thewhereabouts of the portrait ofWeschler.Kathy Thornton, who was asecretary in Zurn in the begin-ning of the school year, posteda sign in place of the missing
portrait,
which says to contacther to in regards to its disap-pearance.Director of Police and Safety
Ken
Sidun has not had any leadson the missing portrait case thus
far.
I
i P f
iS*
"Someone could have easily
r
have
hid it in their shirt, or placed
it
in
bag,"
Sidun said.Police and Safety could not tellfrom their
cameras
in
the
StudentUnion or
in
Zurn who took theseportraits."Depending on how they tookit out, our cameras would not beable to catch it," said Sidun.No further investigation aboutthis crime has taken place be-cause there have not been anyleads to this case.Police and Safety has a tip lineset up where anyone with anyinformation can report an anony-mous tip about the portraits orany
crime.
Police and Safety willfollow up on any tips that theyreceive.In the meantime, Sr. Geri stillhopes that the portraits will bereturned."It would be a welcome sur-prise that they have been returnto the right place, and I still livein
that hqpp,
#
\^Jioever
has
taken
these portraits
has
removed,
partof the history and the imagesof two of the last sisters whosepresence
was
significant"
said
Sr.
Geri, with a teary expression.Despite the lack of informa-tion on this case, whoever tookthese portraits is asked to pleasereturn them to their rightful spotin Zurn or the Union.The portraits not only hold asignificant part of
Mercyhurst^
history, but also are a largesymbol of the accomplishmentsof those Sisters of Mercy whoproudly stood within them.
Religious studies department takes studentsto Europe to explore their classes first hand
By Jaime MyersContributing writerHow does traveling to Europewith your friends and earning sixcredits sound? To
22
Mercyhurststudents, it sounds pretty good.Students ranging from sopho-mores to seniors are takingadvantage of study abroad op-portunities within the college.Dr. Daniel McFee, Dr. DavidLivingston and
Dr,
Mary Hem-brow Snyder are traveling withthe students for one week eachin Rome, Italy; Dublin, Irelandand Oxford,
UK-
Students will receive creditsin both Social Ethics (taught byMcFee) and Western ChristianHeritage (Livingston), which aretwo core courses.Classes will meet once a weekduring this spring term, thenlearning
will
continue on locationfrom June 9
30,In Europe, classes will meetfor about three hours a day, thenthe group will go to a variety of
sites
to learn more about bothcourses.All 22 are enrolled in both class-
es,
they will travel together andlearn about the same things.And yes, they will be tested.Students will receive one-thirdof their grade during the springsemester.And the
3-hour
seminars andfield trips they will
take will
all
bematerial that will appear on theessay tests.Mercyhurst has never done atrip like this where students cantravel and receive class credits.McFee and Livingston startedplanning last summer, and theyhave been working hard oncreating this opportunity forstudents.
"The
administration is verysupportive and the students areflexible," said McFee. "We havea great group of people. Thestudents are wonderful at work-ing with us because it is our firsttime and we are trying to feel ourway through
it/*
There was a good response tothe trip. Some students are on awaiting list hoping that someonedecides not to go,Students like
Kayti
Ostromeckiare taking this trip as a way tocatch up on credits."The most convenient thingwas that I am going to Australianext year for four months, so Iwill be missing a few credits,"said sophomore Ostromecki."So with this trip, I am able toget ahead by two
classes.
This trip will be a perfectway for students and faculty tomeet on new levels. And theycan make other connectionsthroughout the world.Ostromecki also said she has apen pal from Italy, so this is theperfect opportunity. "He agreedto come meet me somewherewhile I'm there. I have been talk-ing to him for
a
few
years
now,
sothis is a really big deal."Each city
was
picked speciallyto relate to the college and eachof the
classes.
Rome is the birthplace of Western Christianity.The group will be staying in amonastery and will visit the Ro-man Ruins. They will also visitthe Vatican to do a field study.Next stop will be Dublin, theworld headquarters of the Sistersof Mercy. They will make somecontacts with the Sisters ofMercy there and hopefully havea service learning project.They will be visiting Glendal-ough, which is an ancient CelticChristian monastery south ofDublin.
T
Lastly, they will travel to Ox-ford because of its academicexcellence. They will visit aBiotech Center to study issuesfor the ethics course and theywill also travel to London to seeWestminster Abbey and
St,
Paul's
Cathedral.The group will also sightseeall the exciting and famous tour-ist attractions. They will hire abus for a couple day trips out ofthe cities.Globalization will be the mainfocus of the Ethics course. Stu-dents will be able to see threedifferent cultures and see howthey are all the same.
