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The Future of Government - Lessons Learned from around the World

The Future of Government - Lessons Learned from around the World

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The report The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World highlights best governance practices. The report is authored by the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government which includes 15 innovative experts and leading practitioners from some of the most advanced governments and international organizations.

The report builds the effective sharing of best (and worst) governance practices so as to speed innovation globally. It provides a comprehensive analysis of how the strategies, structures and practices of governments must change in the coming years to be FAST. Several recommendations are highlighted for governments to be more responsive to rapidly changing conditions and citizens’ expectations, as well as to build capacity to operate effectively in complex, interdependent networks of organizations and systems across the public, private and non-profit sectors.

The authors furthermore challenge governments to integrate two new kinds of metrics to measure government performance designed to accelerate the required transformation of government. The first measures holistic government performance along the four axes defined earlier as FAST. The second set of measures focus on measuring the value of transformation to citizens so as to allow governments to measure and benchmark improvements in “public value” from the point of view of citizens.

The report also explores the powerful but, in some cases, controversial concepts of open government and open data, giving examples of how governments can use the power of the Internet, including social media, to transform governance, empower citizens and rebuild the social contract between political leaders and citizens. It also looks at how to find the proper balance between open government and risk management.

Regardless of reform, revitalization and a technological revolution, the reality is that in many developing countries, at least in the foreseeable future, government alone will be unable to develop sufficient capacity to offer basic services to citizens. Yet the experience of the past decades vividly demonstrates that market forces alone will not produce enough public value either.

A range of public-private partnerships and other multi-sectoral arrangements have opened possibilities for value creation and greater efficiency. In this context, the report highlights the potential of social enterprise, an important way to leverage the innovative potential of entrepreneurship for social and economic development – particularly in settings where neither the government nor the market is likely to produce value using traditional means.
The report The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World highlights best governance practices. The report is authored by the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government which includes 15 innovative experts and leading practitioners from some of the most advanced governments and international organizations.

The report builds the effective sharing of best (and worst) governance practices so as to speed innovation globally. It provides a comprehensive analysis of how the strategies, structures and practices of governments must change in the coming years to be FAST. Several recommendations are highlighted for governments to be more responsive to rapidly changing conditions and citizens’ expectations, as well as to build capacity to operate effectively in complex, interdependent networks of organizations and systems across the public, private and non-profit sectors.

The authors furthermore challenge governments to integrate two new kinds of metrics to measure government performance designed to accelerate the required transformation of government. The first measures holistic government performance along the four axes defined earlier as FAST. The second set of measures focus on measuring the value of transformation to citizens so as to allow governments to measure and benchmark improvements in “public value” from the point of view of citizens.

The report also explores the powerful but, in some cases, controversial concepts of open government and open data, giving examples of how governments can use the power of the Internet, including social media, to transform governance, empower citizens and rebuild the social contract between political leaders and citizens. It also looks at how to find the proper balance between open government and risk management.

Regardless of reform, revitalization and a technological revolution, the reality is that in many developing countries, at least in the foreseeable future, government alone will be unable to develop sufficient capacity to offer basic services to citizens. Yet the experience of the past decades vividly demonstrates that market forces alone will not produce enough public value either.

A range of public-private partnerships and other multi-sectoral arrangements have opened possibilities for value creation and greater efficiency. In this context, the report highlights the potential of social enterprise, an important way to leverage the innovative potential of entrepreneurship for social and economic development – particularly in settings where neither the government nor the market is likely to produce value using traditional means.

