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Analysis of the Smart Meter System

Analysis of the Smart Meter System

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Published by jwr47
Studying the Smart Meter Comments at the website EMF Safety Network various problems may be identified in the reports. Electromagnetic radiation by the transmitter system seems to be one of the minor in a series of problems. Bad wiring concepts, resonating antennas and spurious interferences may contribute to dangerous behavior at a number of equipment in the electric current circuits.

The use of a free, but overloaded frequency channel seems to cause interference and signal collisions. Additionally bad wiring and grounding seem to cause problems in circuits, which are to be controlled by RF-signals.

Obviously there is no standard program to check the smart meter-system after it has been installed in a house. The standard check should calibrate the meter with a defined load for correct measurement, wiring and transmission.

Maybe the meters and some equipment should be redesigned to improve the shielding for RF-impulses from the transmitter to sensitive peripheral devices and/or from radiating peripheral devices to the meters' circuitry.
Studying the Smart Meter Comments at the website EMF Safety Network various problems may be identified in the reports. Electromagnetic radiation by the transmitter system seems to be one of the minor in a series of problems. Bad wiring concepts, resonating antennas and spurious interferences may contribute to dangerous behavior at a number of equipment in the electric current circuits.

The use of a free, but overloaded frequency channel seems to cause interference and signal collisions. Additionally bad wiring and grounding seem to cause problems in circuits, which are to be controlled by RF-signals.

Obviously there is no standard program to check the smart meter-system after it has been installed in a house. The standard check should calibrate the meter with a defined load for correct measurement, wiring and transmission.

Maybe the meters and some equipment should be redesigned to improve the shielding for RF-impulses from the transmitter to sensitive peripheral devices and/or from radiating peripheral devices to the meters' circuitry.

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Published by: jwr47 on Jun 20, 2011
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11/25/2012

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Analysis of the Smart Meter System
J.W. Richter Studying the Smart Meter Comments
1
at the website
 EMF Safety Network 
various problemsmay be identified in the reports. Electromagnetic radiation by the transmitter system seemsto be one of the minor in a series of problems. Bad wiring concepts, resonating antennas andspurious interferences may contribute to dangerous behavior at a number of equipment inthe electric current circuits.The Smart Meters - system is explained inUnderstanding Radio Frequency (RF). The new systemwhich has been introduced 2006 uses a small 1-Watt transmitter and receiver system allowing two-way communication between the customer and the provider company, enabling the customer toreview their daily energy use.In January, 2011, the California Council on Science and Technology (CCST) released a preliminarystudy. On March 31, 2011 the final version of "Health Impacts of Radio Frequency Exposure from Smart Meters" was released by the CCST.
Smart Meters
Cell phones are typically held against your head when in use, while
 smart meters are outside your house, on the other side of the wall 
.
 However some reports indicate some of the meters are also to be mounted inside thebedrooms – quite
near to a sleeping person's head 
...
Operating within the 902928 MHz (megahertz) frequency band Smart Meters are transmitting
 about 45 seconds a day
2
. In its initial deployment the provider company will configure the systemsto transmit data from the meter to the access point once every four hours, for about 50 millisecondsat a time. In this initial use a typical smart meter would not transmit any RF signal at least 9698
  percent of the time. However smart meters have been designed as a part of a broader “mesh”network and may act as a relay among other smart meters and utility access points. As soon as thesmart grid is completed smart meters are expected to transmit much more than once every four hours, providing data in near realtime, which will result in a much higher duty cycle.
Smart meters are designed to transmit data to a utility access point that is usually 25 feet aboveground, on utility or light poles. These access points are designed to transmit data from up to 5,000smart meters to the utility company. Access points have a similar AMR transmitter as smart meters,as well as an additional AirCard-system, which communicates with utilities and is similar towireless cards used in laptop computers. AirCards typically operate at 0.251 W, in the 800900
 MHz or 1.9 GHz range.Many smart meters also have a second transmitter that, at some future point in time, will allowcustomers to enable a home access network (HAN). The HAN will allow increased consumer monitoring of electricity use and communication among appliances and the future smart grid. Thisfunctionality is important to achieve the full potential of the smart grid. This second internaltransmitter, for delivery of smart meter data to the consumer, reportedly will operate at a rated power of 0.223W, at frequency of about 2.4 GHz (again, similar to that of cell phones and wireless phones). The actual duty cycle of this transmitter will depend on the design and operation of thehome area network.
2
 