McFee's
example: look up andsee Westminster Abbey. Thenlook right next to it and see aStarbucks.McFee says he hopes that thiskind of experience will becomesomething regular that Mercy-hurst will offer."Hopefully we are paving thegroundwork for other profes-sors to set up trips with coursecredit"Mercyhurst offers
a
number ofstudying abroad opportunities,but they are all through otherschools.This type of trip will keepthe credits and courses internalwhile still having an abroad ex-perience.
McQuillen named interim president
Continued from Page
L
McQuillen
has
been with Mer-cyhurst
since
1971.
Some of hisachievements include serving
as
Vice President of Academic Af-fairs of the college from
1988-1994,
Associate Dean from
1994-1996
and Dean of
librar-
ies from 1999-2002, working asa former director of the historydepartment, and of the EganScholars program, chair of thedivision of social sciences, andserved on the president's cabi-net for eight years.McQuillen was also co-chairof the 1992 Middle States
Self-
Study Evaluation team andreceived the prestigious 'Teach-ing Excellence Award" fromthe college in 2003 by vote ofhis peers in recognition of hiscommitment to the teachingprofession and for upholdingthe highest standards in educa-tion as
a
master teacher and rolemodel at the college.
••••
AQU^AUIRBRONZE
5fe5y*.
«H
 fetch
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January 19,2005
THE
MERCI
AD
PAGE
3
7b
News
SAC
provides^
activities! for
students
Can you count the asses? Students enjoyed a
funfilled
night of Donkey Basketball
with
SAC. Don't miss ComedianEddie
Ifft
on Jan 21 at 10 p.m.
In
the Walker Recital Hall and Fiesta Night on Jan. 22 from 10 p.m. until 12 p.m. in theUnion.
Vandalism on
'Hurst
campus?
*
Hurst limits
e-mail
storage space
By Josh WestContributing writerSome students may unknow-ingly have surpassed the storagelimit for their Mercyhurst
e-mail
accountOver the summer, Informa-tion Technology became awareof a number of students whose
e-mail
storage capacities hadbeen set at 250 megabytes (MB),much higher than the prescribed20MB available to mostThe 20MB limit applies tototal storage space of all of fourmessage folders within a student
e-mail
accountAll students
also
have access toan additional 500MB of storageaccessible through the campus
<
H
y
drive. If an account is
dis-
covered to be in excess of the20MB
limit,
all folders will becleaned out and relocated to the
'H'
drive in a text format.The cleaned out
e-mail
willbe replaced by a message fromSystems Administrator LorraineFrownfelter, who will help stu-dents to recover anything thatthey want from the
'H*
drive.
Frowrtfelter
will temporarilyincrease available storage in or-der to simplify the recovery andreinstitute the 20MB limit oncea student has secured any neededmessages or attachments.
'1
will usually give students a
week,
and then we bring the limitback down." Frownfelter said.Students whose
iles
 have beenmoved can reach Frownfelter atcampus extension 3360 or by
e-mail
at
1
vandyke@mercyhurst.edu. The process is simple andno data will be lostPat Benekos, Director of In-formation Technology, has
rec-
ognized the problem."We realized that it was ourerror. The limits should nothave been set that high," Benekossaid.The accidentally high limitsare being discovered on a case-by-case basis, so some studentsmay still be subject to a changein their accountEven those who have gottenaway with the higher limit foryears need to be aware that theymight lose
die
majority of thatspace.Students in excess of their20MB limit can fix the problemnow by deleting old messagesand attachments or moving themto a new location, such as apersonal hard drive or the cam-pus
'H*
drive. Picture files areespecially large and moving ordeleting them can free up a greatdeal of space.*Rectifying the problem nowrather than waiting for a problemto occur can help make the ad-justment
less
of a problem.Frownfelter and the IT staffare available to help any studentwith concerns about their cam-pus
e-mail
account
!^
Bookstore
promotes human* rights
By Heather
Huesdash
Contributing writerMercyhurst students experi-enced car vandalism firsthand inthe Briggs parking lot on
Satur-
day, Jan. 15. The person respon-sible for the vandalism has beencaught and will pay the damagecosts for every vehicle.
js
At least
our
 cars were
targeted,
all with the same damage includ-ing mirrors smashed or brokenoff. All had the damage done tothe same mirror.These cars were all parked inthe top half of the Briggs lot,and the owners all found theircars in this state the followingmorning.According to Deanna Kramer,whose car was
vandalized,
theincident was more irritating thananything else.
