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Henry: Portrait of an MK-ULTRA Assassin? by David McGowan

Henry: Portrait of an MK-ULTRA Assassin? by David McGowan

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Published by MansonCaseFile
Taken from http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2005/01/308911.shtml

Henry - Portrait of an MK-ULTRA Assassin?
David McGowan
June 2000

"Henry is an unusual prisoner. He's been given a high security cell and a few special amenities ..." Jim Boutwell, Sheriff of Williamson County, Texas

On June 30th of 1998, Henry Lee Lucas, arguably the most prolific and certainly one of the most sadistic serial killers in the annals of crime was scheduled for execution by the state of Texas. Given the advocacy of
Taken from http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2005/01/308911.shtml

Henry - Portrait of an MK-ULTRA Assassin?
David McGowan
June 2000

"Henry is an unusual prisoner. He's been given a high security cell and a few special amenities ..." Jim Boutwell, Sheriff of Williamson County, Texas

On June 30th of 1998, Henry Lee Lucas, arguably the most prolific and certainly one of the most sadistic serial killers in the annals of crime was scheduled for execution by the state of Texas. Given the advocacy of

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Published by: MansonCaseFile on Jul 31, 2011
Copyright:Public Domain

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Henry - Portrait of an MK-ULTRA Assassin?
David McGowan
 
June 2000
 "Henry is an unusual prisoner. He's been given a high security cell and a few specialamenities ..."Jim Boutwell, Sheriff of Williamson County, TexasOn June 30th of 1998, Henry Lee Lucas, arguably the most prolific and certainly one of the most sadistic serial killers in the annals of crime was scheduled for execution by thestate of Texas. Given the advocacy of the death penalty by Governor George W. Bush,things clearly weren't looking good for Henry at that time.Bush had not granted clemency to any condemned man in his tenure as governor. In fact,no governor of any state in the entire history of the country has carried out more judicialexecutions than has Governor George. At last count, the state of Texas had dispatched130 inmates on Bush's watch.So Texas was definitely not the place to be for a man in Henry's position. Andconsidering the nature of Henry's crimes, it seemed a certainty that nothing would standin the way of Henry's scheduled execution. There weren't likely to be any high-profilesupporters, a la Karla Faye Tucker (though even personal appeals to Bush from the likesof Pat Robertson failed to dissuade the governor from proceeding on schedule with MissTucker's execution). Not likely because Henry's crimes were of a particularly brutalnature, involving rape, torture, mutilation, dismemberment, necrophilia, cannibalism, and pedophilia, with the number of victims running as high as 300-600 by some accounts -including Henry's own, at times - though this figure is likely inflated.By all accounts though, Lucas, frequently working with partner Ottis Toole - a self described arsonist and cannibal - savagely murdered literally scores of victims of all ages,races, and genders. All indications were then that this was pretty much of a no-brainer for America's premier hanging governor. But then a most remarkable thing happened. OnJune 18, just twelve days before Henry's scheduled demise, Governor Bush asked theState Board of Pardons and Paroles, whose members are appointed by Bush himself, toreview Henry's case. Strangely enough, eight days later the Board uncharacteristicallyrecommended that Henry's execution not take place.
 
