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News Report on Conflict of Sri Lanka_Wei Xuan_36

News Report on Conflict of Sri Lanka_Wei Xuan_36

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Published by xanderwx
3EA’11 SS Edition
11

ALL ABOUT THE BIG WORLD WE LIVE IN

TIMES

Brief History Of Sri LankA before Conflict
The ethnic conflict between the Sinhalese and Tamils in Sri Lanka has a history spanning more than 100 years. It began when Sri Lanka was under the British colonial rule, as resentment was created when the Tamil minority was privileged over the Sinhalese for jobs and educational opportunities. The reversed happened when Sri Lanka became independent in 1948, as the Sri Lanka government pass
3EA’11 SS Edition
11

ALL ABOUT THE BIG WORLD WE LIVE IN

TIMES

Brief History Of Sri LankA before Conflict
The ethnic conflict between the Sinhalese and Tamils in Sri Lanka has a history spanning more than 100 years. It began when Sri Lanka was under the British colonial rule, as resentment was created when the Tamil minority was privileged over the Sinhalese for jobs and educational opportunities. The reversed happened when Sri Lanka became independent in 1948, as the Sri Lanka government pass

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Published by: xanderwx on Jun 25, 2011
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06/25/2011

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11 
The ethnic conflict between the Sinhalese and Tamils in Sri Lanka has ahistory spanning more than 100 years. It began when Sri Lanka was underthe British colonial rule, as resentment was created when the Tamilminority was privileged over the Sinhalese for jobs and educationalopportunities. The reversed happened when Sri Lanka becameindependent in 1948, as the Sri Lanka government passed the CeylonCitizenship Act and the 'Sinhala Only' Official Language Act, making lifeincreasingly difficult for the Tamils. Ethnic violence erupted during the1950s and 1960s as a result of the perceived unfair treatment. Furtherunhappiness was caused with the introduction of new and more stringentuniversity admission criteria for Tamils after 1970 to limit theirenrolment in university, as well as the resettlement policy implementedduring the 1950s, when Sinhalese peasants, and even the Sri Lanka Armymoved in and took over areas occupied by Tamils. The unjust treatment ofTamils was the impetus for the formation of the Tamil United LiberationFront, a new political party created to fight for Tamil rights. Out of thisarose the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam ,a youth militant group whoadopted violence as a means to achieve their goal - to have a separate andindependent Tamil state.In 1948, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) enjoyed the highest literacy rate in Asia. Itdid not have the problem of over-population; its educational andtransportation systems were advanced. For some years, Ceylon was amodel for the world. But, today, it is an island known for its problems, andits reputation as a killing field only matched by that of countries such asRwanda.
- Adapted from a comment by an editor of a Tamil newspaper in 2003.
 
TIMES
3EA’11 SS Edition
Exclusive News Today 
 ALL ABOUT THE BIG WORLD WE LIVE IN 
Brief History Of Sri LankA
before Conflict 
 
Destruction In Sri LankaHead Rolling Moments
 
Pg 2 - 4Pg 4 - 7
 
NORTHLANDTIMES |3EA’11 Edition2
 
When Sri Lanka gained independence in 1948, the Sri Lankan governmentpassed the Ceylon Citizenship Act of 1948. This act granted citizenshiponly to those either born in Sri Lanka or those whose forefathers wereborn there. As a result, many Tamils found themselves stateless. Thoughthey had lived in Sri Lanka for many years, the Indian Tamils did not havebasic rights like education,jobs, housing and voting. However, they continuedto work on the tea plantations and contributed significantly to the Sri Lankan economy. TheTamils felt resentful because they were not allowed a say in the running of the country even thoughthey contributed economically to it. Being denied voting rights meant that they could not vote forpoliticians who could restore their rights and improve their lives. And by being denied education andhousing, they were condemned to live their lives in poverty and suffering. The oppression they sufferedled them to use violent means in order to reclaim their rights.
Factor:Citizenship RightsFactor:Sinhala Only’ Policy
 
When Sri Lanka was under British rule, English-educated Tamils could enter government service and bepromoted. They occupied some of the most powerful jobs in the government service although they were theminority in the country. The Sinhalese, although the majority, were disadvantaged because they could not readand write well in English. After Sri Lanka achieved independence, English remained the official language. However,
in 1956, Sinhala was declared the country’s official language under the Official L
anguage Act and used as thelanguage of administration in Sri Lanka. Tamils in the government were given three years to learn Sinhala or bedismissed. They were upset as they found it difficult to find jobs or be promoted. The sudden change in thelanguage policy caught the Tamils off-guard and made them feel that it was a deliberate attempt by theSinhalese government to humiliate them and force them to quit their civil service jobs. This led to rising tensionsbetween both ethnic groups which might have led to conflict.
TIMES
 ALL ABOUT THE BIG WORLD WE LIVE IN 
 
NORTHLANDTIMES |3EA’11 Edition3
Factor:Sinhala Only’ Policy
 
Example of how Sinhala, Tamil and English are usedin an official document such as an application formfor citizenshipLanguages Spoken By People In Sri Lanka
Factor:University Admission Criteria
Before 1970, university admission was based on merit and the examinations were in English. This policy benefitedthe English-educated Tamils and they scored well in examinations. The proportion of Tamils admitted touniversity was significantly higher that their proportion in the population. After 1970, the government introducednew university admission criteria. Tamil students had to score higher marks than Sinhalese students to enter thesame courses in universities. A fixed number of places were also reserved for the Sinhalese. Admission was nolonger based solely on academic results. When the Tamils were deprived of higher education, they were not ableto find gainful employment or land prestigious jobs. This denied them of any opportunity of improving their socialand economic status in Sri Lankan society. This made them resent the Sinhalese.
TIMES
 ALL ABOUT THE BIG WORLD WE LIVE IN 

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