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Communications for the Ones Who Never Spoke: Running the MIM Marathon in the Peruvian Highlands (May 2011)

Communications for the Ones Who Never Spoke: Running the MIM Marathon in the Peruvian Highlands (May 2011)

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Published by IFCpublications
How do you bring public accountability for millions of dollars to a region where the population is largely uninformed and lacks the savvy to monitor the actions of the authorities? IFC, with support of donor partners, responded to a situation in Peru with an innovative project: Improving Municipal Investment (Mejorando la Inversión Municipal in Spanish, or MIM).

This SmartLesson shares lessons learned about developing effective communications during project implementation.
How do you bring public accountability for millions of dollars to a region where the population is largely uninformed and lacks the savvy to monitor the actions of the authorities? IFC, with support of donor partners, responded to a situation in Peru with an innovative project: Improving Municipal Investment (Mejorando la Inversión Municipal in Spanish, or MIM).

This SmartLesson shares lessons learned about developing effective communications during project implementation.

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Published by: IFCpublications on Jun 29, 2011
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12/07/2011

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SMARTLESSONS — MAY 2011
1
ABOUT THE AUTHORSKARLA DIAZ CLARKE
is an Associate OperationsOcer in the IFC SustainableBusiness Advisory team, LAC,working on StrategicCommunity Investmentactivities.
FERNANDO RUIZ-MIER
is a Senior Operations Ocerin the IFC Sustainable BusinessAdvisory team, leading theStrategic CommnuityInvestment activities in LAC.
APPROVING MANAGER
Juan Gonzalo Flores,Sustainable Business AdvisoryManager, LAC.
COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE ONES WHONEVER SPOKE:
Running the MIM Marathon in the Peruvian Highlands
How do you bring public accountability or millions o dollars to a regionwhere the population is largely uninormed and lacks the savvy to monitor the actions o the authorities? From 2006 to 2011, the mining industry inPeru transerred over $4,774 million in royalties to municipalities located inkey mining regions, in compliance with a 2004 mining canon law, but local ofcials have not always put these unds to the best use. With the support o Canadian, U.S., U.K. and Norwegian (through CommDev) donor partners,IFC responded to this need with an innovative project: Improving Municipal Investment (Mejorando la Inversión Municipal in Spanish, or MIM). MIMPeru empowers the population—gives them a voice—to demand accountability rom their authorities in the use o royalties. For this Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) initiative, communications are essential. And the project team learned that developing eective communication is not a sprint—it’s a marathon! This SmartLesson shares lessons learned about communications during project implementation.Background 
 
Municipalities in Peru’s mining regions arepoor and located in remote areas, so royaltiesoer a great opportunity to improve people’slives. However, these resources have notnecessarily gone to projects that benet theneedy. Some have been used to buildunnecessary monuments or projects, such as astadium with a capacity greater than thetown’s population.The MIM Peru project seeks to promotemunicipal social accountability or the use oroyalties—by monitoring royalty fows,disseminating inormation, buildingcapacities, and engaging key stakeholdersrom the population. It started in 2005 as apilot, monitoring two municipalities in theCajamarca region. It now monitors 23municipalities in seven Peruvian regions.MIM Peru has gained the recognition o thepopulation and o authorities. In the words oFrancisco Chavez, deputy mayor o theprovincial municipality o Mariscal Nieto,
“  
It is still necessary to improve transparency and citizen participation, and I think MIM plays an important role, as it provides us with information and ideas about the community’s perception about our management.” 
 
MIM volunteers in Cajamarca are ready or astreet theater perormance to teach ruralcommunities about royalties and municipalinvestment.
MAY 2011
 
2
SMARTLESSONS — MAY 2011
Lessons Learned: On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!
1) To win the race, don’t be araid to change the good or the better.
Initially, the communications strategy had an operationalapproach—ocusing on dening the content to bedisseminated, determining the requency o publications,and reaching the population.Halway through the project, we switched to a morestrategic approach—ocusing on changing behaviors andattitudes in key target audiences. This meant:
•Prioritizingkeyaudiences•Analyzingcurrentandexpectedbehaviors•Identifyingknowledgeneedsandattitudesrequiredfor
desired behaviors to start occurring, as well as barriersand acilitators
•Mappingstakeholders•Deningtheappropriatecombinationof
communications products or each target audience.This change in the approach proved to be an eective way
toalignprojectactivitieswithexpectedbehavioralchanges
or each target group, dene specic objectives, prioritizeactions, and eectively use communications materialsbased on the specicities and needs o each group. It alsohelped us dene behavioral-change indicators or eachtarget audience, which acilitated monitoring the evolutiono the project results.
WiththevaluablehelpthattheLACCommunicationsTeam
provided during the transition, the project team also
changeditsperceptionofcommunication.Asaresult,the
communications strategy became part o the projectimplementation at dierent levels, touching every activityand material output that the project undertook.
 2) Just like Gatorade, development projects need a littlemarketing, too.
Use o a brand is an eective way to position the initiativeto obtain positive results. The team recognized this at anearly stage and dened the attributes it wanted its brandto represent. This guided the denition o the values—reliability and independence—that would be associatedwith the brand, the graphic and visual identity o it, and thekey messages that it would convey to the public. (See Figure1)Partnering with local institutions was also essential or thesuccess o this initiative. Selection o local partners wasbased on such characteristics as good reputation, roots inthe community, impartiality toward the mining industry,and interest in supporting local development, values thatthey would transer to the MIM.Each MIM partnered with 5 to 7 local civil societyorganizations which are represented in the boards odirectors.
Awell-denedbrandhelpedpositionMIMPeruasthelocal
resource or reliable inormation on royalties and municipalinvestment. It resulted in a better understanding o theinitiative and created conditions that supported the smoothimplementation o its activities.Currently, the MIM Peru brand is associated withindependence, impartiality, reliability, and credibility.Survey results show that, by project completion, 20 percento the population in the regions recognized the brand
1
,which refects the positioning and awareness that theproject created.
3) When sharing the spotlight, keep your dimmershandy.
Managing brands goes hand in hand with managing thevisibility o dierent partners. The project teamed up with 36local institutions rom seven regions in Peru (businessassociations, proessional associations, and universities) thatvoluntarily participate to promote social accountability intheir regions. The project also was supported by our donors,all o which had dierent interests and visibility requirements.Initially, we wanted to grant equal visibility to all involved, soall MIM materials eatured the MIM logo along with thelogos o all o the partners—IFC, the donors, and the localinstitutions—which made approval or each publication avery lengthy process! (see Figure 2)
1
 
According to a study undertaken by the frm Arellano Marketingcommissioned by El Comercio Newspaper in May 2011, the recognition o MIM in the seven regions it works is comparable to that o Mitsubishi cars inthe fve regions o Peru with the higher consumption levels.
“MIM’s work helps strengthen the municipal government through the recommendations they give to improve the quality o our expenditures.” 
 
Ricardo Alvarez, First Reagent, Provincial Municipality of Puno
“MIM gives us numbers to analyze and make us think about the work we do.” 
 Javier Ponce, Reagent, Provincial Municipality of Puno
Figure 1: Branding MIM Peru
The logo conception
 
 
An eye that sees everything
 
A rising sun that sheds light allowing to see
 
SMARTLESSONS — MAY 2011
3
Figure 2: MIM Publications—Beore, with Logos o LocalInstitutions, IFC, and DonorsFigure 3: MIM Publications—Ater, with Logos o LocalInstitutionsFigure 4: MIM Toolkit, Ater, with Logos rom IFC and Donors
 

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