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Table Of Contents

1 General
1.2 Normative references
1.2.1 International standards
1.2.2 European standards
1.2.3 Other references
1.3.1 Active equipment
1.3.2 Equipotential lines
1.3.3 Machine
1.3.4 Machine attachment cabling
1.3.5 Machine distributor
1.3.6 Machine network
1.3.7 Machine network interface
1.3.8 Machine outlet
1.3.9 PE conductor
1.3.10 PEN conductor
1.3.11 Permanent cabling
1.3.12 Flexible cabling
1.4 Comparison between office and industrial installation
1.4.1 Topology
1.4.2 Components
2 System planning
2.1.1 Conformance with and difference to existing standards
2.1.3 Redundancy links
2.1.4 Machine outlet = connection interface to the generic cabling
2.1.5 Link length
2.1.6 Bus topology
2.1.7 Ring topology
2.1.8 Process control example
2.2 General requirements
2.3 Environment protection classes
2.4 Selection of passive components
2.4.1.1 Copper cable
2.4.1.2 Fiber optic cable
2.4.1.2.1 Mechanical requirements
2.4.1.2.2 Fiber types
2.4.1.2.3 Applications
2.4.2 Connectors
2.4.2.1 General
2.4.2.2 Copper connectors
2.4.2.3 Fiber optic connectors
2.4.2.4 Hybrid connectors
2.5 Selection of active components
2.5.1 Bandwidth profiles
2.5.1.1 Applications
2.5.1.2 Response times
2.5.2 Links (ISO layer 1)
2.5.2.1 Network expansion for hub based systems
2.5.2.2 Link media and link lengths
2.5.3 Segmentation of Ethernet domains (ISO Layer 2)
2.5.3.1 Ethernet hubs
2.5.3.2 Ethernet switches
2.5.3.3 Priority switching (IEEE 802.1D)
2.5.3.4 VLAN (IEEE 802.1Q)
2.5.3.5 Real time Ethernet
2.5.4 Segmentation of IP subnetworks (ISO layer 3)
2.5.4.1 Routers
2.5.4.2 IP switches
2.5.5 Network security (ISO layer 4 and above)
2.5.6 Network availability
2.5.6.1 Redundant links
2.5.6.1.1 Port redundancy
2.5.6.1.2 Link aggregation
2.5.6.1.3 Spanning tree protocol STP
2.5.6.1.4 Dual homing
2.5.6.1.5 Ring redundancy
2.5.6.2 Hardware redundancy
2.5.7 Management
2.6 System calculation
2.6.1 Electrical cabling
2.6.1.1 Channel requirements
2.6.1.2 Link requirements
2.6.2 Fiber optic cabling
2.6.2.1 Cable lengths
2.6.2.2 Power budget
3 System installation
3.1 Installation of copper cabling
3.1.1 Electrical connectors
3.1.2 Cabling in light-duty environment – general wiring guidelines
3.1.2.1 Wiring external to enclosures
3.1.2.2 Wiring inside enclosures
3.1.2.3 Mechanical stress
3.1.2.4 Electromagnetic interference
3.1.2.5 Conductor lead-in in switch cabinets
3.1.2.6 Conductor lead-in in buildings
3.1.3 Cabling in heavy-duty environment
3.1.3.1 Conductor lead-in outside of buildings
3.1.4 Electromagnetic compatibility
3.1.5 Screening
3.1.5.1 Screening installation guidelines
3.1.5.2 Local requirements
3.1.6 Bonding and earthing
3.1.6.1 Earthing system
3.1.6.2 Checklist
3.1.6.3 National requirements
3.1.6.3.1 Germany
3.1.7 Installation in an area with grounded reference potential
3.2 Installation of fiber optic cable
3.2.1 Cabling in light-duty environment – general wiring guidelines
3.2.2 Cabling in heavy-duty environment
3.2.3 Cabling outdoor
3.2.4 Fiber optic connectors
3.5 Documentation
4 Conformance tests
4.1 Length of permanent links and channels
4.2 Overview of tests for copper channels
4.3 Overview of tests for fiber optic cabling
5 Annex
5.1 Dimensioning the network
5.1.1 Network expansion
5.2.1.4 Cable length testing
5.2.1.5 Attenuation testing
5.2.1.6 Near-end crosstalk (NEXT) testing
5.2.1.7 Attenuation to crosstalk ratio (ACR)
5.2.1.8 ELFEXT
5.2.1.9 Return loss
5.2.1.10 PowerSum measurements
5.2.1.11 Delay and skew test
5.2.1.12 Connecting point issues
5.2.2 Fiber optic cabling
5.2.2.1 Differences between singlemode and multimode fiber
5.2.2.3 Fiber optic test tools
5.2.2.3.1 Basic fault finders
5.2.2.3.2 Power loss meters
5.2.2.3.3 Add-on fiber kits for copper test equipment
5.2.2.3.4 OTDR testers
5.2.2.4 Optical power loss measurement procedures
5.2.2.4.1 Calculating maximum loss budget
5.2.2.4.2 Measuring link loss
5.2.2.4.3 Why measure both light wavelengths?
5.2.2.4.4 Why measure in both directions?
5.2.2.4.5 Loss measurement test results documentation
5.2.2.4.6 What causes failing loss measurements?
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Industrial Ethernet Planning and Installation Guide

Industrial Ethernet Planning and Installation Guide

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Published by: Ashutosh Vishwakarma on Jul 01, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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