Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
WRITING STORIES - A timeless image in a dream

WRITING STORIES - A timeless image in a dream

Ratings: (0)|Views: 77 |Likes:
Published by Gregory Rhoades
Have you ever wanted to write but didn't know where to begin? This paper is a tool to help you analyze your story. This is the homework a writer needs to do before he can begin. A lot of writers don't like to do the research needed in order to get down to business. In Writing Stories you will find a 16 page guideline that will help you quickly to get to work on what it is you need to understand before you can begin to write. Even if you only understood a few elements within this text and applied you you'd be well on your way to writing a story within a few days.
Have you ever wanted to write but didn't know where to begin? This paper is a tool to help you analyze your story. This is the homework a writer needs to do before he can begin. A lot of writers don't like to do the research needed in order to get down to business. In Writing Stories you will find a 16 page guideline that will help you quickly to get to work on what it is you need to understand before you can begin to write. Even if you only understood a few elements within this text and applied you you'd be well on your way to writing a story within a few days.

More info:

Published by: Gregory Rhoades on Jul 12, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/12/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Writing Stories Avtar JiAvtar Ji www.InnerLiving.info
The Writer’s Journey
By Christopher Vogler 
•Normal life: How do we get to know this character?•The Call: Set the story inmotion, get the ball rolling.•Denial: The hero has doubts.•Meet the Wise One: Thehero learns the inside story.•Full Commitment: The herodecides to take a chance.•Friends & Enemies: Conflicts•Inside the Enemy’s castle: Thebattle of life and death.•Escape with the ‘Key”: Smallvictory / the hero runs away.•The Climax: The Final Battle!
S t o r i e s
WRITING A STORY
A story begins the first moment you capture the human heart. Memorablestories are about IMAGES
, TIMELESS IMAGES IN A DREAM
, not justwords, but images that touch our heart, that touch the humanity within us. Whatdoes our heart want and feel? From what new vantage point do we view theworld? How do we illuminate the everyday experience of our normal world togain new insight into our lives? What is at the meaning of our life’s experience?
 
FICTION
: A story exists as an imaginary world, one that we are taken into by our own mind through the vehicle of a
hero
. The hero is the heart of the story.We enter this imaginary world to experience it vicariously through her,and hope that by understanding her world, which is created within our minds eye,we just might experience what that character experiences and for a while seewith her eyes and discover a new world with new insights into our own.“There is nothing in a play but the
CHARACTERS
, every word that isuttered is uttered by a character. A play is an arrangement of words spoken bythe characters to tell a story. Therefore, a play is nothing more than a character'saction.”
SIMON CALLOW, English Actor 
You begin with people, within them, and travel into their world behindtheir eyes, and within their 
hearts
. Welcome to the world within.
 
 A TIMELESS IMAGE IN A DREAM
 
Writing Stories Avtar JiAvtar Ji www.InnerLiving.info
THEME
:
The ‘
theme’
of a story is the main ideawhich runs through the entire story and unifies itas a whole. Theme is what the story is about. Notthe hero’s action, but the
idea
behind the story.Theme is what the story is saying about humanity.It’s a comment on the human condition in aspecific situation. The theme is definitely a strongopinion or a very specific point of view.Say for example your content or idea is about sex.You can approach sex from several different pointsof view: control, love, romance, emptiness, fear,connection. All of these ways of approaching sexchanges our idea about sex. We are either sayingit’s a good or bad thing, or we can take a neutralstance and just lay it out there. Sex happens.To produce a mighty book or story you must produce a mighty
theme.
A theme gives us aninsight into life. We bring this insight to life, inour emotions, in our actions, to our senses, not justto our intellect. Do not ask what does my storyteach -- but, “What does the story reveal?”
 
