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World Oil Demand

World Oil Demand

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Published by: Ken Connor on Jul 02, 2011
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Congressional Research Service 
 
˜
 
The Library of Congress 
CRS Report for Congress
Received through the CRS Web
Order Code RL32530
World Oil Demand andits Effect on Oil Prices
Updated June 9, 2005
Robert PirogSpecialist in Energy Economics and PolicyResources, Science, and Industry Division
 
World Oil Demand and the Effect on Oil Prices
Summary
The price of oil began rising in October 2003 and reached record levels in 2004and again in 2005. As a result of these price increases, consumers’ budgets havebeen under pressure, business costs have risen, and oil producers’ profits haveincreased. The 109
th
Congress is considering broad energy legislation (H.R. 6), thataddresses conditions in the oil and petroleum products markets.A long term explanatory factor for increasing oil prices could be the decline of the world reserve base. The reserves to production ratio is the measure whichindicates the world’s ability to maintain current production, based on provedreserves. Over the past decade there has been little change in the reserve toproduction ratio, suggesting that, at least for now, long term forces are not driving upthe price of oil.A wide variety of cyclic and short term factors have converged in such a waythat the growth of demand has been unexpectedly high causing upward pressure onoil prices. Those factors which have been identified as contributing to the high priceof oil include the resumption of relatively rapid growth rates of gross domesticproduct in many countries around the world, a declining value of the U.S. dollar,gasoline prices, the changing structure of the oil industry, OPEC policies, and thepersistently low levels of U.S. crude oil and gasoline inventories.Expectations concerning future market conditions are quickly embodied in oilprices formed in futures markets like the New York Mercantile Exchange. The fearof terrorism and war, uncertainty concerning the relationship between the Russiangovernment and the oil company Yukos, and other political factors are quicklyreflected in price along with real political unrest like that experienced by oilproducing Venezuela and Nigeria. Speculative buying and selling might also affectprices as financial traders adjust their investment portfolios to reflect expectedmarket conditions.Demand patterns for world oil and oil products show significant diversity bycountry, region, and product groupings. As a result of this diversity it is not possibleto attach blame for the current level of price to any one nation, region, or productsegment. The view that the oil market is international in scope and tightlyinterrelated is enhanced by the demand data.As a result of the integrated nature of the world oil market it is unlikely that anyone nation acting on its own can implement policies that isolate its market frombroader price behavior. As new major oil importers, notably China, and potentiallyIndia, expand their demand, the oil market likely will have to expand productioncapacity. This promises to increase the world’s dependence on the Persian Gulf members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, especially SaudiArabia, and maintain upward pressure on price.This report will be updated.
 
Contents
Background ......................................................1Oil Prices........................................................2Reserves and Production............................................5Price and Markets.................................................7Economic Growth.............................................8Exchange Rates...............................................9Gasoline Prices...............................................10Industry Structure.............................................11OPEC Policy................................................11Inventories..................................................12Exceptional Events............................................14Sectoral Demand Patterns..........................................15Countries and Regions.........................................16Petroleum Product Demand.....................................17Future Projections................................................18Conclusions.....................................................19
List of Figures
Figure 1. U.S. Spot Price of Oil, 2003-2005............................2Figure 2. U.S. Spot Market Price for Reformulated Regular Gasoline,New York Harbor, 2003-2005....................................4Figure 3. U.S. Crude Oil Stocks Excluding Strategic Petroleum Reserve.....13
List of Tables
Table 1. Oil Reserve/Production Ratios, Selected Years...................6Table 2. World Demand for Oil, 2003................................16

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