Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Recycle Match Enterprise Platform Whitepaper Jk 04

Recycle Match Enterprise Platform Whitepaper Jk 04

Ratings: (0)|Views: 208|Likes:
Published by Sustainable Brands
In the process of starting and building RecycleMatch, the first online B2B marketplace for business recycling and zero waste, we have done our research. We have researched every aspect of waste, recycling and today’s business climate around the concept of sustainability. This white paper includes some basic concepts and solid research sources, all of which are intended to help business leaders
see the hidden opportunities tucked away in our dumpsters and landfills.
In the process of starting and building RecycleMatch, the first online B2B marketplace for business recycling and zero waste, we have done our research. We have researched every aspect of waste, recycling and today’s business climate around the concept of sustainability. This white paper includes some basic concepts and solid research sources, all of which are intended to help business leaders
see the hidden opportunities tucked away in our dumpsters and landfills.

More info:

Published by: Sustainable Brands on Jun 15, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/09/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Debunking Six Myths AboutThe Materials In Your Company’s Dumpster
By Brooke Farrell, co-founder and CMO RecycleMatch
In the process o starting and building RecycleMatch, the frst online B2B mar-ketplace or business recycling and zero waste, we have done our research. Wehave researched every aspect o waste, recycling and today’s business climatearound the concept o sustainability. This white paper includes some basic con-cepts and solid research sources, all o which are intended to help business lead-ers see the hidden opportunities tucked away in our dumpsters and landflls.
Myth #1: Waste is natural.
Wrong. Waste is not a concept that exists in nature. Theecosystem is closed loop, meaning that one organism’s wastebecomes another’s ood or energy source. Think about how thebugs decompose carcasses or dung and allen leaves ertilizethe soil. (I you want a good resource on this concept and itsapplication in other systems thinking, read Cradle to Cradle byWilliam McDonough).In today’s post-industrial business ecosystem, waste hasbecome such an accepted practice o doing business that weare not realizing the value o the resources that are leaving ourbusiness ecosystem. Stop to consider what happens to thewaste generated by your company.
Myth #2: Recycling is a residential issue.These numbers can’t be real!
Based on the latest EPA data, or every one pound o trash dis-carded rom the goods and products we use at home, there areover 60 pounds generated in the manuacture and commerce o those goods. That’s a simplifed and likely underestimated version,considering that our many o the goods Americans consume comerom supply chains overseas. But the acts are that business gener-ates a signifcant volume o waste materials.Companies in the US dispose o 7.6 billion tons o industrial wasteeach year. Industrial waste is made up o a wide variety o non-hazardous materials that result rom the production o goods andproducts. The total amount o MSW in the US each year is 251 million tons.O that MSW, business actually represents an estimated 45% o that fgure too.251 Million Tons MSW7.6 Billion Tons Industrial Waste
Source http://www.epa.gov/waste/nonhaz/index.htm
 
Myth #3: Corporations, profts, and theenvironment are at odds
Many people less engaged in sustainable business practicesare oten surprised to learn that corporations like Wal-Mart, GM,Nike, IBM and others have actually led the way in sustainablebusiness practices. And, not surprisingly, they are doing it orbottom line reasons.When we frst researched the idea o Recy-cleMatch, we discovered that IBM had madean amazing match, resulting in a net $3 Millionimprovement. Instead o paying $1.5 million to put materialsinto a landfll, they ound a way to sell those “waste” materialsor $1.5 million. That was an early signal that RecycleMatch hadound it’s market niche.Read more about IBM’s case study at http://zerowasteblog.recyclematch.com/ibm-pioneers-process-to-turn-waste-into-solar-energy Another signal o the dramatic changein the industry was Wal-Mart’s an-nouncement that the organization, its8,400 stores and 100,000+ suppliers were aiming to achievezero waste by 2025. Wal-Mart has the unique scale to see howsmall changes can make a big impact.For example, by switching to Fair Trade Certifed bananas inthe Sam’s Club stores only, they negated the need to purchaseand use 875,000 gallons o herbicides. By eliminating auto-matic printing o routine retail reports, they saved $20 millionin printing costs. Any time a supplier ound a way to reducepackaging, total cost / value improvements were seen in thepackaging costs as well as transportation costs and shel spaceoptimization. Multiply that times 100,000 suppliers in the supplychain and you’ll realize why they are committed to zero wasteby 2025. More at http://walmartstores.com/Sustainability/ Mike Robinson, GM vice president o Environment,Energy and Saety, highlights recycling as part o thestrong business case or sustainability eorts at GM.“GM has generated more than $2.5 billion in revenue since2007 through its various recycling activities” said Robinson. That’s on top o the value achieved when GM reuses and re-purposes materials within their own operations. GM announcedthis year that 52% o their world-wide acilities are landfll ree,and they aim to grow that fgure continuously. Learn more athttp://media.gm.com/content/media/us/en/news/news_detail.brand_gm.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2010/Dec/1213_landfllProbably the most transparent and interestingo the corporate leaders is Nike. Not only havethey established a consumer-take-back pro-gram to recycle shoes, turning them into sport-courts, but theyalso are very orthcoming with the business reasons or theirsustainability actions. Their executives publically explain that i they were to continue to meet earnings and growth predicatedon a business-as-usual industry standard model, they wouldliterally require more natural resources than the earth has withinour lietimes. Nike exec Lorie Vogle notes that the produc-tion o one t-shirt currently requires over 700 gallons o water. That’s the kind o business driven inormation that is drivingthem to design more sustainable materials to uel growth wellinto the uture. Read more at http://blogs.reuters.com/adam-pasick/2009/10/24/nike-the-albatross-and-sustainable-design/ 
Myth #4: Carbon trumps waste as anenvironmental issue
Whether your environmental ocus is on carbon, energy, wateror other natural resources, you should care about waste. Wasteis inextricably connected to all o these pressing environmentalconcerns. For example, aluminum is 100% recyclable withoutlosing any o its virgin characteristics. Recycling the materialrequires only 5% o the energy and 5% o the carbon needed toproduce new virgin aluminum rom bauxite. Reusing the existingresource negates the need or open cut mining to extract theore, a practice that causes lasting damage to land. Read moreat http://www.benefts-o-recycling.com/recyclealuminum.htmlNot all impact o waste is as easy to calculate or has thesame dramatic benefts as aluminum. A detailed EPA studyrom 2007 (http://www.epa.gov/wastes/nonhaz/municipal/ pubs/06benefts.pd) estimates that the 32% o MSW (mu-nicipal solid waste, the tiny slice in the chart above) recycledtoday saves an equivalent amount o C02 as taking 39.4 millioncars o the road. That’s about 15.5% o all the cars in the US.But that’s just the small percent o waste that is recycled romhouseholds, ofce lunch rooms and other non-manuacturingbusiness. It does not apply to the 7.6 billion in industrially gener-ated waste.We recognize that the MSW calculation wouldn’t apply uni-ormly to all materials generated by business and industrialsources. Some would have more impact while others wouldhave less impact. But i the average impact was the same,the impact resulting rom industrial waste in the US each yearwould be equivalent to 35.6 billion cars on the road, around 43times more cars than exist in the world today. More at http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automobile.Even i that calculation is only directionally helpul, it’s mind-blowing to consider the carbon impact hidden in our dump-sters. To get at more exact estimates or the impact associated withyour company’s waste or waste reduction eorts, there are anincreasing number consultants and experts available to workwith individual corporations and supply chains. RecycleMatchhas relationships with a number o these organizations andwould be glad to make introductions since this is not the kind o work we do as an online marketplace.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->