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The Pittston Dispatch 06-19-2011

The Pittston Dispatch 06-19-2011

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Published by The Times Leader
The Pittston Dispatch 06-19
The Pittston Dispatch 06-19

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Published by: The Times Leader on Jun 19, 2011
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WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.00Sunday, June19, 2011
Final day of classescomes for143-yearold St. Mary’s.
>> PAGE 3
Annual summertour today starts atSt. Cecilia’s, Exeter.
>> PAGE 6
School’s outfor good6th annualchurch tour 
COUPONSAVINGSINSIDEWORTH$311.44
PHOTO BY BILL TARUTIS
Celebrating
35
Years
 1 9 7 6
121 S. Main Street, Pittston
654-0067
 Northeast Fair 
 Wishing The
The Law Offices of 
Michael I. Butera
Continued Success as they Grow and Prosper Each Year
Providing Quality Legal Services To The People of Northeast PA 
 
       P       A       G       E
      2      S      U      N      D      A      Y      D      I      S      P      A      T      C      H
  ,      S      U      N      D      A      Y  ,      J      U      N      E      1      9  ,      2      0      1      1
        2        5        9        1        3        3
 
Call Karen Fiscus at 970-7291
Advertising deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M.
That’s my boy over there. He’s 24 and works at an ad agency in Boulder, Co. This ishis Father’s Day gift to me.
Being a man isn’t easy.There’s no step-by-step manualto teach someone.Sure, there are guidelines.The Bible’s certainly a good one to look to for advice. Butthere’s a whole lot of other stuff  packed in there that mightcloud the manly tutelage. And it’s certainly not the “Be a ManFor Dummies” we all need.Instead, we’re left to learnfrom the world around us, to pick up pieces of wisdom hereand there from wherever wecan.This is risky. Especially whenwe turn to things like the eve-ning news. More especiallywhen the headline story detailsthe less than personal photog-raphy exploits of a US Con-gressman. Or the tragic, moralfall of a golf legend. Or anA-list celebrity’s chaotic obses-sion with “winning.”It’s more like we’re surround-ed with limitless examples of how
not 
to be a man.But amidst the sex scandalsand steroids, we find a fewglimmers of hope. A handful of men doing everything they canto ensure that we, who are onour way to manhood, do it theright way. I just happen to belucky enough to have one suchman for a father.And on this Father’s Day, Ican think of no better way tothank him for every lesson he’sgiven me than to relay a few of them to you.Lesson One: Be a Tag Tuck-er. This one’s fairly straight-forward. A Tag Tucker is some-one who will assist a friend,family member, or even a com- plete stranger in tucking a shirttag neatly beneath the collar from which it rebelliously es-caped. Awkward, yes. But mostdefinitely appreciated.And a Tag Tucker does morethan tuck tags. He holds opendoors. He gives up his seat for ayoung mother on a crowded  bus. He minds his Ps and Qs.Always. He’s polite and friendlywith everyone he deals with,from the mailman to the CEO.He’s an ear when you want one,a shoulder when you need one,and a steward of positivity.If you’re looking to be a man,start first by being a Tag Tuck-er.Lesson Two: Eat the greenLifesavers. Many of you may be familiar with this concept.For those who aren’t and aresoon expecting to be fathers,you will be. You see, in somesort of cruel ploy, the Lifesaverscompany decided to stock eachroll with anywhere between twoand four green candies. No onelikes these. Least of all your kids. And it’s your job as agood dad to eat these so that junior can get his hands on thecherry one waiting on deck.Well, life is filled with greenLifesavers. And to be a man,you need to be willing to takethem without complaint, toendure a few hardships so oth-ers won’t have to. Sometimesit’s as simple as eating the nastycandy. Often times, it’s not. It’staking an extra shift at work togive a buddy a much-needed  break. It’s helping your kidswith algebra after a long day atthe office. It’s sitting throughyour niece’s dance recital. Iknow, that one sounds almostunbearable. But bear it. Be-cause you can’t truly be a manwithout being willing to sacri-fice.Lesson Three: Be a cheer-leader. No, you don’t have towear a skirt and shake pom- poms. Unless, of course, youchoose to. That’s your own business. But you do need to beenthusiastically supportive of the important people in your life: your wife, your girlfriend,your kids, your parents. Betheir biggest fan.The love and support youfunnel their way will help themmore than you know. Trust me.Lesson Four: Love too much.Where lessons One throughThree will all greatly help youon your journey toward man-hood, lesson four is the clinch-er. To be a man, a real man, youneed to be willing to give of yourself so fully that it hurts.To everyone.Tip your waitress a little toogenerously. Find the time tovolunteer to help those whoreally need it. Play a game of catch with your ten-year-old neighbor when he’s lookingglum. Shovel your mom’ssnow-covered sidewalk – evenif she lives ten miles away.Do all of these things with asmile. Love is infectious. Themore you give, the more it willspread.If when your time as mancomes to a close you can say, “Iloved almost too much,” thenyou’ve accomplished some-thing truly beautiful.These aren’t the only lessonsyou’ll need. They’re just a good start. I’ve had nearly 25 years to begin to learn these lessons.And I’m still learning them.Turns out, learning to be aman isn’t as easy as it sounds.Luckily, I have a good teacher.
Michael Ackerman
 mackerman@cpbgroup.com
How to be a man
School’s Out......................................................3Sitting Down with Miz.....................................4Unique Dad........................................................5Local Chatter....................................................8Matters of Faith...............................................10Editorial /Letters.............................................14Maria Heck........................................................15Nutrition............................................................15Peeking into the Past......................................17Gift to Irish Embassy.....................................32Town News......................................................40Sports..............................................................49Obituaries........................................................63Weddings.................................................Social1Birthdays................................................Social 3
         I         N         S          I         D         E
VOL. 65, NO.19
 
