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Table Of Contents

1.1 About this book
1.2. A brief history of Linux. 3
1.2 A brief history of Linux
1.3 System features
1.4 Software features
1.4.1 Text processing and word processing
1.4.5 Telecommunications and BBS software
1.4.6 World Wide Web
1.4.7 Interfacing and MS-DOS
1.4.8 Other applications
1.5 Copyright issues
1.6. The design and philosophy of Linux. 19
1.6 The design and philosophy of Linux
1.7. Differences between Linux and other operating systems. 21
1.7 Differences between Linux and other operating sys- tems
1.8 Hardware requirements
1.9. Sources of Linux information. 29
1.9 Sources of Linux information
1.9.1 Online documents
1.9.2 Linux on the World Wide Web
1.9.3 Books and other published works
1.9.4 Usenet newsgroups
1.10. Getting Help with Linux. 33
1.9.5 Internet mailing lists
1.10 Getting Help with Linux
Obtaining and Installing Linux
2.1 Generic installation
2.1.1 Major Linux distributions
2.1.2 Common concerns
2.1.3 Hardware
2.1.4 Planning
2.1.5 System planning worksheet
2.1.6 Mice
2.1.7 Considering Hard drives and CD-ROMs
2.1.8 Disk drives under Linux
2.1.9 Installing The X Window System
2.1.10 Networking hardware
2.1.11 Planning, Part 2
2.1.12 Partitioning strategies
2.1.13 The swap partition
2.1.14 Repartitioning
2.1.15 Backing up your old system
2.1.16 FIPS.EXE
2.1.17 Preparing to boot Linux
2.1.18 Creating a Linux boot disk under DOS
2.1.19 Creating a Linux boot disk under Linux
2.1.20 Partitioning the hard disk: fdisk and cfdisk
2.2 Linux distributions
2.3 Debian GNU/Linux
2.3.1 Debian GNU/Linux installation features
2.3.2 Getting floppy images
2.3.3 Downloading the packages
2.3.4 Booting from floppies and installing Debian GNU/Linux
2.3.5 Running Debian GNU/Linux
2.3.6 dselect
2.3.7 dpkg
2.3.8 About Debian GNU/Linux
2.3.9 Mailing lists
2.3.10 Bug tracking system
2.3.11 Debian Acknowledgments
2.3.12 Last note
2.4 Red Hat Linux
2.4.1 Red Hat Linux installation features
2.4.2 The RPM package management system
2.4.3 A note about upgrading Red Hat Linux
2.4.4 Creating the installation floppies
2.4.5 Installation media
2.4.6 Customizing your NFS or hard drive installation
2.4.7 Recommended minimal installation
2.4.8 How much space do you really need?
2.4.9 Installation
2.4.10 Installation media revisited
2.4.11 Walking through the rest of the installation
2.4.12 After installation
2.5 Caldera OpenLinux
2.5.1 Obtaining Caldera OpenLinux
2.5.2 Preparing to install Caldera OpenLinux
2.5.3 Creating boot/modules floppies
2.5.4 Preparing the hard disks
2.6 Slackware
2.6.1 Slackware is not for you. (Or maybe it is.)
2.6.2 A quick history
2.6.3 Why, then?
2.6.4 Upgrade? Think twice!
2.6.5 Select an installation method
2.6.6 Boot disks: always a good thing
2.6.7 Slackware setup worksheet
2.6.8 Making Slackware happen
2.6.9 Build some boot disks
2.6.10 Boot into action
2.6.11 The Slackware setup program
2.6.12 Is that all?
2.6.13 Troubleshooting difficult deliveries
2.6.14 Basking in the afterglow
2.6.15 Consider reinstalling!
2.6.16 Secure the system
2.7 S.u.S.E
2.7.1 Beginning the installation
2.7.2 S.u.S.E Post-installation
2.7.3 Getting X up and running
2.7.4 Later upgrades
2.8 Post-installation procedures
2.9 Running into trouble
2.9.1 Problems with booting the installation media
2.9.2 Hardware problems
2.9.3 Problems installing the software
2.9.4 Problems after installing Linux
Linux Tutorial
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Basic Linux concepts
3.2.1 Creating an account
3.2.2 Logging in
3.2.3 Virtual consoles
3.2.4 Shells and commands
3.2.5 Logging out
3.2.6 Changing your password
3.2.7 Files and directories
3.2.8 The directory tree
3.2.9 The current working directory