"If s
more of an inconveniencethan anything. Now I have todeal with getting it
ixed.
t's
justannoying/' Kramer said.The school can monitor crimeslike these through surveillancecameras, but they
are
not respon-sible for the price of vandalismincidents on campus.The name of the individualis not being released, but he isbeing turned over to the EriePolice Department When askedabout the
incident,
Police Chiefof Police and Safety Ken Sidun
said,
'It's
unfortunate. The
of-
fender
was
a young man
who
hadbeen involved with alcohol. Heis a freshman from a college inOhio who was visiting someoneat Mercyhurst"
"He has
criminal charges beingpressed for four of the five carshe damaged. He will be paying
well
over
$
1,000
dollars in fines,"said Sidun.
Residence life
works
for students
Continued
rom
 Page
I.
Though specific action de-pends on the nature of the at-tack, all problems are addressedin a crime alert, which gives thestudents as much informationas can be accurately given. The
alerts,
said
Zirlde
are intendedto "get information to studentsas fast and as comprehensivelyas we can."Zirlde stressed that both thestudents
9
physical and emo-tional safety were of the utmostconcern and that Residence Lifedoes all it can to
^minimize the
ii
-«
trauma"
Residence-life
has
a
Continued
rom
 Page
1.
There is nothing wrong withwomen,
men or
even teens work-ing at
a
clothing factor)' in
a
thirdworld country, as long as theirjob complies with the minimumwage and workers' rights laws intheir specific country.In fact, without these "sweat-shops," many third world coun-tries would lose a main force intheir economy, and employeeswould be left jobless.Bookstore general managerDan Culler recognized thatmany misunderstand the term"sweatshop."
|"I
think sweatshop has a differ-ent meaning to different people,"Cullen said."I don't think that the FLAis demanding they get paid thesame minimum wage (as inAmerica), but that they are givena fair working environment thatis non-threatening"It would be next to impossiblefor Cullen or any other Mercy-hurst employee to travel to eachindividual clothing factory toevaluate the
safeness
and fairnessof the working environmentThat is where the FLA canstep in.
.
i^f-
Cullen said, "They seem toreally have a handle on what isfair within those countries. Eachcountry is a litde different Forexample, their religious beliefsdictate what they can and can't
do.
It's pretty
impreslive
howthorough the FLA
is."
Until about a week ago,the only safeguard on wherethe clothing came from wasthrough the National Associa-tion of College Stores(NACS).Mercyhurst has long been amember of
NACS,
which in thepast had played the role of beinga watchdog for clothing goinginto college stores; however, itwas not the main role of thatorganization.Mercyhurst will not terminateits affiliation with the NACS.Being a member of
NACS
con-tinues to be beneficial because,according to Cullen, it "is
a
hugetool for the bookstore industry.We get to compare ourselvesto the other ones. We're rankedin efficiency on this side of thecountry at number
16.
We
ate an
independent,
Mercyhurst-ownedbookstore where a lot of collegebookstores are operated by out-side corporations."You may wonder if the compa-nies that we buy products from
are
members of
the
FLA,
why
dowe need to go through the effortto become members also?Cullen said that the companieswill come to Mercyhurst to selltheir products, and the
irst
hingthat he will
ask is
to see their codeof conduct However, the onlyway to really know that their codeof conduct is being enforced isif Mercyhurst is proactive andstays on top of them through athird-party organization such asthe FLA.
if*
'They (NACS) went throughsome changes in the past twoyears with new board presidentsand in certain areas they havetaken their focus off. They aretrying to cut expenses in certain
ways.
This is an issue that was ingreat debate and then once theFLA was virtually doing whatthey wanted, they didn't wantto have an in-house police staffgoing around to
all
these compa-
nies.So,
since
the FLA
is
doing
it,
that's where they're recommend-ing us to
go.
At least that's whatI'm going to recommend
that
we
do,
too," Cullen said.Cullen said that in the pastfew years, the FLA has becomemore powerful in its monitoringcapabilities and has gotten moreteeth to it"My understanding, too, fromthis organization
is,
say there hasbeen a violation at one of theplants, it's not a reflection of theFLA or any of the schools thatparticipate. But now we knowabout it, and the FLA digs intoit They find what the remedies
are,
and if they don't correct it,they notify the members on theirlist I think that's what we couldbenefit from/'
'If
XYZ company is one
of
our suppliers and they are notliving up to that code of con-duct, I want to know about it.They've come a long way in thelast couple of years (the FLA).
