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Bune practici in promovarea creativitatii

Bune practici in promovarea creativitatii

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Published by Proiectul SOS

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Published by: Proiectul SOS on Jun 22, 2011
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04/13/2014

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Emerging Good Practice in Promoting Creativity
A report by HMIE
 
March 2006
 
 
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Emerging good practice in promoting creativity
1. Introduction …………………………………………………… page 32. Understanding creativity …………………………………….. page 43. Emerging good practice and issues ………………………….. page 64. Learning, teaching and creativity …………………………… page 135. The role of ICT ……………………………………………….. page 146. Evaluating creativity ………………………………………….. page 157. Support for creativity ………………………………………… page 168. Conclusions …………………………………………………… page 189. Useful links …………………………………………………… page 20
 
 
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 1. Introduction
The National Priorities, published in 2001, highlight important outcomes of education inScotland. National Priority 5 sets a clear expectation that teachers will ‘encourage creativityand ambition’ in their pupils. ‘
 A Curriculum for Excellence’ 
1 also stresses that pupils need to be able to ‘think creatively and independently’ to become ‘successful learners’.In implementing the National Priorities, many schools have responded enthusiastically to theidea of promoting creativity. They have engaged in imaginative and wide-ranging practices to promote and develop creativity in learners and teachers. However, at the same time manyteachers have been concerned by a lack of clarity about what creativity means and remainuncertain about the best ways to promote it. Schools and education authorities have alsostruggled to know how to evaluate their success in promoting creativity and have been unsureabout what might be considered as evidence of that success.In response to a request from the Scottish Executive Education Department, HMIE hasgathered evidence
 
to identify and analyse emerging good practice in promoting creativity, and
 
to provide advice on a range of issues related to creativity including learning andteaching, assessment, and current practice in evaluating success in promotingcreativity.This report is based on evidence from inspections of pre-school centres, primary andsecondary schools and community learning and development (CLD). HM inspectors visitedestablishments to observe good practice. They gathered views from student teachers,teachers, headteachers, educational psychologists, subject advisers and HMIE colleagues.They attended staff development events organised by education authorities and Tapestry
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andmet professional staff involved with Chartered Teacher accreditation and the ScottishQualification for Headship (SQH). In addition, they collected evidence of some specific projects identified by teachers as contributing to the development of pupils’ creative skills.
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‘A Curriculum for Excellence’ 
was published by the Scottish Executive in 2004. It was prepared by theCurriculum Review Group, charged with supporting an improved curriculum 3 – 18 following the NationalDebate on education.
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Tapestry works in partnership with a number of universities and organisations to make leading edge thinkingand research accessible to the education community in Scotland. More details of their work can be found insection 7 – Support for creativity. Their conferences, seminars and workshops have been very well attended.

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