3.2.10 Referring to home directories
3.3 First steps into Linux
3.3.1 Moving around
3.4 Accessing MS-DOS files
3.5 Summary of basic UNIX commands
3.6 Exploring the file system
3.7 Types of shells
3.8 Wildcards
3.9 Linux plumbing
3.9.1 Standard input and standard output
3.9.2 Redirecting input and output
3.9.3 Using pipes
3.9.4 Non-destructive redirection of output
3.10 File permissions
3.10.1 Concepts of file permissions
3.10.2 Interpreting file permissions
3.10.3 Permissions Dependencies
3.10.4 Changing permissions
3.11 Managing file links
3.11.1 Hard links
3.11.2 Symbolic links
3.12 Job control
3.12.1 Jobs and processes
3.12.2 Foreground and background
3.12.3 Backgrounding and killing jobs
3.12.4 Stopping and restarting jobs
3.13 Using the vi editor
3.13.1 Concepts
3.13.2 Starting vi
3.13.3 Inserting text
3.13.4 Deleting text
3.13.5 Changing text
3.14.2 Shell variables and the environment
3.14.3 Shell initialization scripts
3.15 So you want to strike out on your own?
System Administration
4.1 The root account
4.2 Booting the system
4.2.1 Using LILO
4.3 Shutting down
4.3.1 The /etc/inittabfile
4.4 Managing file systems
4.4.1 Mounting file systems
4.4.2 Device driver names
4.4.3 Checking file systems
4.5 Using a swap file
4.6 Managing users
4.6.1 User management concepts
4.6.2 Adding users
4.6.3 Deleting users
4.6.4 Setting user attributes
4.6.5 Groups
4.6.6 System administration responsibilities
4.6.7 Coping with users
4.6.8 Setting the rules
4.6.9 What it all means
4.7 Archiving and compressing files
4.7.1 Using tar
4.7.2 gzip and compress
4.7.3 Putting them together
4.8. Using floppies and making backups. 211
4.8 Using floppies and making backups
4.8.1 Using floppies for backups
4.8.2 Backups with a Zip drive
4.8.3 Making backups to tape devices
4.8.4 Using floppies as file systems
4.9 Upgrading and installing new software
4.9.1 Upgrading the kernel
4.9.2 Adding a device driver to the kernel
4.9.3 Installing a device driver module
4.9.4 Upgrading the libraries
4.9.5 Upgrading gcc
4.9.6 Upgrading other software
4.10 Miscellaneous tasks
4.10.1 System startup files
4.10.2 Setting the host name
4.11 What to do in an emergency
4.11.1 Recovery with a maintenance diskette
4.11.2 Fixing the root password
4.11.3 Trashed file systems
4.11.4 Recovering lost files
4.11.5 Trashed libraries
The X Window System
5.1 X Window Hardware requirements
5.1.1 Video display
5.1.2 Memory, CPU, and disk space
5.2 XFree86 installation
5.5 Configuring XFree86
5.6 Filling in video card information
5.7 Running XFree86
5.8 When you run into trouble
Networking
6.1 Networking with TCP/IP
6.1.1 Configuring TCP/IP on your system
6.1.2 SLIP configuration
6.2 Dial-up networking and PPP
6.2.1 What you need to get started
6.2.2 An overview of the steps involved
6.2.3 Creating the connection scripts
6.2.4 Editing the supplied PPP startup scripts
6.2.5 Starting PPP at the server end
6.2.6 If your PPP server uses PAP (Password Authentication Proto- col)
6.2.7 Using MSCHAP
6.2.8 Shutting down the PPP link
6.2.9 Troubleshooting common problems once the link is working
6.3 Networking with UUCP
6.4 Networking with Microsoft Systems
6.5 Electronic mail
6.6 News and Usenet
Sources of Linux Information
FTP Tutorial and Site List
The GNU General Public License
GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
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13 Linux Instalaresioperare

13 Linux Instalaresioperare

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Published by Pavel Irinel-Adrian

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Published by: Pavel Irinel-Adrian on Jul 12, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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