Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
209Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline - Excerpt 1

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline - Excerpt 1

Ratings:

4.23

(1,082)
|Views: 45,654 |Likes:
At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, READY PLAYER ONE is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

It’s the year 2044, and the real world is an ugly place.

Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes his grim surroundings by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia that lets you be anything you want to be, a place where you can live and play and fall in love on any of ten thousand planets.

And like most of humanity, Wade dreams of being the one to discover the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this virtual world. For somewhere inside this giant networked playground, OASIS creator James Halliday has hidden a series of fiendish puzzles that will yield massive fortune—and remarkable power—to whoever can unlock them.

For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that Halliday’s riddles are based in the pop culture he loved—that of the late twentieth century. And for years, millions have found in this quest another means of escape, retreating into happy, obsessive study of Halliday’s icons. Like many of his contemporaries, Wade is as comfortable debating the finer points of John Hughes’s oeuvre, playing Pac-Man, or reciting Devo lyrics as he is scrounging power to run his OASIS rig.

And then Wade stumbles upon the first puzzle.

Suddenly the whole world is watching, and thousands of competitors join the hunt—among them certain powerful players who are willing to commit very real murder to beat Wade to this prize. Now the only way for Wade to survive and preserve everything he knows is to win. But to do so, he may have to leave behind his oh-so-perfect virtual existence and face up to life—and love—in the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

A world at stake.
A quest for the ultimate prize.
Are you ready?

To read more about Ready Player One or Ernest Cline please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.
At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, READY PLAYER ONE is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

It’s the year 2044, and the real world is an ugly place.

Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes his grim surroundings by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia that lets you be anything you want to be, a place where you can live and play and fall in love on any of ten thousand planets.

And like most of humanity, Wade dreams of being the one to discover the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this virtual world. For somewhere inside this giant networked playground, OASIS creator James Halliday has hidden a series of fiendish puzzles that will yield massive fortune—and remarkable power—to whoever can unlock them.

For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that Halliday’s riddles are based in the pop culture he loved—that of the late twentieth century. And for years, millions have found in this quest another means of escape, retreating into happy, obsessive study of Halliday’s icons. Like many of his contemporaries, Wade is as comfortable debating the finer points of John Hughes’s oeuvre, playing Pac-Man, or reciting Devo lyrics as he is scrounging power to run his OASIS rig.

And then Wade stumbles upon the first puzzle.

Suddenly the whole world is watching, and thousands of competitors join the hunt—among them certain powerful players who are willing to commit very real murder to beat Wade to this prize. Now the only way for Wade to survive and preserve everything he knows is to win. But to do so, he may have to leave behind his oh-so-perfect virtual existence and face up to life—and love—in the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

A world at stake.
A quest for the ultimate prize.
Are you ready?

To read more about Ready Player One or Ernest Cline please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.

More info:

Publish date: Aug 16, 2011
Added to Scribd: Jun 21, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:Buy This BookAmazon
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/15/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
Here are a handful of excellent extras from Ernie Cline to enjoy and share!
Check out Ready Player One on 
 and 
,and visit 
 for the latest news
 
Read up on Ernie’s thoughts on his favorite authors(and kids books!), the movies that changed his life,and his amazing fans with this awesome Q&A.  Embark on your own quest to win a DeLorean! Be thefirst to overcome three increasingly difficult videogame challenges and become the proud owner of a1981 DeLorean – complete with flux capacitor! Checkout the details here.  Launch into uncharted territory with this Map of the
 
Dystopian Universe,featuring some of Ernie’s favorite
 
authors and the most influential dystopian novels forliterary voyagers of all ages. Download a printablecopy here!  Behold! The updated Ready Player One book trailer. 

