Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
7Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct

The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct

Ratings: (0)|Views: 115 |Likes:
The authors begin with an examination of prewar planning for various contingencies, then move to the origins of “Germany first” in American war planning. They then focus on the concept, favored by both George C. Marshall and Dwight D. Eisenhower, that the United States and its Allies had to conduct a cross-channel attack and undertake an offensive aimed at the heartland of Germany. Following this background contained in the initial chapters, the remainder of the book provides a comprehensive discussion outlining how the European Campaign was was carried out. The authors conclude that American political leaders and war planners established logical and achievable objectives for the nation’s military forces. However during the campaign’s execution, American military leaders were slow to put into practice what would later be called operational level warfare. For comparison, the authors include an appendix covering German efforts at war planning in the tumultuous 1920s and 1930s.
The authors begin with an examination of prewar planning for various contingencies, then move to the origins of “Germany first” in American war planning. They then focus on the concept, favored by both George C. Marshall and Dwight D. Eisenhower, that the United States and its Allies had to conduct a cross-channel attack and undertake an offensive aimed at the heartland of Germany. Following this background contained in the initial chapters, the remainder of the book provides a comprehensive discussion outlining how the European Campaign was was carried out. The authors conclude that American political leaders and war planners established logical and achievable objectives for the nation’s military forces. However during the campaign’s execution, American military leaders were slow to put into practice what would later be called operational level warfare. For comparison, the authors include an appendix covering German efforts at war planning in the tumultuous 1920s and 1930s.

More info:

Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/30/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Samuel J. NewlandClayton K.S. Chun
 
The European Campaign:
Its Origins and Conduct
Visit our website for other free publicationdownloadshttp://www.StrategicStudiesInstitute.army.mil/
To rate this publication click here.
 
 About the Cover:The backdrop of the cover is a photographof the 28th Infantry Division on August 29,1944, as they marched down the Avenue desChamps-Élysées, Paris, France, with the Arcde Triomphe de l’Étoile in the background.Their celebration was short, because uponthe conclusion of the parade, they proceededthrough Paris and moved eastward to main-tain contact with the retreating
Wehrmacht
.The inset photograph is of the key leadershipof the European Campaign. It was originally
released by the Ofce of War Information in
1945 and it was captioned: “This is the Brassthat Did It.” The photo was taken at the 12th
Army Group Headquarters, Bad Wildlungen,
Germany, May 11, 1945, three days after theGerman surrender.
Front row left to right, William H. Simpson,George S. Patton Jr., Carl A Spaatz, Dwight
D. Eisenhower, Omar N. Bradley, CourtneyH. Hodges, Leonard T. Gerow. 
Rear row, left to right, Ralph F. Stearley, HoytS. Vandenberg, Walter B. Smith, Otto P Wey
-land, Richard E. Nugent
Source: U.S. Army Military History Institute
 
THE EUROPEAN CAMPAIGN:ITS ORIGINS AND CONDUCTSamuel J. NewlandClayton K. S. Chun June 2011
The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and
do not necessarily reect the ofcial policy or position of the De
-
partment of the Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S.Government. Authors of Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) publica
-tions enjoy full academic freedom, provided they do not disclose
classied information, jeopardize operations security, or mis
-
represent ofcial U.S. policy. Such academic freedom empow
-ers them to offer new and sometimes controversial perspectives
in the interest of furthering debate on key issues. This report iscleared for public release; distribution is unlimited.
*****
This publication is subject to Title 17, United States Code, Sec
-
tions 101 and 105. It is in the public domain and may not becopyrighted.

Activity (7)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
harlan_watson liked this
aturcubb liked this
wakayama liked this
Richard L. Dixon liked this
Angelo liked this
labour97 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->