Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
20Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Recipes From the Butcher's Guide to Well-Raised Meat

Recipes From the Butcher's Guide to Well-Raised Meat

Ratings:

5.0

(1)
|Views: 1,958 |Likes:
Published by The Recipe Club
Recipes in this excerpt include:
Lamb Meatballs
Flanken Steak
How to Cook the Perfect Steak

There is a food revolution sweeping the nation, changing the way Americans think and eat, and meat is at the heart of it. The butcher has reemerged in American culture as an essential guide in avoiding the evils of industrial meat—which not only tastes bad, but is also bad for one’s health and for the environment. Joshua and Jessica Applestone, a former vegan and vegetarian, are trailblazers in this arena. They run Fleisher’s, an old-school butcher shop with a modern-day mission—sourcing and selling only grass-fed and organic meat. The Applestones’ return to the nearly lost tradition of the buying and nose-to-tail carving of whole animals—all humanely raised close to their shop in New York’s Hudson Valley—has helped to make them rising stars in the food world.

The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat is a compendium of their firsthand knowledge. This unique book—a guide, memoir, manifesto, and reference in one—shares everything one needs to know about well-raised meat, including why pastured meats are so much better than conventional ones and how to perfectly butcher and cook them at home. Readers will learn which cut of steak to look for as an alternative to the popular hanger (of which each steer has only one), how to host a driveway pig roast, and even how to break down an entire lamb (or just butterfly the shoulder)—all with accompanying step-by-step photographs. Differences among breeds and ideal cooking methods for various cuts and offal are covered, and the Applestones’ decoding of misleading industry terminology and practices will help consumers make smarter, healthier purchases that can also help change what’s wrong with meat in America today.

Complete with color and black-and-white photographs, illustrations, and more than a dozen recipes, The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat is the definitive guide to eating great meat—responsibly.

To read more about The Butcher's Guide to Well-Raised Meat please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.
Recipes in this excerpt include:
Lamb Meatballs
Flanken Steak
How to Cook the Perfect Steak

There is a food revolution sweeping the nation, changing the way Americans think and eat, and meat is at the heart of it. The butcher has reemerged in American culture as an essential guide in avoiding the evils of industrial meat—which not only tastes bad, but is also bad for one’s health and for the environment. Joshua and Jessica Applestone, a former vegan and vegetarian, are trailblazers in this arena. They run Fleisher’s, an old-school butcher shop with a modern-day mission—sourcing and selling only grass-fed and organic meat. The Applestones’ return to the nearly lost tradition of the buying and nose-to-tail carving of whole animals—all humanely raised close to their shop in New York’s Hudson Valley—has helped to make them rising stars in the food world.

The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat is a compendium of their firsthand knowledge. This unique book—a guide, memoir, manifesto, and reference in one—shares everything one needs to know about well-raised meat, including why pastured meats are so much better than conventional ones and how to perfectly butcher and cook them at home. Readers will learn which cut of steak to look for as an alternative to the popular hanger (of which each steer has only one), how to host a driveway pig roast, and even how to break down an entire lamb (or just butterfly the shoulder)—all with accompanying step-by-step photographs. Differences among breeds and ideal cooking methods for various cuts and offal are covered, and the Applestones’ decoding of misleading industry terminology and practices will help consumers make smarter, healthier purchases that can also help change what’s wrong with meat in America today.

Complete with color and black-and-white photographs, illustrations, and more than a dozen recipes, The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat is the definitive guide to eating great meat—responsibly.

To read more about The Butcher's Guide to Well-Raised Meat please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.

More info:

Categories:Types, Recipes/Menus
Publish date: Jun 7, 2011
Added to Scribd: Jun 10, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Unless you pay close attention, grilling is perhaps the quickest way to ruin pasturedbeef. It is always leaner than its conventional cousins, requiring a delicate balanceof heat and timing, and a lot less latitude as far as cooking times go. You can’tthrow it on the grill and walk away. Grilling may be sexy, but we beg, we plead, wecajole customers to follow our instructions: pan-sear and nish it in the oven. Ourfavorite steak is dry-aged top sirloin at least 1½ inches thick. With a thinner steak,don’t transfer to the oven.
v
Preheat the oven to 300°F.
v
Bring to room temperature, then salt each side of the steak and let it sit for 5 to10 minutes before cooking.
v
Heat an ovenproof pan (French steel or cast iron is preferred) over high heat until itstarts to smoke (oil is not necessary, but add a tablespoon of organic canola oil ifyou like).
v
Sear the steak in the hot pan for 2 minutes per side. (Never use a fork to turn thesteak; use your ngers or tongs.)
v
Put a splash of olive oil, a pat of butter, a dollop of bone marrow, or a mixture ontop of the steak.
v
Transfer the pan to the oven.
v
Cook for 4 to 8 minutes to desired doneness (it depends on the steak, so go byinternal temperature, not time—we recommend 120°F for a perfect medium-rare).
v
Take the pan out of the oven, place the steak on a cutting board, and let it rest for5 minutes.
v
Slice and serve.
Cooking the PerfeCt Steak

Activity (20)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Tony Tavares liked this
Jesse Davis liked this
ParisTiembi liked this
Ramón Baró liked this
Claudia Foedde liked this
Scribd added this note
Important recipe for any meat lover: Cooking the Perfect Steak.
Scribd added this note
Important recipe for any meat lover: Cooking the Perfect Steak.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download