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P. 1
The Scroll by Grant R. Jeffrey and Alton L. Gansky (ch. 1 excerpt)

The Scroll by Grant R. Jeffrey and Alton L. Gansky (ch. 1 excerpt)

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Can an archaeological discovery change the course of human history?

Only one man knows the intricate ancient tunnels beneath Jerusalem. Can he overcome his doubts to make one last dig – a dig that could change the course of human history?
Can an archaeological discovery change the course of human history?

Only one man knows the intricate ancient tunnels beneath Jerusalem. Can he overcome his doubts to make one last dig – a dig that could change the course of human history?

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Published by: WaterBrook Multnomah on Jun 17, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/09/2014

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The ScrollPublished by WaterBrook Press
12265 Oracle Boulevard, Suite 200Colorado Springs, Colorado 80921Scripture quotations are taken rom the Holy Bible, New International Version®,NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The characters and events in this book are fctional, and any resemblance to actualpersons or events is coincidental.ISBN 978-0-307-72926-2ISBN 978-0-307-72927-9 (electronic)Copyright © 2011 by Grant R. Jerey and Alton L. Gansky Cover design by Mark FordCover images by Howard Kingsnorth|Stone, Imagesource, iStockphoto All rights reserved. No part o this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any ormor by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, orby any inormation storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing romthe publisher.Published in the United States by WaterBrook Multnomah, an imprint o the CrownPublishing Group, a division o Random House Inc., New York.
 WaterBrook 
and its deer colophon are registered trademarks o Random House Inc.Library o Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Jerey, Grant R.The scroll : a novel / Grant Jerey and Alton Gansky.—1st ed.p. cm.ISBN 978-0-307-72926-2—ISBN 978-0-307-72927-9 (ebk.)1. Archaeologists—Fiction. 2. Excavations (Archaeology)JerusalemFiction.3. Copper scroll—Fiction. I. Gansky, Alton. II. Title.PS3560.E436S37 2011813'.54—dc222011013966Printed in the United States o America2011—First Edition10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Excerpted from The Scroll by Grant R. Jeffrey and Alton L. Gansky. Copyright © 2011 by Grant R. Jeffrey and Alton L. Gansky. Excerpted by permission ofWaterBrook Press, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. Nopart of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission inwriting from the publisher.
 
P r o l o g u e
 Jerusalem, June 15, 2012 
D
avid Chambers raised his video camera and pointed it at a limestoneacing that had allen rom the north wall and settled at the base o the narrow tunnel. He had seen fteen such structural ailures so ar and wouldn’t be surprised to see more. He was viewing work done two millen-nia agowork that hadn’t been seen or twenty centuries. What surprisedhim was that there wasn’t more damage. He had been in tunnels that re-quired weeks o clearing.The light o the camera illuminated the larger stones that provided thestructural support or the tunnel. At frst glance they looked like the blockshe had seen at the mouth o the passageway, ten miles back. Abovegroundsurveys indicated the rough tunnel ran almost eleven miles. On even terrain,a man could make three miles an hour. Here, things went much slower.Chambers directed the camera in a slow arc, letting the lens take inevery detail. It was his frst pass through the tunnel, and he wanted a re-cord that he could study or years to come. Archaeology had a reputation or excitement and startling discovery.Most days it was just plain hard, dirty work—labor that involved equalamounts o mind-breaking scholarship and backbreaking physical work.Scholarship, perspiration, and luck were the triplets o his science.He turned o the camera and let the blackness envelop him. A secondlater his heart rate doubled, and he could eel his blood pressure rise. Thelast sensation, he fgured, was more imagination than act, but it was realto him.

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