 S  UNDAYDI    S A C H
 , S  UNA , J  UN1    9  , 0 1   1   A G 
 3 
W
hen St. Mary’s As-sumption School onthe corner of ChurchandCarrollstreetsletoutclassesfor the last time on Thursday allthat was left were the memoriesand the history. And after a runof143 years, there are a lot both.Perhaps no one is intertwined in that history more than Do-rothyWilliams.Notonlywasher maternal grandfather FranBaumgartner on the committeethat built the school in1924, her  paternal grandparents John and Elizabeth Boos sold the land for the school to Rev. M. J. HobanBishop of the Scranton Diocesein1908.Though family lore holds thatBoos donated the land, the deed shows it was sold. In any case,the diocese got a deal becausethe lot was big enough for aschool and a convent.Williams graduated from St.Mary’s as did her five childrenandtheyareamongthe10grand-children,13 great-grandchildrenand four great-great grandchil-dren of Frank Baumgartner and John Boos to attend St. Mary’s.The four great-great grand-children, three sons and onedaughter of Mark and MichaelSkutack, were St. Mary’s stu-dents when the school closed onThursday.Williams, 72, was DorothyBoos when she grew up on Car-roll Street next door to the con-vent which sits behind thechurch on the land her grandfa-ther sold in1908.She said having a dozen or sonuns for neighbors was not a problem. “They were just likeregular neighbors,” she said.She moved away and lived inPhiladelphia, New York and West Wyoming, before moving back to the homestead when her father died 25 years ago.OnThursdayafterthestudentsleft, Williams went to the schoolto enquire about a plaque in theentranceway. The large marble plaque is engraved with thenames of the men who were onthe building committee, he
St.Mary'schurch,rectoryandschoolinaphotodatingtotheearly1900s.Anewbrickschoolwasbuiltin1924replacingthebuildingontheright.Thephotowassub-mittedby
Dorothy Williams, St. Mary’s share a past
After143 years, St. Mary’s Assumption School closes for good
By Jack Smiles 
 Associate Editor 
Thisplaqueliststhenamesofthoseontheoriginalbuildingcom-mitteeforSt.Mary'sAssumptionSchool.FrankBaumgartnerisDorothyBooswilliams'grandfather.
 PHOTOS BY JACK SMILES 
DorothyBooswilliamspointstothenameofhergrandfatheronaplaqueinsidethenowclosedSt.Mary'sAssumptionschool.
SeeST.MARY'S,Page9

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