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NASA-USAF SPACECOM-BOEING SVS Directed Energy US Military Space Weapons Platform

NASA-USAF SPACECOM-BOEING SVS Directed Energy US Military Space Weapons Platform

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Published by A.J. MacDonald, Jr.
Inertially Stabilized Platforms for Precision Pointing Applications to directed-energy weapons and space-based lasers. Tactical and space-based high-energy-laser weapon systems present interesting challenges for precision line-of-sight control. Subpointing accuracies are required against dynamic targets. In addition, absolute pointing and inertial angular-rate measurements are required to support mission requirements. This article addresses directed-energy-weapon (DEW) precision pointing requirements and implementation alternatives in the context of strapdown and stable-platform inertial-reference technologies. Prior work has addressed details of stable platform design and test results. The contributions of the present article include the broader issues of DEW requirements drivers, integration of the stabilization system with the remaining optical system, and design tradeoffs between stable-platform and strapdown stabilization mechanizations.
Inertially Stabilized Platforms for Precision Pointing Applications to directed-energy weapons and space-based lasers. Tactical and space-based high-energy-laser weapon systems present interesting challenges for precision line-of-sight control. Subpointing accuracies are required against dynamic targets. In addition, absolute pointing and inertial angular-rate measurements are required to support mission requirements. This article addresses directed-energy-weapon (DEW) precision pointing requirements and implementation alternatives in the context of strapdown and stable-platform inertial-reference technologies. Prior work has addressed details of stable platform design and test results. The contributions of the present article include the broader issues of DEW requirements drivers, integration of the stabilization system with the remaining optical system, and design tradeoffs between stable-platform and strapdown stabilization mechanizations.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: A.J. MacDonald, Jr. on Jul 25, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/09/2013

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2006
4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE
Inertially Stabilized Platforms for Precision Pointing
 
5a. CONTRACT NUMBER
Applications to directed-energy weapons and space-based lasers (PREPRINT)
 
5b. GRANT NUMBER5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER6. AUTHOR(S)
J. Negro, S. Griffin
5d. PROJECT NUMBER5e. TASK NUMBER5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER
 
7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORTNUMBER
Boeing-SVS Inc4411 The 25 Way NEAlbuquerque, NM 87109
9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES)10. SPONSOR/MONITORS ACRONYM(S)
AFRL/VSSV Air Force Research LaboratorySpace Vehicles Directorate
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Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 AFRL-VS-PS-JA-2006-1017
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 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. (Clearance #VS06-0383)
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Submitted for publication in the IEEE MagazineGovernment Purpose Rights
14. ABSTRACT
Tactical and space-based high-energy-laser weapon systems present interesting challenges for precision line-of-sight control.Sub-µrad
  
 pointing accuracies are required against dynamic targets. In addition, absolute pointing and inertial angular-ratemeasurements are required to support mission requirements. This article addresses directed-energy-weapon (DEW) precision pointing requirements and implementation alternatives in the context of strapdown and stable-platform inertial-referencetechnologies. Prior work has addressed details of stable platform design and test results. The contributions of the presentarticle include the broader issues of DEW requirements drivers, integration of the stabilization system with the remainingoptical system, and design tradeoffs between stable-platform and strapdown stabilization mechanizations.
15. SUBJECT TERMS
DEW, Precision Pointing, Stabilized Platforms, Directed Energy Weapon, Strapdown
16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATIONOF ABSTRACT18. NUMBEROF PAGES19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Benjamin K Henderson
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Inertially Stabilized Platforms for Precision Pointing
Applications to directed-energy weapons and space-based lasers
J. Negro and S. GriffinTactical and space-based high-energy-laser weapon systems present interestingchallenges for precision line-of-sight control. Sub-
rad
  
 pointing accuracies are required againstdynamic targets. In addition, absolute pointing and inertial angular-rate measurements arerequired to support mission requirements. This article addresses directed-energy-weapon (DEW) precision pointing requirements and implementation alternatives in the context of strapdown andstable-platform inertial-reference technologies. Prior work [1] has addressed details of stable platform design and test results. The contributions of the present article include the broader issues of DEW requirements drivers, integration of the stabilization system with the remainingoptical system, and design tradeoffs between stable-platform and strapdown stabilizationmechanizations. – 1 – 
 
 Gyro-stabilized pointing controls have been implemented for over 60 years. The earliestapplications provided lead compensation for anti-aircraft guns. Most gyro-stabilized platformapplications are for inertial navigation systems in which gyros provide measurements to maintainan accurate orientation knowledge of an accelerometer triad, as required for accurate navigationsolutions. Another application includes gyro-stabilized gimbal pointing systems, used for camera or electro-optical sensor-imaging applications.With the advent of lasers in 1959, the need arose to precisely point these devices. Laser  pointing and tracking-system development occurred rapidly in the 1970s with the production of ground-based, sea-based, and airborne DEW pointing systems under programs sponsored by theAir Force Weapons Laboratory (now the Air Force Research Laboratory) and the Navy SeaSystems Command – PMS 405. The early systems, designed and built by the Hughes AircraftCompany, were based on an approach in which telescopes were mounted on gimbals andstabilized using gyros mounted directly to the telescope. This approach is called an “on-gimbalstabilized telescope” approach. By the mid 1970s larger telescope apertures were of interest and by the early 1980s the prospect of viable space-based laser systems provided a key impetus to theformation of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, now known as the Missile DefenseAgency (MDA). Basing lasers in space, despite issues associated with deploying sophisticatedhardware, has the advantages of negligible degradation of laser propagation due to theatmosphere as well as fewer limitations on the deployment of large optics that enhance capabilityat long ranges. – 2 – 

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