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Framework for Story-Based Consulting

Framework for Story-Based Consulting

Ratings: (0)|Views: 179 |Likes:
Published by Terrence Gargiulo
This paper provides a detailed analysis of nine functions of stories and their unique effects. Originally derived in 1992 this framework guides all of MAKINGSTORIES.net’s consulting work. This paper is shared in response to people’s request to understand how I craft interventions. It is not intended to be a “How to,” piece. Links to complimentary and fee based resources/guides/tools are offered at the end of this paper.

Stories are fundamental to the way we communicate, learn and think.

Stories are the most efficient way of storing, retrieving, and conveying information. Since story hearing requires active participation on the part of the listener, stories are the most profoundly social form of human interaction communication, and learning.

Telling stories for any organizational purpose only scratches the surface. We are interested in using stories as powerful vehicles for eliciting each others’ experiences and knowledge, listening to each other and ourselves in deeper ways, and providing our imaginations with a canvas for reflection and learning.
This paper provides a detailed analysis of nine functions of stories and their unique effects. Originally derived in 1992 this framework guides all of MAKINGSTORIES.net’s consulting work. This paper is shared in response to people’s request to understand how I craft interventions. It is not intended to be a “How to,” piece. Links to complimentary and fee based resources/guides/tools are offered at the end of this paper.

Stories are fundamental to the way we communicate, learn and think.

Stories are the most efficient way of storing, retrieving, and conveying information. Since story hearing requires active participation on the part of the listener, stories are the most profoundly social form of human interaction communication, and learning.

Telling stories for any organizational purpose only scratches the surface. We are interested in using stories as powerful vehicles for eliciting each others’ experiences and knowledge, listening to each other and ourselves in deeper ways, and providing our imaginations with a canvas for reflection and learning.

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Categories:Business/Law
Published by: Terrence Gargiulo on Jul 18, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/12/2014

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original

 
 
FRAMEWORK
 
FOR
 
STORY
BASED
 
CONSULTING
 
(change
 
management,
 
learning,
 
communication,
 
employee
 
engagement,
 
strategy,
 
corporate
 
values)
 
by
 
Terrence
 
L.
 
Gargiulo
 
President,
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net
 
This
 
 paper 
 
 provides
 
a
 
detailed 
 
analysis
 
of 
 
nine
 
 functions
 
of 
 
stories
 
and 
 
their 
 
unique
 
effects.
 
Originally 
 
derived 
 
in
 
1992
 
this
 
 framework 
 
guides
 
all 
 
of 
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net’s
 
consulting
 
work.
 
This
 
 paper 
 
is
 
shared 
 
in
 
response
 
to
 
 people’s
 
request 
 
to
 
understand 
 
how 
 
I
 
craft 
 
interventions.
 
It 
 
is
 
not 
 
intended 
 
to
 
be
 
a
 
“How 
 
to,” 
 
 piece.
 
Links
 
to
 
complimentary 
 
and 
 
 fee
 
based 
 
resources/guides/tools
 
are
 
offered 
 
at 
 
the
 
end 
 
of 
 
this
 
 paper.
 
Stories
 
are
 
 fundamental 
 
to
 
the
 
way 
 
we
 
communicate,
 
learn
 
and 
 
think.
 
Stories
 
are
 
the
 
most
 
efficient
 
way
 
of 
 
storing,
 
retrieving,
 
and
 
conveying
 
information.
 
Since
 
story
 
hearing
 
requires
 
active
 
participation
 
on
 
the
 
part
 
of 
 
the
 
listener,
 
stories
 
are
 
the
 
most
 
profoundly
 
social
 
form
 
of 
 
human
 
interaction
 
communication,
 
and
 
learning.
 
Telling
 
stories
 
for
 
any
 
organizational
 
purpose
 
only
 
scratches
 
the
 
surface.
 
We
 
are
 
interested
 
in
 
using
 
stories
 
as
 
powerful
 
vehicles
 
for
 
eliciting
 
each
 
others’
 
experiences
 
and
 
knowledge,
 
listening
 
to
 
each
 
other
 
and
 
ourselves
 
in
 
deeper
 
ways,
 
and
 
providing
 
our
 
imaginations
 
with
 
a
 
canvas
 
for
 
reflection
 
and
 
learning.
 
Stories
 
surround
 
us.
 
Everywhere
 
we
 
turn
 
there
 
is
 
a
 
story
 
vying
 
for
 
our
 
attention.
 
It’s
 
not
 
 just
 
newspapers
 
or
 
television
 
programs
 
either.
 
Do
 
you
 
ever
 
find
 
yourself 
 
in
 
the
 
uncomfortable
 
position
 
of 
 
having
 
nothing
 
to
 
say
 
in
 
the
 
midst
 
of 
 
a
 
conversation,
 
but
 
suddenly
 
the
 
memory
 
of 
 
a
 
past
 
experience
 
you
 
can
 
share
 
rushes
 
in
 
to
 
fill
 
an
 
otherwise
 
awkward
 
void?
 
Or
 
when
 
you
 
are
 
listening
 
to
 
someone
 
else,
 
do
 
you
 
notice
 
any
 
change
 
in
 
the
 
quality
 
of 
 
your
 
attention
 
and
 
level
 
of 
 
interest
 
when
 
they
 
begin
 
to
 
vividly
 
recount
 
a
 
past
 
experience
 
and
 
cease
 
speaking
 
in
 
abstractions?
 
The
 
most
 
meaningful
 
conversations
 
are
 
full
 
of 
 
memorable
 
stories.
 
