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Lord Acton, History of Freedom

Lord Acton, History of Freedom

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Published by Enricone
This book contains the first two tomes of Lord Acton's planned History of Freedom. The rest is a collection of essays extracted from reviews.
The book was formatted for double-side A5 printing. Extra space is allowed for the binding, in case one wants to print it. However, the pdf, once downloaded, can be browsed via an interactive table of contents.
This book contains the first two tomes of Lord Acton's planned History of Freedom. The rest is a collection of essays extracted from reviews.
The book was formatted for double-side A5 printing. Extra space is allowed for the binding, in case one wants to print it. However, the pdf, once downloaded, can be browsed via an interactive table of contents.

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Published by: Enricone on May 30, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/12/2013

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 JOHN EMERICH ED WARD DALBERGLORD ACTON
THE HISTORY OFFREEDOM
 AND OTHER ESSAYS
This material is put online to further the educational goalsof Liberty Fund, Inc. This material may be used freely foreducational and academic purposes. It may not be used inany way for profit.The typeface used for this book is New Baskerville.
 
INTRODUCTION
The two volumes here published contain but a small selection fromthe numerous writings of Acton on a variety of topics, which are to befound scattered through many periodicals of the last half-century. Theresult here displayed is therefore not complete. A further selection of nearly equal quantity might be made, and still much that is valuable in Acton’s work would remain buried. Here, for instance, we have extract-ed nothing from the
Chronicle;
and Acton’s gifts as a leader-writerremain without illustration. Yet they were remarkable. Rarely did heshow to better advantage than in the articles and reviews he wrote inthat short-lived rival of the
Saturday Review.
From the two bound vol-umes of that single weekly, there might be made a selection which would be of high interest to all who cared to learn what was passing inthe minds of the most acute and enlightened members of the RomanCommunion at one of the most critical epochs in the history of thepapacy. But what could never be reproduced is the general impressionof Acton’s many contributions to the
 Rambler,
the
 Home and Foreign,
andthe
 North British Review.
Perhaps none of his longer and more ceremoni-ous writings can give to the reader so vivid a sense at once of the rangeof Acton’s erudition and the strength of his critical faculty as does theperusal of these short notices. Any one who wished to understand thepersonality of Acton could not do better than take the published Bibli-ography and read a few of the articles on “contemporary literature”furnished by him to the three Reviews. In no other way could the readerso clearly realise the complexity of his mind or the vast number of subjects which he could touch with the hand of a master. In a singlenumber there are twenty-eight such notices. His writing before he wasthirty years of age shows an intimate and detailed knowledge of docu-ments and authorities which with most students is the “hard won andhardly won” achievement of a lifetime of labour. He always writes as thestudent, never as the
littérateur.
Even the memorable phrases which givepoint to his briefest articles are judicial, not journalistic. Yet he treats of matters which range from the dawn of history through the ancientempires down to subjects so essentially modern as the vast literature of revolutionary France or the leaders of the romantic movement which

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