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Hearing Shofar: The Still Small Voice of the Ram's Horn - Vol. 3

Hearing Shofar: The Still Small Voice of the Ram's Horn - Vol. 3

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Published by MichaelChusid
Written by Michael Chusid, see www.HearingShofar.com for more information.
Written by Michael Chusid, see www.HearingShofar.com for more information.

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Published by: MichaelChusid on May 30, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/04/2014

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Hearing Shofar Volume 3 Page 1
 
© 2009, Michael T. Chusid
H
EARING
S
HOFAR 
:T
HE
S
TILL
S
MALL
V
OICE OF THE
AM
S
H
ORN
 
 Book Three – 
The People of the RamBy Michael T. Chusid
 
Hearing Shofar Volume 3 Page 2
 
© 2009, Michael T. Chusid
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FRONT MATERIAL
Title PageAbout the Author  NoticesAcknowledgementsFrontMaterial.htmForward – by Rabbi Dr. Zalman M. Schachter-Shalomi
BOOK ONE – THE CALL OF THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
Click here.
 BOOK TWO – FOR THE SHOFAR BLOWER 
 
Click here.
BOOK THREE – THE PEOPLE OF THE RAM
.
 3-1
 
Shepherd Nation: 
Shofar is a legacy of our ancestor’s vocation.
 3-2
 
The Still Small Voice: 
Shofar as a call to silence.
 3-3
 
Sometimes a Shofar is Just a Shofar: 
 Psychological perspectives.
 3-4
 
The Shaman’s Shofar: 
Tikkun olam and the healing of our souls and world.
 3-5
 
Beyond the Days of Awe: 
Shofar for other holidays and rituals.
 3-6
 
The Ram’s Horn of Passover: 
 A proposal for a shofar on a seder table.
 3-7
 
The Silent Shofar: 
 Including the deaf in shofar.
 3-8
 
Iconography and Iconolatry:
Thevisual symbolism of horns in Judaism
.3-9
 
More Teachings from the Ram: 
Grazing among the writings of the Sages.
 3-10
 
Shalshelet 
and Shofar: 
 A trope and the chain of tradition.
 3-11
 
After Jericho, Shevarim: 
Shofar insight from
The Book of Joshua.3-12
 
Would a Shofar by Any Other Name Smell So Sweet?: 
 Insights from etymology.
 3-13
 
Spirituality and “Spirality”: 
Shofar’s spiral shape as a map for spiritual growth.
 3-14
 
Blow it as it Grows: 
Can a side-blown horn be a shofar?
 3-15
 
Shofar, So Good: 
Teachings too good to ignore.
 
Appendices:
 Scriptural References to Shofar  Bibliography
This copyrighted book is offered as a free download as a public service to support understanding and appreciation of shofar. If you receive value from this work, please consider making a tax-deductibledonation to support Shofar Corps. Visit 
www.HearingShofar.comor
 click here to donate.
 © 2009 by Michael T. Chusid
 
Cover Image: Akedah, from mosaic at Bet Alpha Synagogue, 6
th
Century,www.jhom.com/calendar/tishrei/popup_art2.htm.
 RETURN TO TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
Hearing Shofar Volume 3 Page 3
 
© 2009, Michael T. Chusid
Chapter 3-1 – Shepherd Nation
 
“Shofar is part of the Jewish Operating System, the RAM that carries our collective memory.”
1
 It is likely that Jews have blown and responded to shofar for as long as there has been aHebrew tribe. The ram’s horn was an established technology among the sheep herdingcultures of the ancient Semitic world. “The earliest portrayals of such horns in the Near East date to the… eighteen century B.C.”
2
, and their use is undoubtedly much older thanthe existing archeological record.The pastoral and nomadic children of Israel remained in an “Ovine Age” even after themore advanced civilizations around them had entered the Bronze Age. Sheep providedmeat and milk for sustenance, wool for clothing and shelter, plus born and horn tofashion into implements and utensils; no part of the animal was wasted.
This image, carved 20,000+ years ago in the wall of a cave in the Dordogne Valley, France, is known asThe Venus of Laussel. She is also the archetype of Eve, whose Hebrew name, Chava, means breath. Thehorn she is holding is thought to be associated with fecundity, and its crescent moon shape relates to awoman’s monthly cycle of fertility.
1
Rabbi Zalman Schacter-Shalomi, speaking at Makom Ohr Shalom High Holy Day services. In this pun oncontemporary technology, “RAM” is an acronym for “random access memory, a part of a computer’s“operating system.”
2
Braum, page 301.

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