They're
starting to
get
into it with
a lot
of worldwide attention. Andthey really seem to be doing apretty good job."gl"Again, it's about human rights.Human dignity
is
the bottom line
here,"
Cullen said. "And if wedon't believe in what our mis-sion statement is, then we
have
a problem. But
we
don't"
So
students
can buy
a sweatshirtto show off Mercyhurst pride,being proud of their school andthe support of human rights.Check
out
 http://www.fairlabor. org/ for additional informationon the mission and work doneby the FLA.great deal of options at
their,
disposal
to
help students throughproblems, and students are
ac-
tively involved in the handlingof the issue. Zirlde cited the useof the Counseling Center andan increase in the Police pres-ence in the area as some of themany tools Res Life has at theirdisposal.
f
Beyond the obvious advisoriesagainst leaving doors open or
unlocked,
Zirkle
believes thateducation is the key to improvingcampus safety. Zirkle
also
advisesstudents to
"be
careful with in-formation you give out"However, new methods ofdealing with security are beingdiscussed regularly. Zirkle men-tioned the recent addition of aswipe card system to the fresh-men dorms and suggested thatthe same system may
be
installedat the apartments. Zirkle alsomentioned that entry codes wereone of the other ideas underconsideration."I think the school will con-tinue building on what they'redoing," said Zirkle. This does notmean that students can't expectto see something completelynew from Residence Life. Infact, a new program, introducedthis year, is now into its secondweek.The Progressive Passive Pro-gramming Project (P3 project)is a three-week long series ofprogramming designed by
RAs,
which differs from building tobuilding. "Its goal is to get theresidents the resources they needto deal with the winter
blues,"
said SarahAllen,one of the As-sistant Directors in
Res. life.
As the
P3
instructions read,]winter blues is ".
..that
blah feel-ing that happens to us
Whefl
wedon't
see
the sun for days
on
end,when the cold is just a bit colderthan we want it to be, when it'sJanuary and we know this is go-ing to last 3 more months." Theprogram builds over three weeks,centering on the buildings' bulle-tin board, and educates studentson methods to handle seasonaldepression.The Residence Life staffwas mixed during the develop-ment of the P3 program, whichenabled the RAs a chance tointeract with each other. Groupsof three RAs developed a threeweek
series
of programming, andapplied the program to their ownbuildings.
Themed
decorations,informa-tion on depression and winter
ac-
tivities are among the things thatcan be found on apartment bul-letin boards across campus andresidents can expect to see thisnew addition to Residence Life,
as well as
continued developmentof security evolve as winter andfuture months drag on.
'Hurst celebrates Martin Luther King Jr.
Continuedfr6m Page L
Students were excused fromclass and encouraged to partici-
pate
in as many of the
activities
as possible.During the breakfast, voicemajor Eric Marshall and fac-ulty member, Lisa Laymen, per-formed a collection of spiritualsongs.
x *
President of Diversity 101,
Arian
Keddell,
said she wanted
to
te
leet
he
dub's
artistic qualities,as well, as their cultural quali-
ties.
Members of the dance depart-ment also performed an "inspi-rational" dance. Keddell, whowas choreographer of the dance,gained her inspiration from the
song "May It
Be".
/
The Martin Luther
King
Jr.Center sponsors a week
called
King Holiday Week that occurredthis year from Jan.
10 -untir^anr
17.
One of the events includedin the
'Holiday
Week' was amarch offered to the public,which students and faculty
of
Mercyhurst participated in.In the future, Keddell saidDiversity 101 and MSG will beworking to better coordinate theactivities the city provides withthe
college's
and participate inmore events the Martin LutherKing Jr. Center offers.After the
breakfast,
manyheaded to Perry Square indown-town Erie to participate in themarch.Mercyhurst Student Govern-ment Association, Diversity
101
Club and the Mercyhurst SocialWork Club were among themarchers. part
series
presented by Diversity
"I
really thought
it
was ama2ing^JllU*-3^
<<
Mattershowso
fiafiy
 people braved the of Race" takes a look at racebitter cold and snow to celebrateone
man's
great triumph of sucha tough cultural struggle/
1
saidMaggie Wilkins, vice presidentof the social work club."Personally, I have a huge di-verse group of friends and if itwere not for Martin Luther KingI may not have been able to havethat same group of friends that Ihave," said
Aisha
Jasper, a mem-ber of the Diversity
101
club.
She
stressed that it is importantfor people to understand that itis not just an African Americanholiday, but also a holiday thatour country as a whole shouldcelebrate.The celebration continues onTuesday with the first of a two& the role it plays
in
Americandemocracy.Part 2 of the
scries
will beshown on Wednesday. Bothparts begin at 7 p.m. and
will
be shown in the Student UnionGreat Room.Mercyhurst Student Govern-ment presents
a
play
called,
"TheMeeting"onThursday;Jan. 20th.The play is about a fictitiousmeeting between Martin Luther
King
J
r.
and Malcolm X staged
in
the early
60's
in a Harlem apart-ment. The show begins at 8:30p.m. in Taylor
litde
Theatre and
is
an offering of the MSG Speak-ers Series. Admission is
free
andopen to the public
FREE TAN
on
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2/28/05
$30
off
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Month UNLIMITED
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