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Political Polytheism

Political Polytheism

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Published by A.J. MacDonald, Jr.
In 1787, every nation on earth was openly religious. Rulers and citizens around the world affirmed the existence of a particular god, and they called upon their god publicly to defend the nation, bless it, and bring his will to pass in history. Even in those religions that affirm no god, such as Buddhism, the people affirmed their faith in a particular religion. Nations were explicitly religious.
There was only one exception to this rule in all the earth, one isolated political experiment that had affirmed the possibility-even the moral necessity-of avoiding all public references to religion in its covenantal charter. Its founder believed that no city, not state, and no nation should ever publicly affirm the existence of any particular god or religion. This was the first public experiment in secular humanism. In 1787, it had been in operation for a century and a half. That experiment was called Rhode Island.
Three and a half centuries after its founding, Rhode Island's vision of political order has conquered the Western world.
Forty miles north of Providence, Rhode Island, another experiment was in progress in 1640. In Boston dwelled the Puritans, the most self-consciously biblical people in history. They had turned to the Bible in search of moral and political order. Their Body of Liberties (1641) served as their political charter, and that charter was biblical to the core, even citing specific Bible verses to justify its laws.
It was against the Puritans' vision of a New Israel in the New England wilderness that the citizens of Rhode Island rebelled, and in doing so, they led the world, step by step, into a politically conspiracy against God.
Governor John Winthrop in 1630 had hoped that Massachusetts would serve the whole world as a city on a hill, a bright beacon of biblical Christianity that would persuade men to construct a biblical civil order in their lands. But is was not Winthrop's beacon that illuminated the future; it was Roger Williams' beacon, a blinding light that promised autonomy from God for humanist political man.
That light has blinded Winthrop's Christian heirs. The thought that a nation can and should be explicitly, publicly Christian is unacceptable to men and women who openly affirm the need for Christian families, Christian schools, and Christian everything else.
"There is no neutrality," they proclaim, until someone mentions civil government. Then they back off. Here, apparently, there has to be neutrality. Somewhere. Somehow.
Meanwhile, the American Civil Liberties Union takes another small town into court for putting up a manger scene at Christmas on public property. Meanwhile, another high school coach is threatened with dismissal for praying with his team before a game. Meanwhile, evolution is taught as a fact in just about every public school biology textbook.
Neutrality, you understand. Just good, old fashioned neutrality.
Believe that, and you'll believe anything.
Boston vs. Providence, Winthrop vs. Williams: in this classic confrontation we can see the beginning of a war that has lasted for three and a half centuries, a war not just for American civilization but for world civilization. For the most part, American Christians have applauded Williams. Also for the most part, they are in political and cultural bondage.
In Political Polytheism Dr. Gary North sets forth a challenge to the reigning political philosophy of our day, a philosophy which says that God's people must remain politically silent, that neutrality is a valid religion, and that the King of history must confine Himself to the home, the church, and the funeral parlor. Everything else belongs to autonomous man, this religion asserts.
Not so, say Dr. North. Everything belongs to the God of the Bible, and the only way that mankind can build a free society and maintain it is to honor this principle in every area of life.
Political Polytheism pulls no punches. It takes on all comers: humanists, Christian philosophers, and historians. E
In 1787, every nation on earth was openly religious. Rulers and citizens around the world affirmed the existence of a particular god, and they called upon their god publicly to defend the nation, bless it, and bring his will to pass in history. Even in those religions that affirm no god, such as Buddhism, the people affirmed their faith in a particular religion. Nations were explicitly religious.
There was only one exception to this rule in all the earth, one isolated political experiment that had affirmed the possibility-even the moral necessity-of avoiding all public references to religion in its covenantal charter. Its founder believed that no city, not state, and no nation should ever publicly affirm the existence of any particular god or religion. This was the first public experiment in secular humanism. In 1787, it had been in operation for a century and a half. That experiment was called Rhode Island.
Three and a half centuries after its founding, Rhode Island's vision of political order has conquered the Western world.
Forty miles north of Providence, Rhode Island, another experiment was in progress in 1640. In Boston dwelled the Puritans, the most self-consciously biblical people in history. They had turned to the Bible in search of moral and political order. Their Body of Liberties (1641) served as their political charter, and that charter was biblical to the core, even citing specific Bible verses to justify its laws.
It was against the Puritans' vision of a New Israel in the New England wilderness that the citizens of Rhode Island rebelled, and in doing so, they led the world, step by step, into a politically conspiracy against God.
Governor John Winthrop in 1630 had hoped that Massachusetts would serve the whole world as a city on a hill, a bright beacon of biblical Christianity that would persuade men to construct a biblical civil order in their lands. But is was not Winthrop's beacon that illuminated the future; it was Roger Williams' beacon, a blinding light that promised autonomy from God for humanist political man.
That light has blinded Winthrop's Christian heirs. The thought that a nation can and should be explicitly, publicly Christian is unacceptable to men and women who openly affirm the need for Christian families, Christian schools, and Christian everything else.
"There is no neutrality," they proclaim, until someone mentions civil government. Then they back off. Here, apparently, there has to be neutrality. Somewhere. Somehow.
Meanwhile, the American Civil Liberties Union takes another small town into court for putting up a manger scene at Christmas on public property. Meanwhile, another high school coach is threatened with dismissal for praying with his team before a game. Meanwhile, evolution is taught as a fact in just about every public school biology textbook.
Neutrality, you understand. Just good, old fashioned neutrality.
Believe that, and you'll believe anything.
Boston vs. Providence, Winthrop vs. Williams: in this classic confrontation we can see the beginning of a war that has lasted for three and a half centuries, a war not just for American civilization but for world civilization. For the most part, American Christians have applauded Williams. Also for the most part, they are in political and cultural bondage.
In Political Polytheism Dr. Gary North sets forth a challenge to the reigning political philosophy of our day, a philosophy which says that God's people must remain politically silent, that neutrality is a valid religion, and that the King of history must confine Himself to the home, the church, and the funeral parlor. Everything else belongs to autonomous man, this religion asserts.
Not so, say Dr. North. Everything belongs to the God of the Bible, and the only way that mankind can build a free society and maintain it is to honor this principle in every area of life.
Political Polytheism pulls no punches. It takes on all comers: humanists, Christian philosophers, and historians. E

