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Timaeus - Plato

Timaeus - Plato

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Published by: lnietzsche on Jun 18, 2011
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Timaeus
Plato(Translator: Benjamin Jowett)
Published:
-400
Categorie(s):
Non-Fiction, Philosophy
Source:
http://en.wikisource.org
1
 
About Plato:
Plato (Greek: Plátōn, "wide, broad-shouldered") (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the second of the great trio of ancient Greeks –Socrates, Plato, originally named Aristocles, and Aris-totle– who between them laid the philosophical foundations of Westernculture. Plato was also a mathematician, writer of philosophical dia-logues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the western world. Plato is widely believed to have been a student of Socrates and to have been deeply influenced by histeacher's unjust death. Plato's brilliance as a writer and thinker can bewitnessed by reading his Socratic dialogues. Some of the dialogues, let-ters, and other works that are ascribed to him are considered spurious.Plato is thought to have lectured at the Academy, although the pedago-gical function of his dialogues, if any, is not known with certainty. Theyhave historically been used to teach philosophy, logic, rhetoric, mathem-atics, and other subjects about which he wrote. Source: Wikipedia
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Persons of the dialogue:
Socrates; Critias; Timaeus; Hermocrates
Socrates.
One, two, three; but where, my dear Timaeus, is the fourth of those who were yesterday my guests and are to be my entertainers to-day?
Timaeus.
He has been taken ill, Socrates; for he would not willinglyhave been absent from this gathering.
Soc.
Then, if he is not coming, you and the two others must supply hisplace.
Tim.
Certainly, and we will do all that we can; having been hand-somely entertained by you yesterday, those of us who remain should beonly too glad to return your hospitality.
Soc.
Do you remember what were the points of which I required youto speak?
Tim.
We remember some of them, and you will be here to remind usof anything which we have forgotten: or rather, if we are not troublingyou, will you briefly recapitulate the whole, and then the particulars will be more firmly fixed in our memories?
Soc.
To be sure I will: the chief theme of my yesterday's discourse wasthe State-how constituted and of what citizens composed it would seemlikely to be most perfect.
Tim.
Yes, Socrates; and what you said of it was very much to ourmind.
Soc.
Did we not begin by separating the husbandmen and the artisansfrom the class of defenders of the State?
Tim.
Yes.
Soc.
And when we had given to each one that single employment andparticular art which was suited to his nature, we spoke of those whowere intended to be our warriors, and said that they were to be guardi-ans of the city against attacks from within as well as from without, and
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