Activity (209)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
stacey2112 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
If you're a geeklord, like me, this is worth a read just so you can yell things like "Yar's Revenge! No freakin' way!" as you go along. Thick with 80's music & movie references as well, so that was kinda awesome, reliving the ol' glory days!
As far as the story...for me it seemed like two seperate books. The first 2/3 or so of the book I loved, the contrast between the harsh world of reality and the addictively perfect world of the Oasis was palpable,the protagonist was sympathetic, the futuristic world was imaginative & meticulously detailed. The quest was great! At this point I was enchanted by the story, anadventure book for adults.
Unfortunately the final 1/3 or so of the book felt like watered down sci-fi. Too black&white, simplistic... soulless bad guys vs. our group of protagonists, who for my money were getting pretty cocky & obnoxious by this point (granted, they were a bunch of socially awkard teenagers...) Luckily it got back to the quest by the end & redeemed itself a bit, but I was feeling a solid 5 starting out & am sad to give it closer to a 4.
Overall it was entertaining but I think could have been more, even felt sort of "Young Adult" for me by the end, everything wrapped up a little too neatly. The romance was kind of cute. :)
I'm really glad I read it, I don't want to sound TOO harsh! I just started out loving it SO much! 4.25
debbiebspinner reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This was a fun romp. I have enough geek background to have understood 95% of the references, and played a lot of the games.
anderlawlor reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I'm still getting my head around the intense referentiality of this book; perhaps the treatment of '80s nostalgia would be interesting to someone who didn't live through that decade, but for me the nostalgia was boring because all the references were to the lowest common denominator straight white boy geek culture (games, music, movies, TV). I was reminded of how boring that culture always was, how not particularly "alternative" or progressive the world of gaming was/is.

I think Cline's heart was certainly in the right place, in his descriptions of the world outside OASIS (the all-consuming interactive game everyone plays in the near future), but I don't think he went deep enough into the implications of this sort of world. This world had a dystopian-lite quality that I found disturbing. The character Art3mis's vague philanthropic leanings feel like social-conscience window dressing, another way to make her into a sexy smart girl who the "hero" can admire and win over.

SPOILER ALERT: Very early on, the protagonist's entire family (abusive and extended, sure, but kin) and community is murdered, with basically no emotional impact. And most of the plot is a version of "boy completes quest and is rewarded with girl" which even the most mainstream '80s movies had the good sense to at least question.

READY PLAYER ONE is well-crafted in that it's gripping, takes the reader on a ride, ends conclusively, all that. The supposed fun of the story has to do with solving a puzzle, but it's not really a puzzle for the reader. Reading this book was like watching someone else play a video game.
shanaqui_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This book is an enjoyable nostalgia-fest for classic video games (and music, and literature). It misses out some stuff that I'm sure a geek of this calibre would've loved unless he died in the eighties (which isn't the case), but it's still fun. If you love gaming and the internet and the idea of a virtual reality that you can plug yourself into and live in, then you'll probably be interested.

Of course, it is about a teenage boy, so there's the attendant immaturity and some creep factor (hello, there is nothing noble and wonderful about looking through the girl you like's files without her knowledge or permission to find out what she really looks like; just because someone else collected the information doesn't make it less creepy). I liked the twist about Aech, though, and Art3mis is pretty awesome.

It did bother me that emotional impact was lacking. Poor Mrs Gilmore gets mentioned a couple of times, but the narrator doesn't make you feel the guilt he says he's feeling, and he skips over it easily. There are a couple of deaths in this book you should feel something about, and you... don't. Part of that is the whole gaming-culture idea of having another life in reserve, I guess, and maybe it's intentional that that bleeds through to real life too.

Still, it's a fun book, and it made me want to go play Pac-Man and so on until my eyes go square, which I suspect it was meant to do.

I wouldn't say it's particularly YA, despite the age group of the protagonists. They have quite juvenile concerns, it's true, but the nostalgia is not aimed at this generation's teenagers.
walterqchocobo reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This was a fun book although Wil Wheaton's narration got off to a slow start. He seemed to get into it as the book went on. The premise: in the near future, the planet begins to run out of resources and energy shortages are everywhere. To escape the world's problems, most people log into a huge online game/simulator called the Oasis. The game's creator dies and leaves his huge fortune to the first person that finds an "easter egg" hidden inside his game. To find the egg, users have to play a game within the game by using cryptic clues involving 80s video games and movies left by the creator. Lots of nerdy nostalgia involving the 80s. You don't have to be a gamer to enjoy this book but it helps getting some of the sly references.
erickibler reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This is one of those science fiction novels you'll be nostalgic for. One of those that's pure, hurtling story, moving like a freight train as you hang on for dear life. It's not hard science fiction. It's not literary science fiction. It's plot based; a page turner. And boy oh boy will you be turning those pages.

