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Visual C# .NET Programming

Visual C# .NET Programming

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Visual C# .NET Programming
Harold Davis Associate Publisher: Richard Mills Acquisitions Editor: Denise Santoro Lincoln Developmental Editor: Tom Cirtin Editor: Pete Gaughan Production Editor: Mae Lum Technical Editor: Matt Tagliaferri Electronic Publishing Specialists: Rozi Harris, Bill Clark, Interactive Composition Corporation Proofreaders: Amey Garber, Nelson Kim, David Nash, Laurie O'Connell, Yariv Rabinovitch, Nancy Riddiough Indexer: Lynnzee Elze Cover Designer: Caryl Gorska, Gorska Design
Visual C# .NET Programming
Harold Davis Associate Publisher: Richard Mills Acquisitions Editor: Denise Santoro Lincoln Developmental Editor: Tom Cirtin Editor: Pete Gaughan Production Editor: Mae Lum Technical Editor: Matt Tagliaferri Electronic Publishing Specialists: Rozi Harris, Bill Clark, Interactive Composition Corporation Proofreaders: Amey Garber, Nelson Kim, David Nash, Laurie O'Connell, Yariv Rabinovitch, Nancy Riddiough Indexer: Lynnzee Elze Cover Designer: Caryl Gorska, Gorska Design

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Visual C# .NET Programming
Harold Davis
 Associate Publisher: Richard MillsAcquisitions Editor: Denise Santoro LincolnDevelopmental Editor: Tom CirtinEditor: Pete GaughanProduction Editor: Mae LumTechnical Editor: Matt TagliaferriElectronic Publishing Specialists: Rozi Harris, Bill Clark, Interactive CompositionCorporationProofreaders: Amey Garber, Nelson Kim, David Nash, Laurie O'Connell, Yariv Rabinovitch, Nancy RiddioughIndexer: Lynnzee ElzeCover Designer: Caryl Gorska, Gorska DesignCover Photographer: Carlog Navajas, Image Bank Copyright © 2002 Harold DavisWorld rights reserved. No part of this publication may be stored in a retrieval system,transmitted, or reproduced in any way, including but not limited to photocopy, photograph,magnetic, or other record, without the prior agreement and written permission of the publisher.Figures 2.1,2.2,8.4,10.6, and12.16Copyright © 2002, Phyllis Davis. All rights reserved. Library of Congress Card Number: 2002106412ISBN: 0-7821-4046-7SYBEX and the SYBEX logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of SYBEX Inc.in the United States and/or other countries.Screen reproductions produced with FullShot 99. FullShot 99 © 1991-1999 InbitIncorporated. All rights reserved FullShot is a trademark of Inbit Incorporated.Internet screen shot(s) using Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 reprinted by permission fromMicrosoft Corporation.Microsoft, the Microsoft Internet Explorer logo, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windowslogo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the UnitedStates and/or other countries.TRADEMARKS: SYBEX has attempted throughout this book to distinguish proprietarytrademarks from descriptive terms by following the capitalization style used by themanufacturer.The author and publisher have made their best efforts to prepare this book, and the content is based upon final release software whenever possible. Portions of the manuscript may be based
 
upon pre-release versions supplied by software manufacturer(s). The author and the publisher make no representation or warranties of any kind with regard to the completeness or accuracyof the contents herein and accept no liability of any kind including but not limited to performance, merchantability, fitness for any particular purpose, or any losses or damages of any kind caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly from this book.Manufactured in the United States of America10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1For Phyllis, who makes the music in my life
Acknowledgments
 When the music stops, an author alone is responsible for the book he or she has created. Thatsaid, a book such as this is produced through the efforts of many people. Richard Mills andDenise Santoro Lincoln originated this project and brought me into it. Tom Cirtin did a great job of helping to birth this book, and contributed from his vast store of musical knowledge.Mae Lum masterfully handled the logistics as the book became a full-fledged project. PeteGaughan copyedited this book and has substantially helped to make it something we can all be proud of. Matt Tagliaferri provided technical review and helped save me from myself.In addition to team Sybex, I would like to thank my friend and agent, Matt Wagner, and BillGladstone, both of Waterside Productions.I am thankful to Phyllis Davis, who contributed beyond the call of duty in a number of ways,and to Martin Davis, who read several chapters in 'manuscript,' as they quaintly say, and mademany useful suggestions. And thanks to Chris Hopper, who helped with hardware.Last, but not least, a standing ovation for Anders Hejlsberg and Scott Wiltamuth, withoutwhom there would be no C# to write about.
The quotation on the bottom of the front cover is taken from the thirty-fifth chapter of LaoTzu'sTao Te Ching, the classic work of Taoist philosophy. This particular verse is from thetranslation byD. C. Lau (copyright 1963) and communicates a theme explored throughout thebook: true knowledge transcends the ordinary senses.
 
 It is traditionally held that Lao Tzu lived in the fifth century B.C. in China, during the Choudynasty, but it is unclear whether he was actually a historical figure. It is said that he was ateacher of Confucius. The concepts embodied in the Tao Te Ching influenced religiousthinking in the Far East, including Zen Buddhism in Japan. Many in the West, however, havewrongly understood theTao Te Ching to be primarily a mystical work; in fact, much of theadvice in the book is grounded in a practical moral philosophy governing personal conduct.
Introduction
I dreamed that black-clad horsemen pursued me down a lonely road. The hoofs of their steedsrang with urgent clanks on the paving stones. I turned to look at my pursuers and saw fieryred-rimmed eyes fixed within deathly pale faces. A sword was raised, and as it swept down…
 
 No, that's not the way it goes at all.I dreamed of a city far in the future. Sentient machines performed all menial labor, so therewas plenty of time for science and art. But all was not well in paradise. Regimentation begatalienation, and alienation begat a class of cyber-hackers who had dropped out of knownsociety and lived in caves far from the city.That's a little closer, but we're not quite there yet! Let's try again.I dreamed of a pure programming language, so sweet and tender, yet flexible and strong. Thislanguage, named after a musical note, incorporated the best features of other languages andalso made available an extremely potent library of classes. You guessed it: the language is C#,and the library of classes the .NET Framework. This dream is true!This is a different kind of book about a programming language. The conventional thing is to begin with syntax and semantics, proceed through user interfaces and object orientation, andend with various applications. But why be conventional? This book does not do the standardthing.To some degree, a book is a compact between writer and reader. The reader will rightly bedisappointed if what they expected to find is missing. At the same time, no book can beeverything for everybody.In this sense, the compact between writer and reader is analogous to the implementation of aninterface in a class. Everything is spelled out in the interface, so that there is nomisunderstanding about how to use an implementation of it.I expect readers of this book to have some experience with programming, or at least be highlyintelligent. This is not a book for dummies. (Or, as Mel Brooks exhorted in a differentcontext, 'Be a smarty!')However, your programming experience need not be with a language in the 'C' family-or evenwith Java. C# represents a wonderful 'next step' for Visual Basic programmers. If you are aVB programmer looking for new horizons, this book was written for you.By the way, the one area that seems to trip VB programmers new to C# is type conversion. Soif you are a VB programmer new to C#, you might want to start with a look at the materialexplaining type conversion inChapter 6, 'Zen and Now: The C# Language.' I do not promise to be comprehensive or encyclopedic in my coverage of C# or the .NETFramework. For one thing, no single book could ever keep this promise, as the field is so vast.For another, online help is the best place for detailed answers to many questions-so, asappropriate in this book, I refer you to help topics.Internal tools such as the Object Browser reveal more information than any documentationcould-I show you how to make the best use of the Object Browser inChapter 5, 'Reflecting on Classes.'

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