Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Hallucinogens and Religion: Historical to Scientific Perspectives - R.R. Griffiths and H. de Wit

Hallucinogens and Religion: Historical to Scientific Perspectives - R.R. Griffiths and H. de Wit

Ratings: (0)|Views: 254 |Likes:
Published by Samir Al-Hamed
The Council on Spiritual Practices is a collaboration among spiritual guides, experts in the behavioral and biomedical sciences, and scholars of religion, dedicated to making direct experience of the sacred more available to more people. There is evidence that such encounters can have profound benefits for those who experience them, for their neighbors, and for the world.

CSP has a twofold mission: to identify and develop approaches to primary religious experience that can be used safely and effectively, and to help individuals and spiritual communities bring the insights, grace, and joy that arise from direct perception of the divine into their daily lives.

The Council on Spiritual Practices has no doctrine or liturgy of its own.

http://csp.org/index.html
The Council on Spiritual Practices is a collaboration among spiritual guides, experts in the behavioral and biomedical sciences, and scholars of religion, dedicated to making direct experience of the sacred more available to more people. There is evidence that such encounters can have profound benefits for those who experience them, for their neighbors, and for the world.

CSP has a twofold mission: to identify and develop approaches to primary religious experience that can be used safely and effectively, and to help individuals and spiritual communities bring the insights, grace, and joy that arise from direct perception of the divine into their daily lives.

The Council on Spiritual Practices has no doctrine or liturgy of its own.

http://csp.org/index.html

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Samir Al-Hamed on Jun 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/09/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Hallucinogens and Religion: Historical to Scientific Perspectives
R.R. Griffiths and H. de Wit, Chairpersons
Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the College onProblems of Drug Dependence
NIDA Research Monograph 182
Editor: Louis S. Harris, Ph.D. (Virginia Commonwealth University)
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of HealthNational Institute on Drug Abuse6001 Executive BoulevardBethesda, MD 20892
SYMPOSIUM XVIIIHALLUCINOGENS AND RELIGION: HISTORICAL TO SCIENTIFICPERSPECTIVES
R.R. Griffiths and H. deWit, Chairpersons
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MDUniversity of Chicago, Chicago, ILSymposium Program
 
 R.R. Griffiths (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine) andH. de Wit (University of Chicago)
 
C.R. Schuster (Wayne State University School of Medicine)
 
M. Dobkin de Rios (University of California, Irvine)
 
R. Jesse (Council on Spiritual Practices)
 
 
 
R.W. Hood (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)
 H.D. Kleber (Columbia University College of Physicians andSurgeons)
 
 
In the United States, hallucinogens are classified as Schedule Isubstances under the Controlled Substances Act because they areconsidered to have high abuse liability and to be of no therapeuticvalue. The Schedule I classification gives rise to the commonassumption that the hallucinogens have no value of 
any 
type, or nonet value relative to their risks. Yet psychoactive plants havinghallucinogenic effects have been valued for thousands of years inmany cultures, in structured contexts, for their ability to facilitatespiritual (i.e., mystical/transcendent) experiences (Schultes and
 
Hofmann 1992). The phenomenology of such mystical experiences hasbeen well-described and, as discussed below by Dr. Hood, can bereliably measured. Many scholars of religion believe that "naturally-occurring" mystical experiences, often occasioned by prayer, fasting,solitude or other austerities, have provided the bedrockphenomenological foundation for most of the world's religions (Smith2000). That is, the founders of many religions had profound mysticalexperiences on which they based their teachings.Of relevance to this symposium is the observation/hypothesis that,under appropriate conditions, hallucinogens can occasion profoundmystical experiences that are indistinguishable in description andimpact from the "naturally-occurring" mystical experiences. Thestriking similarity between the drug-occasioned and austerity-occasioned mystical states suggests the intriguing possibility that thetwo may be mediated by common biological mechanisms. In fact, thelast several years have witnessed increasing interest in theneurobiology of mystical experiences (Austin 1999; Newberg
et al 
.2001). A basic premise of this growing field of "neurotheology" is thatthe compelling commonalties among mystical experiences reportedacross time and across different cultures and faiths suggest a commonneurobiology reflecting the structures and function of the human brain.As discussed in this symposium on hallucinogens and religion, use of these drugs in natural settings has been studied from the perspectiveof anthropologists and historians. The preclinical and clinical behavioralpharmacology of these drugs have also been studied in laboratorycontexts quite different from the religious contexts in which thesedrugs are known to be used. However, a vast gap exists between ourknowledge of these drugs obtained using the descriptive methods of anthropology and the knowledge obtained using modern clinicalpharmacology methods. The gap is even larger than it would beotherwise because, largely in reaction to the excesses of the 1960s"psychedelic movement," there has been virtually no human researchwith hallucinogens for the last thirty years.The papers in this symposium discuss the use of hallucinogens inspiritual practices from several different perspectives. Dr. CharlesSchuster, a behavioral pharmacologist, discusses the neurochemistryand preclinical and clinical pharmacology of hallucinogens, and makesthe point that the classic seretonergically-mediated hallucinogens suchas LSD, mescaline and psilocybin do not show classic abuse liability asevidenced by self-administration in animals and euphoria in humans.Dr. Marlene de Rios, a medical anthropologist with particular expertise

Activity (5)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
JonoRowland liked this
windua liked this
banarisali liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->