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Published by: World Economic Forum on Jun 07, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/04/2013

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i
The Future of Government
Lessons Learned from around the World
Global Agenda Council onthe Future of Government
 
ii
Contents
ForewordMembers of the Global Agenda Council on the Future of GovernmentIntroduction and RecommendationsFAST Government (Flatter, Agile, Streamlined, Tech-enabled)Open Government and Open DataThe Civil Service in the 21st CenturyNew Government Requires New Measurements: Metrics of Government TransformationBenchmarking Public Value from the Perspective of CitizensSocial Enterprise: The Power of Private Sector Innovation for DevelopmentCybersecurity for Open GovernmentFuture Government ArchitectureCountry and Regional Cases: Best Practices and Lessons Learned
Citizen Engagement in the OECD
Singapore: E-Government Strategy
United Arab Emirates: An Evolving Holistic Approach to Government Modernization
United States: Open Government and Beyond
Lessons from the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Telecommunications andInformation Working Group
Why Is Super-fast Broadband so Important? Lessons from the United Kingdom andElsewhere
The views expressed herein represent a collation of viewpoints emerging from a series of discussions among the 
Members of the Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government.
Although the observations and proposals in this document enjoy support, they do not necessarily reflect the individual institutional viewpoints of any of the companies or institutions that took part, or of the World Economic Forum.
 
iii
Foreword
Governments around the world are faced with new demands, new expectations and a fast-growing array of new technologies and tools. A current example is the Middle East, where ayouth revolution built on the global technology revolution is demanding immediate reform. Thechallenges faced by governments increasingly span national borders and require resourcesand expertise to be mobilized on a scale that far exceeds those of governments.
To be efficient and effective in today’s complex, interlinked and fast
-changing environment,governments need to redesign their structures and processes to capitalize on a new set ofactors and tools.In this context, the Forum is pleased to present
The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World,
a report elaborated by the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda
Council on the Future of Government. The Council consists of 15 of the most innovativeexperts and leading practitioners from some of the most advanced governments andinternational organizations.The report provides a summary of the discussions that have taken place within the frameworkof Forum activities on how the strategies, structures and practices of governments mustchange in the coming years, and how new networks and technologies can be leveraged totransform government capacity. It includes a series of policy briefs, which distils some of themost current and vital information for government modernization available, and concludeswith case studies from around the world.Governments of the future will need to adapt and continuously evolve to create value. Theyneed to stay releva
nt by being responsive to rapidly changing conditions and citizens’
expectations, and build capacity to operate effectively in complex, interdependent networks oforganizations and systems across the public, private and non-profit sectors to co-producepublic value. As recommended in this report, what is needed today is flatter, agile,streamlined and tech-enabled (FAST) government.
In most countries, the civil service systems of today’s governments require considerable
modernization. The report suggests a number of measures to align civil service systems tothe requirements of FAST governments. Furthermore, governments in the 21st century will bemarked in many countries by reductions in the size of the civil service.The report emphasizes the importance of carefully planned workforce reductions coupled withthe significant organizational, technological and workforce advances inherent in FASTgovernments to build slim and streamlined organizations that can thrive in the new worldorder. Adaptive governments that share labour, services and resources through networkedapproaches and Gov 2.0 strategies can remain slim while delivering on their mission ineffective and innovative ways.The report also explores the powerful but, in some cases, controversial concepts of opengovernment
 
and open data, giving examples of how governments are using the power of theInternet and the Web, including social media, to transform governance, empower citizens andrebuild the social contract between political leaders and citizens.The report shares experience on citizen engagement tools designed to incorporate theperspectives and ideas of citizens in decision-making and reflects on how networkedrelationships can be built between the public and private sectors to solve challengingproblems that cannot be addressed by either sector working alone.Open government represents an emergent movement worldwide, although nationalgovernments will continue to differ with respect to the definition and implementation of theseideas. Clearly, sharing best practices and lessons that work as experience accumulates willbe crucial.

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rkumar_624208 added this note
I wish if India could be included in this study .India is a special case where governance system is failure due to bad political system which is eclipsed by corruption, slef interest ,short term personal gains , lack of accountability on bureacracy and suffering attitude of public who prefers to be silent rather than oppose .People suffer and struggle to live .High taxes and no care for public
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