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Published by: A.J. MacDonald, Jr. on Jul 02, 2011
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08/14/2011

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POLITICAL
POLYTHEISM
 
Other books by Gary North
 Marx’s Religion of Revolution, 1968 [1989]
 An Introduction to Christian Economics, 1973
Unconditional
Surrendq
1981 [1988]
Successful Investing in an Age of Envy, 1981
The Dominion Covenant: Genesis, 1982 [1987]
Government
 By
Emergerq,
1983The Last Train Out, 1983
 Backward, Christian Soldiers?, 1984
75 Bible Questions
tiur
Instructors Pray
l’bu
Won’t Ask, 1984 [1988]
Coined Freedom: Gold in the Age of the Bureaucrats, 1984
 Moses and Pharaoh: Dominion Religion
Visus
Power Religion,
1985Negatrends,
198.5
The Sinai
Strate@:
Economics and the
Tm
Commandments, 1986 Conspiracy: A Biblical View, 1986 
Unho~
Spirits: Occultism and New Age Humanism, 1986 
 Honest 
Moruy,
1986 Fighting Chance, 1986 
[with Arthur Robinson]
Dominion
and Common Grace, 1987  Inherit the Earth, 1987 The Pirate Economy, 1987  Liberating Planet Earth, 1987 
 Healer of the Nations, 1987  Is the World Running Down?, 1988
Puritan Economic Experiments, 1988
Trespassing for Dear 
Lye,
1989
When Justice Is Aborted, 1989Tools of Dominion:
The Case Laws of Exodus, 1989The Hoax of Higher Criticism, 1989
The Judeo-Christian Tradition, 1989
Books edited by Gary North
Foundations of Christian Scholarship, 1976 
Tmtics
of Christian Resistance, 1983
The Theology of Christian Resistance, 1983
Editor,
 Journal of Christian Reconstruction (1974-1981)
 
POLITICALPOLYTHEISM
The Myth of Pluralism‘Not by might, not by power, but bymy spirit,
saith
the Lord of 
hosts.~
Zechariah
4:6b
Gary North
Institute for Christian EconomicsTyler, Texas

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