The Seven Elements of Character
1.
Self Concept (Relationship Roles)
2.
Main Motivations (Needs / Wants)
3.
 Action (actions of speech)
4.
Points of View (Roles)
5.
 Attitudes
6.
Dramatic Changes (Inner & Outer)
7.
Differences
The core of the character lies in his motives, hisself-concept, and his strong points of view and attitudes.By contrasting them with other character’s motives, self-concepts, and points of view, and by showing thosedifferences in ‘action’, you create conflict. You defineyour character and the drama begins to unfold. Drama isconflict. Conflict makes your story interesting.
Examples:
Hamlet believed he could challenge the king, while everyone else feared the king.Othello believed in perfect love, buteveryone else believed that love was flawed.
 
CONFLICT
When the Hero’s points of view is at odds with the popular concepts of thosein his environment, with those of the modern day, with authority, those in power,then you have
drama
. The hero is alone, facing great odds for what she believesdeeply. Now that is interesting.
I.
CONFLICT ORIGINATES WITHIN THE CHARACTER:
The audience roots for the character’s
 struggle
-- for what she
wants
. There is a chance of her failure.We empathize with the struggle through what she ‘feels’. We want to see her succeed and get what she wants.So always keep the audience wanting more; don’t give her what she wants until the end because the audiencecares about people that stand up and fight for what they want. If we give her what she wants in the beginningthere would be no story. Nobody watches the village of happy nice people and the girl who gets the man of her dreams with no struggle. If 
character 
is the
heart 
of the story,
conflict 
is the
pulse
.
 
Writing Stories Avtar JiAvtar Ji www.InnerLiving.info
 Where does Conflict originate?
 
Social - Friends, relatives, lovers, coworkers etc.
Emotional - Love, hate, fear, joy, laughter, greed
Racial
Religious
Monetary
Spiritual
Moral Problemsare posed by fate, theworld or society,natural disaster, life circumstance, other people, anddon’t forget our own inner faults. We either find a wayto succeed or we fail. Failure is tragic; success isheroic. Seek the maximum effect of conflict which islife or death stakes. Raise the stakes. Shorten the timelimits to achieve goals. Basically increase the
 Drama
.
Ask questions:
What does the hero want? (Specifically) Whatis she willing to fight for? Why is it vital to her happiness? Who stands in her way?
Fill in the blank 
: They all thought it was disgracefuland upsetting to find out that I __________________.For example: ( that I took the job with the travelingcircus and married an outlaw vampire.)One way to define a character is by opposingher to other’s negative points of view. This shows thatshe is independent of other’s points of view and givesher a clear and definite reason for leaving her old life behind. No one supported her -- so she left town.While opposition may be wide spread in a largegroup, the major source of opposition should only berepresented by just one person. One person’s opinionrepresents the entire organization’s opinion. So thatwhen their point of view directly opposes the hero’sideas, it means the entire group is opposed to the hero.
SELF CONCEPT
First, match the Hero’s
 self-concept 
with her ‘needs’and ‘wants’. Keep these in mind when you flesh outher 
SELF CONCEPT 
. Self Concept is composed of three things:
1.
Self Concept: Who we believe we are.
2.
Self Esteem: The judgments we pass on ourself.
3.
Values: What we want, and what we don’t.
1. SELF CONCEPT
– Who do they believe they are,what is their self-concept? I am a man of action, I ama woman of my word, I keep my promises, I am asensualist, I am a surrealist, I am a king, I am a loser.We constantly look for evidence to prove to ourselvesthat we are what we think, and if we don’t find any, wecreate situations and self generate this evidence.
2. Self Esteem
– Are we worthy of love, are wecapable to achieve our goals? Self esteem, like self image are self fulfilling prophecies. They determinewhether or not we get what we want.
 If I feel like I will never get what I want, then I probably won’t.
The judgments we pass on ourselves are the hardest.
3. Values
- Our life is a non-stop pursuit of values.We seek that which we love. We avoid that which wehate. In life this is automatic, but in art we must re-create this process by identifying what it is that our hero loves most of all.Our ‘self concept’ is defined by what we
value
’.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->