The premise is: It's 30 years in the future, and the planet Earth is a mess. One of the things that makes it livable is the OASIS, a virtual online world. A giant sandbox-type video game, if you will. People escape from their drab lives by logging on and living out their adventure fantasies. When the developer/owner of OASIS dies, his will leaves everything to the winner of a contest, which itself is the ultimate video game. Think Willy Wonka with a joystick.

I liken this book to other plot-based SF I've loved in the past:

Hunger Games
Logan's Run
Dying of the Light
Ender's Game

If you've liked any of these, don't walk. RUN out and get this book.
eidzior_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This book is full of so much awesomness that I couldn't stop reading it. I've never been a big gamer so much of it was lost on me but the stortelling and story were both spot on and I just couldn't get over how caught up in the story I got. I'll definitely be buying this one and reading it again. So good!!
tanya8dogearedcopy reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Wade Owen Watts is a teenaged gamer escaping the reality of life in the stacks (RVs and trailers stacked one atop the other in towers) in Oklahoma City. The year is 2044 and it's the third decade of The Great Recession in America. Infrastructure has deteriorated and people look to the cost-efficient technology of virtual reality for entertainment and education. In fact, the "massively multi-player online virtual reality reality game" of OASIS has become for many, the preferred existence: a place where you can create a better version of yourself and live a more interesting life.

"Parzival" is Wade Watts' avatar in OASIS and Parzival is playing a contest within the realms of OASIS, a game within the game wherein the objective is to locate three keys that will ultimately lead to an Easter egg. The winner of this contest will inherit Jame Halliday's (co-creator of OASIS) fortune and interest in G.S.S. (Gregarious Simulation Systems) - the company that has top administrative control of OASIS. The power and revenue of this fortune and interest are immense and so the competition for each of the keys and the Easter Egg is stiff. Wade/Parzival must battle IOI, a mega-corp with deep resources, both in OASIS and IRL for the Easter Egg.

Ready Player One is the ultimate story about quest gaming and what makes it more fun is that OASIS is an homage to the 1980s - a time when computer generated gaming starting elbowing out the pinball machines in arcades. There are references to the arcade games themselves (in fact Parzival plays them - in effect becoming an uber meta-gamer in that he's playing a game within a game within a game that has IRL consequences) as well a number of other cultural references from the eighties. If you're not a gamer or not familiar with the references, you might feel like you're missing something; but most of it is sufficiently explained to ameliorate any bewilderment; but if you are familiar with gaming and/or remember the eighties, Ready Player One flows without seeming didactic.

Wil Wheaton, the eighties icon known as the actor who played Wesley Crusher in the television series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, is the narrator for Ready Player One; and he was the perfect choice. He sounds like a young adult and handles the all the time-cultural references easily and naturally. In another very cool meta experience, Wil Wheaton's name occurs within the story :-)

Ready Player One is a fun, clever story and the audio is an equally fun and clever production in its choice of narrator.

Redacted from the original blog review at dog eared copy, Ready Player One; 03/27/2012
akmargie reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Incredible book. Reminded me of a cross between Cory Doctorow and Otherland, this Tad Williams epic sci-fi series that took me four years to read. The cultural references were well played and was an interesting perspective to show how pop culture can be recycled and remixed. Cline creates a vibrant and amazing world. My only nitpick is...the ending. Yeah I know I harsh on endings a lot but this one was just a bit too perfect, the conflict resolved a bit too easily.
alycias_8 reviewed this
mjg just got this as a gift and we both can't really believe it. It's so overblown that he can't help but read it out loud to me...

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download