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Neil Brodie et al (2000), Stealing History: The Illicit Trade in Cultural Material, Commissioned by: ICOM UK and Museums Association, Published by The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research

Neil Brodie et al (2000), Stealing History: The Illicit Trade in Cultural Material, Commissioned by: ICOM UK and Museums Association, Published by The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research

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Published by: ArchaeoinAction on Jun 29, 2011
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09/24/2013

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STEALING HISTORY:
THE ILLICIT TRADE IN CULTURAL MATERIAL
Neil Brodie, Jenny Doole and Peter Watson 
STEALING HISTORY:
THE ILLICIT TRADE IN CULTURAL MATERIAL
Neil Brodie, Jenny Doole and Peter Watson 
 
Commissioned by:ICOM UK and Museums Association
2000Published byThe McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research ______________________ 
The McDonald Institute for Archaeological ResearchDowning StCambridge CB2 3ERTel: 01223 333538 Fax: 01223 333536ICOM UKSEMS OfficeThe Garden RoomHistoric Dockyard, ChathamKent ME4 4TETel 01634 405031 Fax 01634 840795Museums Association42 Clerkenwell Close, London EC1R 0PATel 020 7250 1789 Fax 020 7250 1929E-mail info@museumsassociation.orgCopyright McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research 2000ISBN 1-902937-10-4
The report was overseen by a steering group made up as follows:Patrick Boylan, Gaynor Kavanagh Max Hebditch (chair), Louise Smith, Mary Yule
Cover: Guardian figure, which originally had an animal head, at Khmer temple of Banteay Srei, Cambodia 
STEALING HISTORY:
THE ILLICIT TRADE IN CULTURAL MATERIAL
Neil Brodie, Jenny Doole and Peter Watson 
 
This report reveals the illicit exploitation of the world’s cultural resources -a destructive and often criminal enterprise. Modern day looting is greater inscale than any carried out in the past, with results that are usually beyondrepair. The damage caused to the heritage of humanity and to the historyand traditions of living communities is appalling. Action is needed now tostop this plunder.The report is concerned with items that are being illicitly removed from theiroriginal contexts. The focus is on archaeological material, but examples areincluded from areas as diverse as palaeontology, architectural sculpture andthe material heritage of communities throughout the world.The report does not attempt to discuss the illicit trade in fine art, nor therelated issue of the repatriation of items that have been in museum collectionsfor decades, nor Nazi war loot, nor indeed current cases of theft from museumand private collections. The trade in stolen fine art is also now of such a scale,and is so enmeshed with other criminal activities such as money laundering, thatlike the trade in cultural material, its full investigation would require a separatereport.This report starts with a description of the illicit trade in cultural material, itsorganisation, the destruction it causes and the role of the art trade in the UK.Legal deterrents and loopholes and the roles of government are discussednext. Finally, consideration is given to what measures might be taken bymuseums to protect themselves from unwitting participation in thetrade and what role they might play in impeding it.
Destroyed Roman mosaic at Zeugma, Turkey, 1990s Photo: David Kennedy 
STEALING HISTORY:
THE ILLICIT TRADE IN CULTURAL MATERIAL
Neil Brodie, Jenny Doole and Peter Watson 

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