Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Management Intelligences Overview

Management Intelligences Overview

Ratings: (0)|Views: 25|Likes:
Published by Chris Maund
section the Author argues that knowledge (described in Section 1.1) whether gained through practical or academic experience is useless to modern managers unless you have the management intelligences to acquire relevant knowledge, recall and utilise that knowledge coupled with the desire to become a more rounded modern manager through continuous learning.
section the Author argues that knowledge (described in Section 1.1) whether gained through practical or academic experience is useless to modern managers unless you have the management intelligences to acquire relevant knowledge, recall and utilise that knowledge coupled with the desire to become a more rounded modern manager through continuous learning.

More info:

Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: Chris Maund on Jun 11, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/15/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 
Page 1
 
Extensive practitioner knowledge is more useful to modernmanagers than extensive academic knowledge
 
1
 
Introduction
In the following section the Author argues that knowledge (described in Section1.1) whether gained through practical or academic experience is useless to modernmanagers unless you have the management intelligences to acquire relevantknowledge, recall and utilise that knowledge coupled with the desire to become amore rounded modern manager through continuous learning.
1.1
 
Knowledge
Drucker (1993, p. 42)
1
 
defined management as “
supplying knowledge to find out howexisting knowledge can best be applied to produce results is, in effect, what we meanby management 
, but what is knowledge?Knowledge is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary
2
as:1)
 
expertise, and skills acquired by a person through experience or education; thetheoretical or practical understanding of a subject;2)
 
what is known in a particular field or in total; facts and information; or3)
 
be absolutely certain or sure about something.Philosophical debates on the definition of Knowledge (or epistemology) in generalstart with Plato's formulation of knowledge as "justified true belief." There is howeverno single agreed definition of knowledge presently, nor any prospect of one, and thereremain numerous competing theories.
3
 
The term “
extensive knowledge
” is
unclear, the definition
of “
extensive
used here is
 far-reaching; comprehensive; thorough
4
. Malcolm Gladwellquotes neurologistDaniel Levitin to frame the time to gain extensive practitioner knowledge.
5
 
Ten thousand hours is equivalent to roughly three hours a day, or 20 hours aweek, of practice over 10
 years.“.
 This paper demonstrates the development of effective management learning using
 productive inquiry, Kolb’s experiential learning and Confucius principles of gaining
wisdom.So what is Management Intelligence?
1
2
3
 accessed 20th March 2011
4
5
th
March 2011
 
 
Page 2
 
2
 
Management Intelligence
Using Gardner’ 
s (1983)
theory of multiple intelligences it is insufficient to use IQ(Intelligence Quotient) to define management intelligence; other intelligences and thedrive to continuously improve are needed. As part of B830 TMA03
the Author developed the management intelligence model(Figure 1)identifying psychologicalintelligences - Spiritual, Philosophical, Social and Emotional intelligences.
Figure 1.
 
Management Intelligences
To ensure that a manager does not become static in his/her environment a drive for
learning is paramount. This learning is 1) to address gaps in the manager’s
competences or capabilities and 2) to stay current with the state of affairs in the
manager’s particular industry and skill set. The following section argues the case for a
continuum of management learning to continually develop the skills to be a successfulmodern manager.
2.1
 
Management Learning
A manager comes with a priori knowledge, h
owever, there are points in a manager’s
career where something different has to be done to transcend to the next management[intelligence] level.In order for this to take place a step change in learning needs to happen,Figure: 1shows how these step changes have taken place over time for the Author. Developingmanagement intelligences is a career long embarkation. Whilst the concentric circlesimply an even learning
in the intelligence quadrants, in reality this couldn’t be further from the truth, for example the Author’s IQ of 135 has remained fairly static whilst
the other IQs have developed with practical/academic learning.
7
Phillips-Maund, C OU B830 TMA03 2010
 
 
Page 3
 
Figure: 1.
 
Authors Map for Developing Management Intelligence
Effective learning is attained through tools such as John Dewey’s productive inquiry
8
,experiential leaning (as per Kolb's model) and Confucius learning principles:
2.1.1
 
Productive Inquiry
Productive inquiry
9
sessions are conducted periodically (monthly) with colleagues,peers and leaders; the key features of productive inquiry are:
 
Addresses the haphazard nature of reflective practice
 
Deliberate, sustained and well thought through inquiry process into whatactions will improve our work performance
 
What methods of inquiry will help us gather high quality information whilstavoiding the
 Meno
paradox
10
(asking questions where the answers are alreadyknown).
 
Use of productive inquiry to gain a better understanding of our own sensedatum/sense perception
11
 
2.1.2
 
Experiential Learning
The Kolb learning cycle
12
combines theory and active experimentation to traverse the
later levels of Kegan’s model of the evolving self 
13
.
8
Ramsey, C (2008)
B204 Developing Productive Inquiry 
Open University Milton Keynes
9
Ramsey, C (2008)
B204 Developing Productive Inquiry 
Open University Milton Keynes
10
Rosen S (2000)
The Philosophers Handbook 
Random House New York
11
Rosen S (2000)
The Philosophers Handbook 
Random House New York
12
Holti et al, 2009
Issues and Approaches: Integrating Practice, Learning and Theory 
Open University,Milton Keynes
13
Kegan, Guest Lecture 5, pg 17, 2010 Open University

Activity (5)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Chris Maund liked this
Chris Maund liked this
Chris Maund liked this
Chris Maund liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->