 
Page | 2
There
 
are
 
many
 
labels
 
you
 
might
 
choose
 
for
 
this
 
unique
 
form
 
of 
 
communication.
 
Take
 
a
 
moment
 
and
 
 jot
 
down
 
any
 
words
 
or
 
descriptions
 
that
 
come
 
to
 
mind:
 
Here
 
are
 
some
 
potential
 
candidates:
 
 
Anecdote
 
 
Conversation
 
 
Experience
 
 
“Once
 
upon
 
a
 
time…”
 
 
Memory
 
 
Tale
 
 
Recollection
 
 
Image
 
 
Myth
 
 
Parable
 
 
Metaphor
 
 
Fib
 
 
Analogy
 
 
Illustration
 
 
Cliché
 
 
Allegory
 
 
Word
 
Picture
 
 
Narrative
 
 
Joke
 
 
Snapshot
 
 
Picture
 
Let’s
 
gather
 
all
 
such
 
ways
 
of 
 
conversing
 
under
 
the
 
umbrella
 
of 
 
“story
 
telling.”
 
That
 
way
 
we
 
can
 
draw
 
upon
 
the
 
rich
 
and
 
varied
 
understanding
 
you
 
already
 
likely
 
have,
 
at
 
some
 
level,
 
about
 
what
 
constitutes
 
a
 
story.
 
The
 
functions
 
of 
 
stories
 
and
 
their
 
unique
 
effects
 
offer
 
us
 
insights
 
into
 
the
 
nature
 
and
 
dynamics
 
of 
 
communication
 
and
 
learning.
 
There
 
is
 
no
 
reason
 
for
 
us
 
to
 
restrict
 
what
 
we
 
accept
 
as
 
stories
 
or
 
to
 
try
 
and
 
reduce
 
them
 
down
 
to
 
a
 
single
 
definition.
 
Unlike
 
many
 
trend
 
setting
 
management
 
theorists,
 
I
 
am
 
not
 
trying
 
to
 
manufacture
 
something
 
new.
 
I
 
am
 
acting
 
as
 
an
 
observer
 
of 
 
and
 
as
 
a
 
guide
 
to
 
a
 
communication
 
paradigm
 
that
 
is
 
already
 
so
 
much
 
a
 
part
 
of 
 
how
 
we
 
communicate
 
and
 
learn
 
that
 
we
 
have
 
lost
 
sight
 
of 
 
it.
 
I
 
am
 
seeking
 
to
 
invigorate
 
an
 
innate
 
capacity
 
and
 
promote
 
its
 
conscious
 
usage
 
and
 
cultivation
 
in
 
business
 
and
 
in
 
all
 
that
 
we
 
do.
 
 
Page | 3
While
 
we
 
should
 
be
 
wary
 
of 
 
too
 
narrowly
 
defining
 
stories
 
and
 
story
 
telling,
 
it
 
is
 
useful
 
to
 
set
 
forth
 
a
 
framework
 
for
 
our
 
inquiries
 
and
 
some
 
ground
 
rules
 
we
 
will
 
follow.
 
Stories
 
are
 
used
 
to:
 
Stories
 
have
 
the
 
following
 
effects:
 
1.
 
Empower
 
a
 
speaker
 
2.
 
Create
 
an
 
environment
 
3.
 
Bind
 
and
 
bond
 
individuals
 
Entertain
 
Create
 
trust
 
and
 
openness
 
between
 
yourself 
 
and
 
others
 
Elicit
 
stories
 
from
 
others
 
4.
 
Engage
 
our
 
minds
 
in
 
active
 
listening
 
5.
 
Negotiate
 
differences
 
Listen
 
actively
 
in
 
order
 
to:
 
Understand 
 
context 
 
and 
 
 perspective
 
Identify 
 
the
 
root 
 
cause
 
of 
 
a
 
 problem
 
Uncover 
 
resistance
 
and 
 
hidden
 
agendas
 
Shift
 
perspectives
 
in
 
order
 
to:
 
See
 
each
 
other 
 
Experience
 
empathy 
 
Enter 
 
new 
 
 frames
 
of 
 
reference
 
Hold
 
diverse
 
points
 
of 
 
view
 
Become
 
aware
 
of 
 
operating
 
biases
 
and
 
values
 
6.
 
Encode
 
information
 
7.
 
Act
 
as
 
tools
 
for
 
thinking
 
8.
 
Serve
 
as
 
weapons
 
9.
 
Serve
 
as
 
healing
 
agents
 
Create
 
a
 
working
 
metaphor
 
to
 
illuminate
 
an
 
opinion,
 
rationale,
 
vision,
 
or
 
decision.
 
Establish
 
connections
 
between
 
different
 
ideas
 
and
 
concepts
 
to
 
support
 
an
 
opinion
 
or
 
decision
 
Think
 
outside
 
the
 
box
 
to
 
generate
 
creative
 
solutions
 
and
 
breakthroughs.
 
In
 
1992,
 
Professor 
 
Luis
 
Ygelsisas
 
and 
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo
 
did 
 
an
 
in
 
depth
 
analysis
 
of 
 
a
 
story 
 
titled.
 
The
 
Man
 
Without 
 
a
 
Story.
 
These
 
 functions
 
and 
 
effects
 
come
 
 from
 
that 
 
work.
 
Send 
 
me
 
an
 
email 
 
and 
 
I’ll 
 
share
 
a
 
copy 
 
of 
 
the
 
story 
 
– 
 
terrence@makingstories.net .
 

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