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Vancouver Separated Bike Lane

Vancouver Separated Bike Lane

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Published by gingerbeer1
To support the goals of the City of Vancouver‟s present long-term transportation plan (adopted in 1997) to
increase cycling mode share, two separated two-way bike lanes trials were constructed in Vancouver‟s
downtown core in 2010.
To support the goals of the City of Vancouver‟s present long-term transportation plan (adopted in 1997) to
increase cycling mode share, two separated two-way bike lanes trials were constructed in Vancouver‟s
downtown core in 2010.

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Published by: gingerbeer1 on Jul 25, 2011
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11/11/2012

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VANCOUVER SEPARATED BIKE LANE BUSINESS IMPACT STUDY
JULY 20, 2011
Vancouver Separated Bike LaneBusiness Impact Study
Prepared for:Vancouver Economic Development CommissionCity of Vancouver Downtown Vancouver AssociationDowntown Vancouver Business Improvement AssociationThe Vancouver Board of TradePrepared By:Stantec Consulting Ltd. withSite Economics andMustel Group Market Research
 
VANCOUVER SEPARATED BIKE LANE BUSINESS IMPACT STUDY
JULY 20, 2011i
Executive Summary
Introduction
To support the goals of the City of Vanc
ouver‟
s present long-term transportation plan (adopted in 1997) toincrease cycling mode share, two separated two-way bike lanes trials were constructed in Vanco
uver‟
sdowntown core in 2010. The first, completed in June 2010, was built along the north side of Dunsmuir St.from the Dunsmuir Viaduct to Hornby St. The second was completed in December 2010 and was builtalong the length of the east side of Hornby St., as well as on short sections of Drake, Burrard, and WestHastings Streets. To implement the separated bike lanes, road space was reallocated, parking spaceswere moved or eliminated, the illegal use of some loading zones was eliminated, and turning restrictionswere introduced.Upon completion of the separated bike lanes, some downtown businesses expressed concerns that thelanes and the changes in the use of road space had resulted in negative business impacts. In October 2010, prior to the installation of the bike lanes on Hornby, the City of Vancouver committed to conductinga business impact study. In response, the City of Vancouver, the Vancouver Economic DevelopmentCommission, The Vancouver Board of Trade, the Downtown Vancouver Business ImprovementAssociation, and the Downtown Vancouver Association came together to hire Stantec Consulting, Ltd. tomeasure the business impacts of the separated bike lanes and to develop mitigation strategies to addresspotential negative business impacts in identified „hot sp
ot‟
blocks.
This is the first-ever such study inNorth America, and perhaps the world, that has focused on identifying the local business impactsof separated bike lanes. Not only has the study provided an estimate of the business impact, ithas developed recommendations to mitigate the negative impacts to the business community anddetailed the lessons learned in order to guide future studies of this nature.
Economic Context
The study focused on collecting basic business economic data on rents, sales, vacancy and lease ratesthat would indicate the impact of the separated bike lanes, as well as data on the frequency of shoppingvisits by downtown or Metro Vancouver customers after the implementation of the separated bike lanes.This data was collected in the second quarter of 2011. Other policy changes at all levels of governmentthat have impacted the downtown retail environment include:The 2008-2009 national economic downturn;Increased parking rates due to the introduction of the harmonized sales tax (HST) in July 2010and the 14% tax increase for off-street paid parking implemented by TransLink;Road closures and access changes due to the 2010 Winter Olympics;The opening of the Canada Line rapid transit system in August 2009;The fuel tax increase of January 2010;Downtown construction that has altered traffic patterns;Filming activity in the downtown core;The re-introduction of buses on Granville St.; andStricter impaired driving rules.

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