The very next day, just three days short of Henry's scheduled exit from this world, Lucas became the first - and to date only - recipient of Governor Bush's compassionateconservatism. The official rationale for this act of mercy was, apparently, that theevidence on which Lucas was sentenced did not support his conviction. There was a possibility that Henry was in fact innocent of the crime for which he was convicted. Never mind that many of the 130 death row inmates who did not get special gubernatorialattention prior to their executions had credible claims of innocence that were met with bynothing but scorn and mockery.Suddenly Little George had developed a keen interest in not executing innocent convicts. Never mind as well that some of those who have been executed despite claims of innocence were - other than the crime for which they were being executed - law-abidingcitizens. Whereas Henry was by all accounts a serial rapist, kidnapper, torturer andmurderer. And never mind that once Henry was spared, Bush promptly lost this passinginterest and began once again rubber stamping every execution order that crossed hisdesk, including that of a great-grandmother in her sixties who was convicted of killingher chronically abusive husband (Betty Lou Beets, in February 2000).And never mind that Bush has made no effort in the two years since Henry'scommutation to seek a new trial for Henry on one of the murders for which there isconclusive evidence of Lucas' guilt. Neither has he made any effort to extradite Henry toany of the other states in which Henry is wanted for various murders. It seems to me thatthe last time I checked, there was no statute of limitations for the crime of murder. Whyis Law-and-Order George not seeking a new death sentence for Lucas? And why is it thatHenry was granted full clemency, rather than a temporary stay during which his casecould have been reviewed? This is exactly what Bush has just done in the case of convicted murderer Ricky Nolen McGinn.Tellingly, the proliferation of press reports on the McGinn case, apparently meant tosoften Bush's image somewhat, have made virtually no reference to the governor's earlier actions on behalf of Lucas. Reporting on the McGinn case has avoided the mention of Lucas in one of two ways: by noting that this is the first capital case for which Bush hasissued a stay(which is true but deliberately deceptive), or by claiming outright that this isthe first death penalty case in which Bush has intervened (which is an outright andabsolutely shameless lie).And what if Lucas was in fact falsely convicted and his innocence was so blatantlyobvious that the governor had no choice but to commute Henry's sentence? What thendoes this say about the Texas criminal justice system and the ease with which it sendsinnocent men to their deaths? Are we to believe that Henry's case was an isolated one andthat none of the other men put to death during Bush's reign had equally credible claims of innocence?Clearly, there was something more at work then in the Lucas case than simply a questionof guilt. There had to be another reason why Bush would take such extraordinary steps to
 
spare the life of a man who had led a life of such brutality. And this was certainly not thefirst time that the criminal justice system had shown such extraordinary leniency towardsLucas.The first big break for Henry came around 1970, when he was released early from asentence he was then serving following his first murder conviction. Sentenced to 20-40years, Henry was released after serving just ten. This occurred just after Henry appeared before the parole board and explained to them that he wasn't ready to return to societyand would surely kill again if released. As Henry tells it, the questioning went somethinglike this: "Now Mr. Lucas, I must ask you, if we grant you parole, will you kill again?"Henry: "Yes, sir! If you release me now, I will kill again." Nevertheless, the board decided that ten years was an adequate amount of time to servefor the crime of killing one's mother and then violating the corpse. Fair enough. Within ayear, of course, Henry found himself back in prison, this time for attempting to abduct ayoung girl. Despite his prior record - which began long before killing his mother - Lucasserved just four years and was again released early, this time in August of 1975. Shortlythereafter, Henry and his new friend Ottis would commit an untold number of luridmurders spanning the next eight years. Henry would finally be arrested in October of 1982 on suspicion of two murders, only to be promptly released. He was not arrestedagain until June of 1983, and has been imprisoned ever since.After his final arrest, Henry was taken on tour, so to speak, by various law enforcementofficials around the country, during which time he confessed to some 600 murders in 26states. There were various charges made at the time that Henry was being used by hisescorts to clear troublesome unsolved murders in places he had never even been.This quite likely was the case. Henry seemed to have a very chummy relationship withhis captors, particularly the Texas Rangers, and provided a valuable service for them bytaking the rap for an amazing array of murders. This alone, however, does not explain the personal attention given to Henry's case by Governor Bush.For that, we need to look at some of the more infrequently noted details of Henry's lifehistory, many of them provided by Lucas himself. Henry, as it turns out, has someinteresting stories to tell. In 1985, just a couple years into his incarceration, he attemptedto tell his story in a book, written for him by a sympathetic author. The book, titled TheHand of Death: The Henry Lee Lucas Story, tells of Henry's indoctrination into anationwide Satanic cult. Lucas claimed that he was trained by the cult in a mobile paramilitary camp in the Florida Everglades in the fine art of killing, up close and personal. Other training involved abduction and arson techniques.He further claimed that leaders of the camp were so impressed with Henry's handling of aknife that he was allowed to serve as an instructor. Following his training, Henry claimedto have served the cult in various ways, including as a contract killer and as an abductor of children, who were then taken just over the border to a ranch in Mexico near Juarez.Henry has said that this cult operated out of Texas and from a ranch in northern Mexico,

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