Smart meters will also allow utilities to communicate grid conditions to customers through pricesignals, so that consumers, via their HAN, can
delay nontime sensitive demands
(such as clothesdrying) to a time when electricity is cheapest or has the most benefit to the reliability of the system.In some cases wireless signals interior to the structure will also be able to
automatically adjust theheating and ventilation systems
and to
adjust heat or air conditioning units
. This adaptation to price or reliability signals could reduce overall electricity costs for customers, improve theutilization of renewable and nonrenewable power plants, and cut costs associated with adding
 intermittent wind and solar resources to the grid.
Remote Controlled Switches
If a system is designed to
adjust heat or air conditioning units
it may also use high power controlswitches. The trigger signals for control may be dangerous if any interference occurs in theanalogue or digital communication channels. Interference may be caused by bad AC-wiring, parasitic antennas, insufficient securities in digital coding, RF-interference into digital circuitry, etc.Some of these interference sources may be caused by individual problems in a home's wiringsystem, which may produce huge parasitic antenna loops to catch up RF- and AC-impulses.Other problems may be caused by various applications in the 900 MHZ band, which may beinterfering with the signals. The HAN-system may try to retransmit or respond to commands fromWifi-, cellphones or radiating medical equipment.
Transmitting Power 
Obviously the meters are radiating on two bands: NAN Communications- Frequency: 915-928 MHz- Spread spectrum technology: FHSS- Channels: 43- Receiver sensitivity: -97 dBm for 1% PER - Modulation: Binary FSK - Transmitter output:
30 dBm
HAN Communications- Frequency: 2.4 GHz ISM Band- Spreading technology: Direct Sequence- PHY/MAC: 802.15.4- Transmitter output: 20 to 23 dBm (200 mW)- Receiver sensitivity: -97 dBm for 1% PER - Power, Transmit:
1.6 W (1.8 W max.)
The "2.4GHz" ISM band ranges from 2.4GHz to 2.6GHz. Of course
200mW (or 1.8W) is aLOT of power.
 Reported power density in Microwatts per square centimeter (µW/cm2)
3
 
Adjacent to an electric Smart Meter (1 foot distance - at 50% duty cycle)
200 (µW/cm
2
)
 
Cell phones (at ear)
1,000 (minimum)- 5,000 (maximum) (µW/cm
2
)
3
 
Reported Problems
Fires and burned meters
Amongst the well-known catastrophes we will find a house which may have burned down becauseof a smart meter. Of course some of these problems might also occur at bad wiring or grounding power lines.
Bedroom locations
Some users are reporting meters which have been located at their bedrooms, which does not seem tohave been regulated by the mounting instructions.Understanding Radio Frequency (RF)suggeststhe meter should be
outside the house - on
the other side of the wall 
. In fact if the transmitter is atthe other side of a wall, but one foot from your bed, it may as well be considered to be located
next to your sleeping head 
. In the forum we may identify some dangerous situations (if they are reallytrue and not belonging to fake reports of course) ...“We can no longer use the bedroom
where the meter is located 
and I have headaches andnausea, dizziness, cognitive effects, moderate to severe ringing of the ears all day long, andmore.”“When my smart meters were installed a year ago, it took only five months for me todevelop a painful, volcanically growing facial skin cancer (never had one before). Grew likea large pencil eraser and had to be cut out, leaving a scar and the threat of it returning. This,on the side of my face that was
facing the electric meter on my bedroom wall 
, where I satfor countless hours and read, not understanding that SDG&E had installed the equivalent of a lethal weapon on my home (actually, two of them, one at each end)...“
Light Controls
Others report of a
 security light mounted near the electrical panel 
on my home, switching off andon ad lib.“It has been going on for months now and the other day it dawned on me that it started justabout the time the guy swapped out meters.”The switching signals may have been induced by parasite antenna coupling or by induced RF-signals into the
 security light controls.
Power surges - fried chips
After installing smart meters some documents report power surges, fried chips in (computerized)ceiling fans, failures in air conditioners and other computerized electrical equipment and “rasping pulses of noise” in AM-radios.Although a diagnosis is difficult these incidents also indicate parasitic antenna coupling (destroyingthe RF-sensitive chips, probably connected by long leads at the PCB) or by induced RF-signals tothe wiring. Power surges may be generated by the HAM-system. “Rasping pulses of noise” in AM-radios indicate strong signals, which may be transmitted by the AC-wiring which may be activated by “induced” RF-signals.

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