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Table Of Contents

EXPECTATIONS
A LINE IN THE SAND
THE STRIKE
AFTERMATH
FOR BETTER OR WORSE: A NEW PATCO
CONCLUSION
BIBLIOGRAPHY
END NOTES
INDEX
P. 1
P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN: AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY

P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN: AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY

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P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN: AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY - The Air Traffic Controllers' Strike of 1981 - documents those ominous days leading up to, including, andafter the fateful strike and consequent firing of over 11,000 federal employees by the President of the United States in August, 1981. Relying onprimary White House research materials available in the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library archives, the book concludes that both the strike and thedismissal were not only predictable, but inescapable scenarios, given the resolute and tenacious personalities of the leaders involved. It discussesin length, the compounding effects that the strike had on its members, society at large, and the White House. P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN explores the motivations behind the strikers’ controversial actions and the corresponding rationales of their opponents, whichincluded just about everybody else. It highlights the heightened emotions that fueled the union’s expectations before the strike and drove its ferventquest for redemption after the strike. The union’s inability to comprehend how the strike would be perceived ultimately doomed its efforts andcondemned it to a collision course with the Reagan Administration, the general public, and even its own membership . As a consequence, organized laborin the United States would never be the same.
P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN: AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY - The Air Traffic Controllers' Strike of 1981 - documents those ominous days leading up to, including, andafter the fateful strike and consequent firing of over 11,000 federal employees by the President of the United States in August, 1981. Relying onprimary White House research materials available in the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library archives, the book concludes that both the strike and thedismissal were not only predictable, but inescapable scenarios, given the resolute and tenacious personalities of the leaders involved. It discussesin length, the compounding effects that the strike had on its members, society at large, and the White House. P.A.T.C.O. AND REAGAN explores the motivations behind the strikers’ controversial actions and the corresponding rationales of their opponents, whichincluded just about everybody else. It highlights the heightened emotions that fueled the union’s expectations before the strike and drove its ferventquest for redemption after the strike. The union’s inability to comprehend how the strike would be perceived ultimately doomed its efforts andcondemned it to a collision course with the Reagan Administration, the general public, and even its own membership . As a consequence, organized laborin the United States would never be the same.

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Publish date: Apr 29, 2011
Added to Scribd: Jun 17, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781456718503
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