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Table Of Contents

Conserving Natural Rights
Conserving Virtue
Conserving Excellence
Conserving Self-Government
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
BOYD AND JILL SMITH TASK FORCE ON VIRTUES OF A FREE SOCIETY
INDEX
P. 1
Conserving Liberty by Mark Blitz

Conserving Liberty by Mark Blitz

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Published by Hoover Institution
Originating in Hoover Institution discussions held under the auspices of the Boyd and Jill Smith Task Force on Virtues of a Free Society, Conserving Liberty defends the principles of American conservatism, clarifying many of the narrow or mistaken views that have arisen from both its friends and its foes. Author Mark Blitz asserts that individual liberty is the most powerful, reliable, and true standpoint from which to clarify and secure conservatism—but that individual freedom alone cannot produce happiness. He shows that, to fully grasp conservatism's merits, we must we also understand the substance of responsibility, toleration and other virtues, traditional institutions, individual excellence, and self-government.

Blitz first sketches the elements of conservatism that appeal to individuals, reminding us that to consider ourselves first of all as free individuals and not in group, class, racial, or gender terms is the heart of American conservatism's strength. He then shows that we need certain virtues to secure our rights and use them successfully—responsibility being the chief among these virtues. The author also explains how institutional authority works, why it is necessary, and where it supports the intellectually and morally excellent. He clarifies how natural rights and their associated virtues can be a base from which to secure and preserve necessary institutions.

Mark Blitz is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Political Philosophy at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California.
Originating in Hoover Institution discussions held under the auspices of the Boyd and Jill Smith Task Force on Virtues of a Free Society, Conserving Liberty defends the principles of American conservatism, clarifying many of the narrow or mistaken views that have arisen from both its friends and its foes. Author Mark Blitz asserts that individual liberty is the most powerful, reliable, and true standpoint from which to clarify and secure conservatism—but that individual freedom alone cannot produce happiness. He shows that, to fully grasp conservatism's merits, we must we also understand the substance of responsibility, toleration and other virtues, traditional institutions, individual excellence, and self-government.

Blitz first sketches the elements of conservatism that appeal to individuals, reminding us that to consider ourselves first of all as free individuals and not in group, class, racial, or gender terms is the heart of American conservatism's strength. He then shows that we need certain virtues to secure our rights and use them successfully—responsibility being the chief among these virtues. The author also explains how institutional authority works, why it is necessary, and where it supports the intellectually and morally excellent. He clarifies how natural rights and their associated virtues can be a base from which to secure and preserve necessary institutions.

Mark Blitz is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Political Philosophy at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California.

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Publish date: Jul 1, 2011
Added to Scribd: Jun 15, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780817914240
List Price: $14.95

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09/17/2014

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9780817914240

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Hoover Institution added this note
"The book explains & brilliantly defends full-blooded conservatism —conservatism that is robust in its faith in limited government, the rule of law, the market economy, traditional moral virtues, flourishing institutions of civil society, a strong national defense, & the right of people to govern themselves by the principles & institutions of constitutional democracy" -http://bit.ly/cH3t4O.
Hoover Institution added this note
Mark Blitz will discuss the 2012 presidential race and his Hoover Press book, Conserving Liberty, on WNRR-AM Radio's Powers to the People (Augusta, GA) tomorrow at 2pm PT / 5pm ET live. Listen online or to the podcast at www.wnrr1380.com.
Hoover Institution added this note
Mark Blitz will discuss the 2012 presidential race and his Hoover Press book, “Conserving Liberty”, on KOGO-AM San Diego Radio's Top Story with Chris Reed tonight at 7pm PT/10pm ET live. Listen online or to the podcast at www.am600kogo.com.
Hoover Institution added this note
Mark Blitz discussed his book Conserving Liberty on American Conservative Nation Radio’s Breaking It Down with DT on Friday. Listen online or to the podcast here http://bit.ly/p6sQGe
Hoover Institution added this note
Read Mark Blitz’s piece “We Want Our Citizens Engaged, Not Enraged.” http://www.hoover.org/publications/de...
Hoover Institution added this note
Conserving Liberty, by Mark Blitz, clarifies & defends contemporary American conservatism. He explains the beliefs, practices, & institutions that play a crucial role in forming and sustaining liberty in America. He also emphasizes the importance of preserving the virtues that uphold American liberty & points out that “political health” is not automatic, but requires constant judgment and choice.
Hoover Institution added this note
“The chief guideline for legislation and action is to judge, prudently, their overall effects on securing equal liberty, advancing responsible character, and permitting intelligent individual choice. When government must act, moreover, it should not use means that subvert the ends it attempts to serve." —Chapter Four, pg. 81

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